B2 (بالای متوسط)

clear the air

clear the air [idiom]

discussing something to remove bad feelings and misunderstanding between people

صحبت کردن درباره ی چیزی برای از بین بردن سوء تفاهم و حس بد میان افراد

clear the air - برطرف کردن سوء تفاهم

برطرف کردن سوء تفاهم

مثال: 

He finally cleared the air by saying that she was late just because of traffic and she didn’t mean to disrespect the rules.

بالاخره سوء تفاهم رو برطرف کرد و گفت به دلیل ترافیک  دیر اومده و قصد بی احترامی به قوانین رو نداشته.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

clear the air  

to do something to end an argument or bad situation, for example discuss a problem calmly

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

clear the air

C2 to remove the bad feelings between people:  
I had a massive argument with Sue, but at least it has cleared the air.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
©Cambridge University Press 2013

Wiktionary

clear the air
verb
To assuage a hostile situation.
The bouncer was called in to clear the air after a violent argument between the married couple in the bar.

pride

pride [noun] (SATISFACTION)

A feeling of pleasure and satisfaction that you get because you or people connected with you have done or got something good

US /praɪd/ 
UK /praɪd/ 

سربلندی ، افتخار

مثال: 

She felt a great sense of pride as she watched him accept the award.

آهنگ وترانه: 
You Are The Reason - Chris De Burgh

Oxford Essential Dictionary

pride

 noun (no plural)

1 the feeling that you are proud of something that you or others have got or have done:
She showed us her painting with great pride.

2 the feeling that you are better than other people

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

pride

I. pride1 S3 W3 /praɪd/ BrE AmE noun
[Language: Old English; Origin: pryde, from prud 'proud']
1. FEELING OF PLEASURE [uncountable] a feeling that you are proud of something that you or someone connected with you has achieved ⇨ proud:
He wore his medals with pride.
pride in
He takes great pride in his children’s achievements.
The people have a sense of pride in their community.
His heart swelled with pride when his daughter came in.
She felt a glow of pride when her name was announced for the prize.
Success in sport is a source of national pride.
2. RESPECT [uncountable] a feeling that you like and respect yourself and that you deserve to be respected by other people ⇨ proud
sb’s pride
It hurt his pride when his wife left him.
I think that getting a job would give him his pride back.
She didn’t try to hide her anger and injured pride.
It’s a matter of pride for some men that their wives don’t have to work.
3. TOO MUCH PRIDE [uncountable] a belief that you are better than other people and do not need their help or support ⇨ proud
sb’s pride
His pride wouldn’t allow him to ask for help.
She ought to swallow her pride (=ignore or forget her feelings of pride) and call him.
4. take pride in your work/appearance etc to do something very carefully and well, in a way that gives you a lot of satisfaction:
Your should take more pride in your work.
She took great pride in her appearance.
5. sb’s pride and joy a person or thing that someone is very proud of:
His garden is his pride and joy.
6. the pride of something
a) the thing or person that the people in a particular place are most proud of:
Wigan’s rugby team was the pride of the town.
b) the best thing in a group:
a beautiful Japanese sword that is the pride of our collection
7. have/take pride of place if something has or takes pride of place, it is put in the best place for people to see because it is the thing you are most proud of:
A large photograph of the children had pride of place on the sitting room wall.
8. LIONS [countable] a group of lions:
A young lion had strayed some distance from the pride.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ adjectives
great pride Caroline is pictured here holding the trophy with great pride.
immense pride (=very great) He takes immense pride in his grandson.
national pride (=pride in your country) A flag is a symbol of national pride.
civic pride (=pride in your town or city) The museum is a vital source of civic pride.
■ verbs
take pride in something (=feel proud of something) She takes pride in her beautiful gardens.
be bursting with pride (=feel very proud) I could see that her mother was bursting with pride.
swell with pride (=start to feel very proud) He would swell with pride as he discussed his department’s achievements.
glow with pride (=look very proud) ‘I knew he could do it,’ she said, glowing with pride.
■ phrases
a sense of pride I still feel a sense of pride at having been a member of the regiment.
a source of pride (=a reason to feel proud) The Chinese Olympic Games were a source of pride to the whole country.
• • •
THESAURUS
satisfaction a feeling of happiness or pleasure, especially because you have achieved something good or useful: Most teachers take great pride and satisfaction in their work.
pride a feeling of pleasure and satisfaction that you get when you or someone connected with you has achieved something good: Her father’s pride in her accomplishments was clear. | I was blushing with pride because I had been chosen to be on the team.
contentment the feeling of being happy and satisfied because you have what you want or need. Contentment is rather a formal use: Only when you truly know yourself can you find contentment. | He sat back with a look of deep contentment on his face.
fulfilment British English, fulfillment American English a feeling of being satisfied and happy with your life. Fulfilment is rather a formal use: Some women find fulfillment in being a mother, but this is not true for all women.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

