gossip

کلمه
gossip
معادل فارسی: 

غیبت، بدگویی، پر حرفی

آدم پرحرف، آدم وراج

غیبت کردن، پشت سر دیگران حرف زدن

 

سطح، موضوع و برچسب

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

gossip

I. gossip1 /ˈɡɒsəp, ˈɡɒsɪp $ ˈɡɑː-/ noun
[Language: Old English; Origin: godsibb 'godparent, close friend', from god 'god' + sibb 'relative']
1. [uncountable] information that is passed from one person to another about other people’s behaviour and private lives, often including unkind or untrue remarks
gossip about
Here’s an interesting piece of gossip about Mrs Smith.
What’s the latest gossip?
Do you want to hear some juicy gossip?
She had no time for idle gossip.
It was common gossip how he felt about her.
You miss a lot of office gossip when you have a day off work.
On Sundays all the men gather in the square to exchange local gossip.
2. [countable usually singular] a conversation in which you exchange information with someone about other people’s lives and things that have happened:
Phil’s in there, having a gossip with Maggie.
3. [countable] someone who likes talking about other people’s private lives – used to show disapproval:
Rick’s a terrible gossip.
• • •

COLLOCATIONS

 

ADJECTIVES/NOUN + gossip

the latest gossip Annie usually has all the latest gossip.
juicy gossip (=interesting gossip) He said that he had some especially juicy gossip to tell us.
hot gossip (=interesting gossip) What’s the latest hot gossip going round at work then?
idle gossip (=gossip not based on facts) She had no time for idle gossip.
common gossip (=gossip that everyone knows about) Rumours about her affairs had become common gossip.
office gossip He told her a few bits of office gossip which he though might interest her.
village gossip BrE: She knew from village gossip how Harry had treated his first wife.
malicious gossip (=unkind gossip that is likely to upset someone) Has someone been spreading malicious gossip?

phrases

a piece of gossip I’ve got an interesting piece of gossip which might interest you.
be the subject of gossip (=be talked about) His close friendship with Carol was the subject of gossip.

verbs

exchange gossip (=talk about other people and their private lives with someone) They used to meet up and exchange gossip.
hear gossip Have you heard the latest gossip about Steve?
listen to gossip He was always willing to listen to gossip.
spread gossip Someone’s been spreading gossip about Lucy and Ian.
gossip goes around (=it is told by one person to another) It was a small village, and any gossip went around very quickly.
II. gossip2 verb [intransitive]
to talk about other people’s behaviour and private lives, often including remarks that are unkind or untrue
gossip about
The whole town was gossiping about them.
• • •

THESAURUS

 

to talk about everyday things

have a conversation to talk to someone for a long time about everyday things: She was having a conversation with one of her friends. | When I arrived, Joe and Jane were deep in conversation (=very involved in a conversation). | I can order food in a restaurant in French, but not have a conversation.
chat/have a chat informal to have a friendly informal conversation about things that are not very important: The girls were chatting outside the house. | It’s been nice having a chat with you.
gossip to talk about other people’s private lives when they are not there, especially about things that you have heard, which are not completely true: What are you two gossiping about?
visit with somebody American English informal to have a conversation with someone: I visited with him last week.
converse formal to have a conversation with someone: We met once and conversed briefly.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

gossip / ˈɡɒs.ɪp /   / ˈɡɑː.səp / noun

B2 [ S or U ] conversation or reports about other people's private lives that might be unkind, disapproving, or not true:

Her letter was full of gossip.

Jane and Lyn sat in the kitchen having a good gossip about their friends.

I don't like all this idle gossip.

I've got some juicy gossip for you.

Have you heard the (latest) gossip?

[ C ] disapproving ( mainly UK gossipmonger ) someone who enjoys talking about other people and their private lives:

She's a terrible gossip.

 

gossipy / ˈɡɒs.ɪ.pi /   / ˈɡɑː.sɪ.pi / adjective

a gossipy letter

gossipy people
 

gossip / ˈɡɒs.ɪp /   / ˈɡɑː.səp / verb [ I ]

B2 to talk about other people's private lives:

Stop gossiping and get on with some work.

People have started to gossip about us.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

gossip

gos·sip [gossip gossips gossiped gossiping] noun, verb   [ˈɡɒsɪp]   [ˈɡɑːsɪp] 

noun

1. uncountable (disapproving) informal talk or stories about other people's private lives, that may be unkind or not true

• Don't believe all the gossip you hear. 

• Tell me all the latest gossip! 

• The gossip was that he had lost a fortune on the stock exchange. 

• It was common gossip (= everyone said so) that they were having an affair. 

• She's a great one for idle gossip (= she enjoys spreading stories about other people that are probably not true). 

2. countable, usually singular a conversation about other people and their private lives

• I love a good gossip. 

