dim

اشتراک گذاری در شبکه های اجتماعی

کلمه
dim
معنی: 

کم نور ، تاریک ، جایی که به خوبی نمی توان دید زیرا نور کافی وجود ندارد. 

 

معادل فارسی: 

کم نور

تار ، مبهم

مات ، کدر

کمسو کردن یا شدن

چشم کمسو یا ضعیف

دیرفهم ، کم هوش

 

مثال: 

This light is too dim to read by. 

این نور برای مطالعه بسیار کم است . 

I could see a dim shape in the doorway.

میتونستم یک سایه مبهم را در درگاه ببینم .

His eyesight is getting dim.

سوی چشمانش در حال کم شدن است. 

She had a dim recollection of the visit.

از ملاقات خاطرات مبهمی یادش می آید. 

The lights in the theatre dimmed as the curtain rose.  

زمانی که پرده ی نمایش بالا رفت نورهای داخل تاتر کم شدند. 

Her passion for dancing never dimmed over the years.  

علاقه اش برای رقصیدن در این سال ها هیچگاه کم نشده است .
 

سطح، موضوع و برچسب

برچسب ها: 
سطح: 

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

dim

I. dim1 /dɪm/ adjective (comparative dimmer, superlative dimmest)
[Language: Old English]
1. DARK fairly dark or not giving much light, so that you cannot see well OPP bright:
in the dim light of the early dawn
a dim glow
2. SHAPE a dim shape is one which is not easy to see because it is too far away, or there is not enough light:
The dim outline of a building loomed up out of the mist.
3. take a dim view of something to disapprove of something:
Miss Watson took a dim view of Paul’s behaviour.
4. dim recollection/awareness etc a memory or understanding of something that is not clear in your mind SYN vague:
Laura had a dim recollection of someone telling her this before.
5. EYES literary dim eyes are weak and cannot see well:
Isaac was old and his eyes were dim.
6. FUTURE CHANCES if your chances of success in the future are dim, they are not good:
Prospects for an early settlement of the dispute are dim.
7. in the dim and distant past a very long time ago – used humorously
8. NOT INTELLIGENT informal not intelligent:
You can be really dim sometimes!
—dimly adverb:
a dimly lit room
She was only dimly aware of the risk.
—dimness noun [uncountable]
• • •

THESAURUS

dark if a place is dark, there is little or no light: The room was very dark. | No, you can’t play outside, it’s too dark. | It was a dark night with clouds covering the moon.
dimly-lit a dimly-lit building or place is fairly dark because the lights there are not very bright: a dimly-lit restaurant | The church was dimly lit.
dim a dim light is fairly dark: The camera can take good pictures even in dim lighting. | The evening sky grew dim.
darkened a darkened room or building is darker than usual, especially because its lights have been turned off or the curtains have been drawn: The prisoner lay in a darkened room. | The play starts with a darkened stage, and the sound of a woman singing softly.
gloomy a gloomy place or room is not at all bright or cheerful: The bar was gloomy and smelled of stale cigar smoke.
murky dark and difficult to see through – used especially about water: the murky waters of the lake | I could hardly see him in the murky light of the bar.
pitch-dark/pitch-black completely dark, so that nothing can be seen: It was pitch-dark inside the shed.
shady a shady place is cooler and darker than the area around it, because the light of the sun cannot reach it: It was nice and shady under the trees. | They found a shady spot for a picnic.
II. dim2 verb (past tense and past participle dimmed, present participle dimming)
1. [intransitive and transitive] if a light dims, or if you dim it, it becomes less bright:
The lights in the theatre began to dim.
2. [intransitive and transitive] if a feeling, quality etc dims or is dimmed, it grows weaker or less:
Even the rain could not dim their enthusiasm.
Hopes of a peaceful settlement have dimmed.
3. dim your headlights/lights American English to lower the angle of the front lights of your car, especially when someone is driving towards you SYN dip British English

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

dim

dim /dɪm/
adjective dimmer, dimmest
1 not giving or having much light:
The lamp gave out a dim light.
He sat in a dim corner of the waiting-room.
We could see a dim (= not easily seen) shape in the fog.