pride

pride [pride prides prided priding] noun, verb   [praɪd]    [praɪd]

noun  

PLEASURE/SATISFACTION
1. uncountable, singular a feeling of pleasure or satisfaction that you get when you or people who are connected with you have done sth well or own sth that other people admire
The sight of her son graduating filled her with pride.
He felt a glow of pride as people stopped to admire his garden.
~ (in sth) I take (a) pride in my work.
~ (in doing sth) We take great pride in offering the best service in town.
I looked with pride at what I had achieved.

• Success in sport is a source of national pride.

2. singular the ~ of sth a person or thing that gives people a feeling of pleasure or satisfaction

• The new sports stadium is the pride of the town.  

RESPECT FOR YOURSELF

3. uncountable the feeling of respect that you have for yourself
Pride would not allow him to accept the money.
Her pride was hurt.
Losing his job was a real blow to his pride.

• It's time to swallow your pride (= hide your feelings of pride) and ask for your job back.

4. uncountable (disapproving) the feeling that you are better or more important than other people
• Male pride forced him to suffer in silence.

see also  proud  

LIONS

5. countable + singular or plural verb a group of lions 
Word Origin:
late Old English prȳde ‘excessive self-esteem’, variant of prȳtu, prȳte, from prūd ‘having a high opinion of one's own worth’, from Old French prud ‘valiant’, based on Latin prodesse ‘be of value’.  
Thesaurus:
pride noun
1. U, sing.
We take great pride in our nation's success in sport.
satisfactionhappinesscontentment|BrE fulfilment|AmE fulfillment
Opp: shame
pride/satisfaction/happiness/contentment/fulfilment in sth
bring sb pride/satisfaction/happiness/contentment/fulfilment
take pride/satisfaction in sth
2. U
I'm sorry if I hurt your pride.
dignityself-esteemself-respectfeelings|sometimes disapproving ego
injured/personal pride/dignity/self-esteem/feelings
hurt sb's pride/feelings
restore sb's pride/dignity/self-esteem/self-respect
3. U (disapproving)
Male pride forced him to suffer in silence.
egoismvanityarrogance|especially written conceit|literary hubris
Opp: humility, Opp: modesty
appeal to sb's pride/vanity 
Synonyms:
satisfaction
happiness pride contentment fulfilment
These are all words for the good feeling that you have when you are happy or when you have achieved sth.
satisfactionthe good feeling that you have when you have achieved sth or when sth that you wanted to happen does happen: He derived great satisfaction from knowing that his son was happy.
happinessthe good feeling that you have when you are happy: Money can't buy you happiness.
pridea feeling of pleasure or satisfaction that you get when you or people who are connected with you have done sth well or own sth that other people admire: The sight of her son graduating filled her with pride.
contentment(rather formal) a feeling of happiness or satisfaction with what you have: They found contentment in living a simple life.
fulfilmenta feeling of happiness or satisfaction with what you do or have done: her search for personal fulfilment
satisfaction, happiness, contentment or fulfilment?
You can feel satisfaction at achieving almost anything, small or large; you feel fulfilment when you do sth useful and enjoyable with your life. Happiness is the feeling you have when things give you pleasure and can be quite a lively feeling; contentment is a quieter feeling that you get when you have learned to find pleasure in things.
satisfaction/happiness/pride/contentment/fulfilment in sth
real satisfaction/happiness/pride/contentment/fulfilment
true satisfaction/happiness/contentment/fulfilment
great satisfaction/happiness/pride
quiet satisfaction/pride/contentment
to feel satisfaction/happiness/pride/contentment
to bring sb satisfaction/happiness/pride/contentment/fulfilment
to find satisfaction/happiness/contentment/fulfilment 
Example Bank:
Businesses rushed to include images of patriotic pride in their marketing.
He smiled with fatherly pride.
He swelled with pride as he held the trophy.
He was nursing his hurt pride.
His masculine pride would not let him admit that a girl had defeated him.
I didn't mean to hurt your pride.
I don't want your money— I have my pride, you know!
I wear my policeman's uniform with pride.
It is a matter of pride for him that he has never accepted money from his family.
It was foolish pride that prevented me from believing her.
It would be stupid to refuse through pride.
She expressed pride in her child's achievement.
She refused his offer tactfully, allowing him to go away with his pride intact.
She refused their help out of pride.
She swallowed her pride and called him.
She takes great pride in her work.
She took justifiable pride in her son's achievements.
Their reputation for fairness is a matter for pride.
They have a fierce pride in their traditions.
They have a strong sense of pride in their work.
They managed to salvage some pride with a late goal.
We want to restore pride in our public services.
the politics of racial pride and Black Power
He loves that boat, it's his pride and joy.
His pride would not allow him to admit she was right.
I take (a) pride in my work.
I'm sorry if I hurt your pride.
It's time to swallow your pride and ask for help.
She was conceited, haughty and full of pride and arrogance.
What's wrong— did I hurt your macho pride?
You're going to have to swallow your pride and ask for your job back.
Idioms: pride goes before a fall  pride of place  somebody's pride and joy