3. countable (disapproving) a person who enjoys talking about other people's private lives 
 

Word Origin:

late Old English godsibb, ‘godfather, godmother, baptismal sponsor’, literally ‘a person related to one in God’, from god ‘God’ + sibb ‘a relative’ (see sib). In Middle English the sense was ‘a close friend, a person with whom one gossips’, hence ‘a person who gossips’, later (early 19th cent.) ‘idle talk’ (from the verb, which dates from the early 17th cent.). 
 

Synonyms:

discussion

conversation • dialogue • talk • debate • consultation • chat • gossip 

These are all words for an occasion when people talk about sth.

discussion • a detailed conversation about sth that is considered to be important: ▪ Discussions are still taking place between the two leaders. 

conversation • a talk, usually a private or informal one, involving two people or a small group; the activity of talking in this way: ▪ a telephone conversation 

dialogue • conversations in a book, play or film: ▪ The novel has long descriptions and not much dialogue. A dialogue is also a formal discussion between two groups, especially when they are trying to solve a problem or end a dispute: ▪ The President told waiting reporters there had been a constructive dialogue. 

talk • a conversation or discussion, often one about a problem or sth important for the people involved: ▪ I had a long talk with my boss about my career prospects. 

debate • a formal discussion of an issue at a public meeting or in a parliament. In a debate two or more speakers express opposing views and then there is often a vote on the issue: ▪ a debate on prison reform 

consultation • a formal discussion between groups of people before a decision is made about sth: ▪ There have been extensive consultations between the two countries. 

chat • a friendly informal conversation; informal talking. The countable use of chat is especially British English: ▪ I just called in for a chat about the kids. 

gossip • a conversation about other people and their private lives: ▪ We had a good gossip about the boss. 

a discussion/conversation/dialogue/talk/debate/consultation/chat/gossip about sth

a discussion/conversation/dialogue/debate/consultation on sth

in (close) discussion/conversation/dialogue/debate/consultation with sb

to have a discussion/conversation/dialogue/talk/debate/consultation/chat/gossip with sb

to hold a discussion/conversation/debate/consultation 
 

Synonyms:

speaker

communicator • gossip • talker 

These are all words for a person who talks or who is talking, especially in a particular way.

speaker • a person who is or was speaking; a person who speaks a particular language: ▪ I looked around to see who the speaker was. ◊ ▪ a fluent Arabic speaker 

communicator • (rather formal) a person who is able to describe their ideas and feelings clearly to others: ▪ The ideal candidate will be an effective communicator. 

gossip • (disapproving) a person who enjoys talking about other people's private lives: ▪ Myra is a dear, but she's also a terrible gossip. 

talker • a person who talks in a particular way or who talks a lot: ▪ He's a very persuasive talker. ◊ ▪ She's a (great) talker ▪ (= she talks a lot) ▪. 

speaker or talker?

Talker is used when you are talking about how much sb talks or how well they talk. It is not used for the person who is or was talking: I looked round to see who the talker was. You can say that sb is a good/persuasive speaker but that means that they are good at making speeches. If you mean that they speak well in conversation, use talker.

a good/great speaker/communicator/talker

an effective/excellent speaker/communicator 
 

Example Bank:

• A piece of silly gossip was going round the school. 

• He knows all the juicy gossip. 

• I heard an interesting bit of gossip yesterday. 

• I saw it in the gossip column of the local newspaper. 

• It's common gossip in the office that she's about to leave her husband. 

• She's having a gossip with Maria. 

• Someone has been spreading malicious gossip about me. 

• We had a good gossip about the boss. 

• You shouldn't listen to idle gossip. 

• a magazine full of gossip about famous people 

• I was having a gossip with Maggie when he arrived. 

• It was common gossip that they were having an affair. 

• Myra is a dear, but she's also a terrible gossip. 

• She's a great one for idle gossip. 

• Tell me all the latest gossip! 

• office gossip 

Derived Word: gossipy 
 

verb intransitive 

to talk about other people's private lives, often in an unkind way

• I can't stand here gossiping all day. 

• ~ about sb/sth She's been gossiping about you. 

Word Origin:

late Old English godsibb, ‘godfather, godmother, baptismal sponsor’, literally ‘a person related to one in God’, from god ‘God’ + sibb ‘a relative’ (see sib). In Middle English the sense was ‘a close friend, a person with whom one gossips’, hence ‘a person who gossips’, later (early 19th cent.) ‘idle talk’ (from the verb, which dates from the early 17th cent.). 
 

Example Bank:

• I can't stand here gossiping all day. 

• She's been gossiping about you. 

Wiktionary

gossip

   1. noun
a) Someone who likes to talk about someone else’s private or personal business.
b) Idle talk about someone’s private or personal matters, especially someone not present.
Syn: scuttle-butt
2. verb
a) To talk about someone elses private or personal business, especially in a way that spread s the information.
b) To talk idly.

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