2 LITERARY If your eyes are dim, you cannot see very well.

3 a dim memory/recollection, etc. something that you remember slightly, but not very well:
I had a dim recollection of having met her before.

4 INFORMAL not very clever:
He's a nice chap, but a little dim.
Don't be dim.

5 not likely to succeed:
The company's prospects for the future are rather dim.

dim /dɪm/
verb [I or T] -mm-
1 to (make something) become less bright:
Someone dimmed the lights.
The lights dimmed and the curtains opened.

2 LITERARY to (make a positive feeling or quality) less strong:
Our hopes/expectations dimmed as the hours passed.

dimly /ˈdɪm.li/
adverb
The room was dimly lit.
I dimly remembered seeing the film before.

dimness /ˈdɪm.nəs/
noun [U]

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

dim

Click and drag to moveClick and drag to move

dim [dim dims dimmed dimming dimmer dimmest] adjective, verb   [dɪm]    [dɪm] 

 

adjective (dim·mer, dim·mest) 

 

LIGHT

1. not bright

• the dim glow of the fire in the grate

• This light is too dim to read by.  

 

PLACE

2. where you cannot see well because there is not much light

• a dim room/street  

 

SHAPE

 

3. that you cannot see well because there is not much light

• the dim outline of a house in the moonlight

• I could see a dim shape in the doorway.  

 

 

EYES

 

4. not able to see well

• His eyesight is getting dim.  

 

 

MEMORIES

 

5. that you cannot remember or imagine clearly

Syn:  vague

• dim memories

• She had a dim recollection of the visit.

• (humorous) in the dim and distant past  

 

 

PERSON

 

6. (informal, especially BrE) not intelligent

• He's very dim.  

 

 

SITUATION

 

7. not giving any reason to have hope; not good

• Her future career prospects look dim.

 

Word Origin:

Old English dim, dimm, of Germanic origin; related to German dialect timmer.

 

Thesaurus:

dim adj.

1.

• The light was too dim to read by.

faint • • weak • • soft • |literary thin •

Opp: bright

dim/faint/weak/soft/thin light

a dim/faint/soft glow

a dim/faint outline

Dim, faint or weak? Dim describes light in a room or place when it is not bright enough to see clearly; faint describes a particular point of light which is hard to see; weak usually describes sunlight that is not bright.

2.

• They stepped into the dim and cluttered shop.

gloomy • • dreary • • dingy •

Opp: bright

a dim/gloomy/dreary/dingy room

a dim/gloomy corridor/interior/street

a dim/gloomy/dreary place/day

 

Example Bank:

• He seems incredibly dim sometimes!

• He was good-natured but rather dim.

• The living room looked dim and shadowy.

• A dim lamp swung in the entrance.

• A voice came from the dim interior.

• It was hard to see in the dim glow of the streetlights.

• Owls' eyesight is good in dim light.

• She was a pleasant but rather dim young woman.

• The light is too dim to read by.

• The room was dim because the curtains were half drawn.

• The room was very dim with a murky greenish light.

• They stepped into the dim and cluttered little shop.

Idiom: take a dim view of somebody

Derived Word: dimness 

 

verb (-mm-) 

 

 

LIGHT

 

1. intransitive, transitive ~ (sth) if a light dims or if you dim it, it becomes or you make it less bright

• The lights in the theatre dimmed as the curtain rose.  

 

 

FEELING/QUALITY

 

2. intransitive, transitive ~ (sth) if a feeling or quality dims, or if sth dims it, it becomes less strong

• Her passion for dancing never dimmed over the years.

Verb forms:

Click and drag to move

 

Word Origin:

Old English dim, dimm, of Germanic origin; related to German dialect timmer.

 

Example Bank:

• The electric light flickered and dimmed slightly.

• We dimmed the lights in the room.

• Dim the lights to create some atmosphere.

  

Wiktionary

dim

   1. adjective
a) not bright or colorful
b) not smart or intelligent
2. verb
a) To make something less bright.
b) To become darker.

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