Derived: pride yourself on on doing something 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

pride / praɪd / noun (SATISFACTION)

B2 [ U ] a feeling of pleasure and satisfaction that you get because you or people connected with you have done or got something good:

She felt a great sense of pride as she watched him accept the award.

He felt such pride walking his little daughter down the street.

→  See also proud adjective (SATISFIED)

take pride in sth/sb to feel very pleased about something or someone you are closely connected with:

If you don't take professional pride in your work, you're probably in the wrong job.
 

pride / praɪd / noun [ U ] (RESPECT FOR YOURSELF)

B2 your feelings of your own worth and respect for yourself:

She has too much pride to accept any help.

The country's national pride has been damaged by its sporting failures.

 

pride / praɪd / noun [ U ] disapproving (FEELING OF IMPORTANCE)

the belief that you are better or more important than other people:

Pride was his downfall.

→  See also proud adjective (FEELING IMPORTANT)

 

pride / praɪd / noun [ C ] (LIONS)

a group of lions

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

pride

/praɪd/
(prides, priding, prided)

Frequency: The word is one of the 3000 most common words in English.

1.
Pride is a feeling of satisfaction which you have because you or people close to you have done something good or possess something good.
...the sense of pride in a job well done...
We take pride in offering you the highest standards...
They can look back on their endeavours with pride.
N-UNCOUNT: oft N in n/-ing

2.
Pride is a sense of the respect that other people have for you, and that you have for yourself.
It was a severe blow to Kendall’s pride.
= self-esteem
N-UNCOUNT

3.
Someone’s pride is the feeling that they have that they are better or more important than other people.
His pride may still be his downfall.
= arrogance
N-UNCOUNT [disapproval]

4.
If you pride yourself on a quality or skill that you have, you are very proud of it.
Smith prides himself on being able to organise his own life...
VERB: V pron-refl on -ing/n

5.
Someone or something that is your pride and joy is very important to you and makes you feel very happy.
The bike soon became his pride and joy.
PHRASE: v-link PHR

6.
If something takes pride of place, it is treated as the most important thing in a group of things.
A three-foot-high silver World Championship cup takes pride of place near a carved wooden chair...
PHRASE: PHR after v

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1pride /ˈpraɪd/ noun, pl prides
1 [noncount]
a : a feeling that you respect yourself and deserve to be respected by other people : self-respect
• Being able to work again gave him his pride back.
• Getting caught cheating stripped him of his pride.
Pride would not allow her to give up.
• It's a matter of pride that he does the work all by himself.
b : a feeling that you are more important or better than other people
• The novel is about a family consumed with pride and vanity.
• They needed help, but their pride wouldn't let them ask for it.
• I had to swallow my pride and admit I made a mistake.
2 a : a feeling of happiness that you get when you or someone you know does something good, difficult, etc.

[noncount]

• The sight of her son holding the trophy filled her with pride. [=made her very proud]
• She spoke with pride [=she spoke proudly] about her son's achievements.
• She looked at her painting with pride. [=satisfaction]
• He takes pride in [=is proud of] his work.

[singular]

• He showed a great/immense pride in his family.
b [singular] : a person or thing that makes you feel proud
• These young people are the pride of their community.
3 [count] : a group of lions
pride and joy : someone or something that makes you very proud and happy
• Our children are our pride and joy.
• The car is his pride and joy.
pride of place : the highest position or best place
• The Nobel Prize winner was given pride of place at the conference.
• The statue has pride of place in the center of town.
• A picture of their children took pride of place on the wall.
- pride·ful /ˈpraɪdfəl/ adj [more ~; most ~] US
• a prideful [=proud] parent
• He was too prideful to accept their help.
- pride·ful·ly adv US

get out of here

get out of here [idiom]

something you say when something good happens to someone

نه بابا، شوخی میکنی، بی خیال

مثال: 

Sally's brother is dating my cousin? Get outta here!

You just won the lottery? Get outta here!

Wiktionary

get out of here

1. verb
To leave or exit a place.
If youre smart, dont sign the employment contract and get out of here while you still can.
2. interjection
a) Command for someone to leave immediately.
b) An exclamation of disbelief
Syn: get out of town

explosion

explosion [noun] (BURST)

The fact of something such as a bomb exploding

US /ɪkˈsploʊ.ʒən/ 
UK /ɪkˈspləʊ.ʒən/ 

انفجار

مثال: 

The fire was thought to have been caused by a gas explosion.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

explosion

 noun
the sudden bursting and loud noise of something such as a bomb exploding:
There was an explosion and pieces of glass flew everywhere.
The verb is explode.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

explosion

explosion W3 /ɪkˈspləʊʒən $ -ˈsploʊ-/ BrE AmE noun
[Word Family: adjective: exploding, ↑explosive, ↑exploded, ↑unexploded; noun: ↑explosion, ↑explosive; verb: ↑explode; adverb: ↑explosively]
1. [countable] a loud sound and the energy produced by something such as a bomb bursting into small pieces ⇨ explode
bomb/gas/nuclear explosion
Several people were injured in a bomb explosion.
We heard a loud explosion.
huge/massive etc explosion
A massive explosion ripped through the building.
2. [uncountable and countable] a process in which something such as a bomb is deliberately made to explode:
Police carried out a controlled explosion of the device.
3. [countable] a sudden or quick increase in the number or amount of something:
the population explosion in India
explosion of
the recent explosion of interest in Latin music and dance
4. [countable] a sudden expression of emotion, especially anger SYN outburst
5. [countable] a sudden very loud noise
explosion of
an explosion of laughter
• • •
COLLOCATIONS (for Meanings 1 & 2)
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + explosion
a big explosion There has been a big explosion in the centre of Paris.
a huge/massive/enormous explosion An enormous explosion tore the roof off the building.
a tremendous explosion (=very big and powerful) The torpedo struck the side of the ship, followed by a tremendous explosion.
a powerful explosion The powerful explosion was heard from Portland, Maine to Albany, New York.
a major explosion formal We are getting reports of a major explosion at the oil refinery.
a loud explosion We heard several loud explosions followed by an eerie silence.
a deafening explosion (=extremely loud) The building collapsed in a deafening explosion.
an almighty explosion old-fashioned (=extremely loud) There was an almighty explosion and I was knocked to the ground.
a muffled explosion (=one that is not heard very clearly) We could just make out a muffled explosion from deep inside the mine.
a nuclear/atomic explosion This is the site of the first ever nuclear explosion.
a gas explosion Firefighters say that a gas explosion destroyed the building.
a volcanic explosion (=one caused by a volcano) You could see where a volcanic explosion had blown the mountain peak away.
■ verbs
cause an explosion The police do not yet know what caused the explosion.
set off/trigger an explosion (=cause an explosion) Investigators believe a fuel leak may have triggered the explosion.
carry out an explosion (=cause one deliberately) By 1942, the United States had carried out test explosions with nuclear bombs.
hear an explosion Marie was reading in bed when she heard the explosion.
an explosion takes place/happens The largest explosion took place at the main post office.
an explosion occurs formal The explosion occurred just off the coast of Greece.
an explosion shakes something A series of explosions shook the building.
an explosion destroys something Seven people died when the explosion destroyed the bus.
an explosion kills somebody Last year, an underground explosion killed 82 miners.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS (for Meaning 3)
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + explosion
a sudden explosion Henry thought she was going to laugh, but then there was a sudden explosion of sobbing.
a population explosion The decision not to plant the fields led to a population explosion in rabbits.
■ phrases
an explosion of interest in something There has been an explosion of interest in networking websites in the last few years.
an explosion of violence The army had to cope with the explosion of violence that followed the elections.
an explosion of anger The verdict was greeted by an explosion of public anger.
an explosion of colour literary After the rain, the desert bloomed in an explosion of color.
• • •
THESAURUS
■ a very big increase
explosion noun [countable] a sudden very large increase in the amount or number of something: There has been an explosion in the number of fast food restaurants. | The country experienced a population explosion. | The book caused an explosion of interest in Renaissance Italy.
boom noun [singular] a sudden large increase in trade, profits or sales, with the result that a country, company, or industry becomes very successful. Boom is also used about a sudden increase in interest in something, with the result that it becomes very popular: the German economic boom of the 1960s | the Internet boom | There has been a boom in sales of diet books and videos.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

explosion

ex·plo·sion [explosion explosions]   [ɪkˈspləʊʒn]    [ɪkˈsploʊʒn]  noun
1. countable, uncountable the sudden violent bursting and loud noise of sth such as a bomb exploding; the act of deliberately causing sth to explode
a bomb/nuclear/gas explosion
There were two loud explosions and then the building burst into flames.
Bomb Squad officers carried out a controlled explosion of the device.

300 people were injured in the explosion.

2. countable a large, sudden or rapid increase in the amount or number of sth
a population explosion
an explosion of interest in learning Japanese

an explosion in oil prices

3. countable (formal) a sudden, violent expression of emotion, especially anger
Syn:  outburst
Do you know what brought on that explosion?
Demonstrators clashed with riot police in an explosion of anger at live animal exports.  
Word Origin:
early 17th cent.: from Latin explosio(n-) ‘scornful rejection’, from the verb explodere ‘drive out by clapping, hiss off the stage’, from ex- ‘out’ + plaudere ‘to clap’.  
Thesaurus:
explosion noun C
The explosion destroyed the building.
journalism blast
a loud/deafening/powerful/massive/huge explosion/blast
a bomb/gas/chemical/nuclear explosion/blast
a/an explosion/blast rips through/rocks sth 
Example Bank:
3 people were injured in the explosion.
A huge explosion rocked the entire building.
A loud explosion echoed around the valley.
A massive explosion erupted behind him.
A massive explosion ripped through the chemical works.
An explosion blew out the front windows.
Bomb disposal experts carried out a controlled explosion on the suspect package.
How can we keep up with the information explosion?
I believe we will see an explosion in lawsuits of this kind.
If no action is taken, the country runs the risk of a social explosion.
In the 1860s a veritable explosion of major scientific publications took place.
The build-up of gas caused a small explosion.
The explosion came 20 minutes after a coded warning to the police.
The explosion caused major structural damage.
The explosion occurred just after midday.
The explosion shook nearby homes.
The floor shook with a distant explosion.
The shock waves of this political explosion engulfed the whole of Europe.
There was a muffled explosion somewhere on their right.
a great explosion of creativity
a nuclear test explosion
a sudden explosion in the number of students
a sudden explosion of anger
The explosion sent a large cloud of smoke and dust into the air.

The world changed with the explosion of the first atomic bomb.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

explosion / ɪkˈspləʊ.ʒ ə n /   / -ˈsploʊ- / noun [ C or U ] (BURST)

explosion

B2 the fact of something such as a bomb exploding:

The fire was thought to have been caused by a gas explosion.

The explosion (= the intentional exploding) of nuclear devices in the Bikini Atoll was stopped in 1958.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

explosion

/ɪksploʊʒ(ə)n/
(explosions)

Frequency: The word is one of the 3000 most common words in English.

1.
An explosion is a sudden, violent burst of energy, for example one caused by a bomb.
After the second explosion, all of London’s main train and subway stations were shut down...
Three people have been killed in a bomb explosion in northwest Spain.
= blast
N-COUNT

2.
Explosion is the act of deliberately causing a bomb or similar device to explode.
Bomb disposal experts blew up the bag in a controlled explosion...
N-VAR

3.
An explosion is a large rapid increase in the number or amount of something.
The study also forecast an explosion in the diet soft-drink market...
The spread of the suburbs has triggered a population explosion among America’s deer.
N-COUNT: with supp

4.
An explosion is a sudden violent expression of someone’s feelings, especially anger.
Every time they met, Myra anticipated an explosion...
= outburst
N-COUNT

5.
An explosion is a sudden and serious political protest or violence.
...the explosion of protest and violence sparked off by the killing of seven workers.
N-COUNT

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

explosion

ex·plo·sion /ɪkˈsploʊʒən/ noun, pl -sions [count]
1 : the sudden, loud, and violent release of energy that happens when something (such as a bomb) breaks apart in a way that sends parts flying outward
• The filmmakers staged the car's explosion.
• The island was rocked by a series of volcanic explosions.
• set off an explosion
2 a : a sudden and very fast increase
• The region has experienced a population explosion.
• an explosion of interest
b : a sudden expression of some strong emotion
• an explosion of anger
c : a sudden occurrence of laughter
• His comments prompted an explosion of laughter from the crowd.

rip

rip [verb] (TEAR)

To pull apart; to tear or be torn violently and quickly

US /rɪp/ 
UK /rɪp/ 

جر دادن‌، (با فشار ناگهان‌) پاره‌ كردن‌

مثال: 

She excitedly ripped the parcel open .

Oxford Essential Dictionary

rip

 verb (rips, ripping, ripped )
to pull or tear something quickly and suddenly:
I ripped my shirt on a nail.
Joe ripped the letter open.

rip somebody off (informal) to cheat somebody by making them pay too much for something:
Tourists complained that they were being ripped off by local taxi drivers.
The noun is rip-off.

rip something up to tear something into small pieces:
She ripped the photo up.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

rip

I. rip1 S3 /rɪp/ BrE AmE verb (past tense and past participle ripped, present participle ripping)
[Date: 1300-1400; Origin: Probably from Flemish rippen 'to tear off roughly']
1. [intransitive and transitive] to tear something or be torn quickly and violently:
Her clothes had all been ripped.
The sails ripped under the force of the wind.
Impatiently, Sue ripped the letter open.
2. [transitive always + adverb/preposition] to remove something quickly and violently, using your hands
rip something out/off/away/down
Gilly ripped out a sheet of paper from her notebook.
The buttons had been ripped off.
3. rip something/somebody to shreds
a) to destroy something or damage it badly by tearing it in many places:
Jill’s kitten is ripping her sofa to shreds.
b) informal to strongly criticize someone, or criticize their opinions, remarks, behaviour etc:
I expected to have my argument ripped to shreds.
4. [transitive] to copy music from a CD to an ↑MP3 player or computer
5. let rip informal to speak or behave violently or emotionally:
Fran took a slow deep breath, then let rip, yelling and shouting at him.
6. let it/her rip informal to make a car, boat etc go as fast as it can:
Put your foot on the gas and let her rip!
rip something ↔ apart phrasal verb
to tear or pull something to pieces:
He was ripped apart by savage beasts in the forest.
rip somebody/something ↔ off phrasal verb informal
1. to charge someone too much money for something SYN overcharge:
The agency really ripped us off.
2. to steal something:
Somebody had come in and ripped off the TV and stereo.
3. to take words, ideas etc from someone else’s work and use them in your own work as if they were your own ideas SYN plagiarize
⇨ ↑rip-off(2)
• • •
THESAURUS
tear to damage paper or cloth by pulling it too hard, or letting it touch something sharp: She unwrapped the present carefully, trying not to tear the paper. | I tore a hole in my jacket, climbing over the fence.
rip to tear something quickly or violently: Beth excitedly ripped open the package. | Stop pulling my dress! You’ll rip it!
split to tear your trousers or shirt when you put them on, because they are too tight for you: He bent down and split his trousers. | Oh no, now I’ve split my shirt.
ladder British English if a woman ladders her ↑tights or STOCKINGS, she tears them so that a long thin line appears in them: Damn! I’ve laddered my tights!
snag to catch a piece of clothing on something rough or sharp so that it tears slightly: I snagged my shirt on a nail.
shred to deliberately destroy letters, documents etc by cutting them into thin pieces, often by using a special machine: In order to prevent fraud, it’s best to shred your bank statements. | I went through all my papers shredding things I didn’t need.
frayed torn a little along the edges – used about clothes, carpets etc that have been used a lot: He was wearing an old pair of frayed jeans. | The rug was a little frayed around the edges. | The jacket was a little frayed at the cuffs.
rip on somebody/something phrasal verb American English informal
to complain a lot about someone or something
rip through something phrasal verb
to move through a place quickly and with violent force:
A wave of bombings ripped through the capital’s business district.
rip something ↔ up phrasal verb
to tear something into pieces:
Sue ripped his photo up into tiny bits.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

rip

rip [rip rips ripped ripping] verb, noun   [rɪp]    [rɪp] 

verb (-pp-)
1. transitive, intransitive to tear sth or to become torn, often suddenly or violently
~ (sth) I ripped my jeans on the fence.
The flags had been ripped in two.
The nail ripped a hole in my jacket.
• I heard the tent rip.

~ sth + adj. She ripped the letter open.

2. transitive ~ sth + adv./prep. to remove sth quickly or violently, often by pulling it
He ripped off his tie.
• The carpet had been ripped from the stairs.

• Half of the house was ripped away in the explosion.

 

3. transitive ~ sth (computing) to copy sound or video files from a website or CD on to a computer

4. (computing) =  rasterize 
more at tear/rip the heart out of sth at  heart, tear/rip sb limb from limb at  limb 
 
Word Origin:
v. and n. sense 1 late Middle English reap
n. sense 2 late 18th cent. rip
 
Example Bank:
A huge fire ripped through the factory.
He ripped open the plastic bag.
I ripped my coat on a nail.
The dog had ripped a cushion to shreds.
The hounds fell on the fox and ripped it apart.
He ripped up the letter.
She'll rip you to pieces if you try to keep her cub from her.
The flag had been ripped in two
countries ripped apart by fighting
Idioms: let rip  let something rip  rip somebody to to bits

Derived: rip at something  rip into somebody  rip somebody off  rip something off  rip something up 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

rip / rɪp / verb ( -pp- ) (TEAR)

B2 [ I or T ] to pull apart; to tear or be torn violently and quickly:

His new trousers ripped when he bent down.

I ripped my shirt on a nail.

[ + obj + adj ] She excitedly ripped the parcel open .

The wind ripped the flag to/into shreds (= into little pieces) .

C1 [ T + adv/prep ] to remove something quickly, without being careful:

I wish the old fireplaces hadn't been ripped out .

We ripped up the carpets and laid a new wooden floor.
 

rip / rɪp / verb [ T ] ( -pp- ) (COPY)

to copy pictures or sounds from a CD or DVD onto a computer:

How do I rip a DVD movie to my hard drive?

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

rip

/rɪp/
(rips, ripping, ripped)

1.
When something rips or when you rip it, you tear it forcefully with your hands or with a tool such as a knife.
I felt the banner rip as we were pushed in opposite directions...
I tried not to rip the paper as I unwrapped it.
= tear
VERB: V, V n

2.
A rip is a long cut or split in something made of cloth or paper.
Looking at the rip in her new dress, she flew into a rage.
= tear
N-COUNT

3.
If you rip something away, you remove it quickly and forcefully.
He ripped away a wire that led to the alarm button...
He ripped the phone from her hand.
= tear
VERB: V n with adv, V n prep

4.
If something rips into someone or something or rips through them, it enters that person or thing so quickly and forcefully that it often goes completely through them.
A volley of bullets ripped into the facing wall...
= tear
VERB: V prep/adv

5.
If you let rip, you do something forcefully and without trying to control yourself. (INFORMAL)
Turn the guitars up full and let rip...
PHRASE: let inflects

6.
If you let something rip, you do it as quickly or as forcefully as possible. You can say ‘let it rip’ or ‘let her rip’ to someone when you want them to make a vehicle go as fast as it possibly can.
The ecological disaster is partly a product of letting everything rip in order to increase production.
PHRASE: let inflects
 

rip off

If someone rips you off, they cheat you by charging you too much money for something or by selling you something that is broken or damaged. (INFORMAL)
The Consumer Federation claims banks are ripping you off by not passing along savings on interest rates...
The airlines have been accused of ripping off customers.

PHRASAL VERB: V n P, V P n (not pron)

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1rip /ˈrɪp/ verb rips; ripped; rip·ping
1 a [+ obj] : to tear, split, or open (something) quickly or violently
• She ripped the fabric in half.
• He ripped open the package.
• The dog ripped the pillow to shreds/pieces.
• The dog ripped a hole [=made a hole] in the pillow.
• The force of the explosion ripped a hole in the wall.
b [no obj] : to become torn or split
• Her coat ripped when it caught on the doorknob.
• The seam has ripped.
2 always followed by an adverb or preposition [+ obj] : to remove (something) quickly or violently
• I ripped the poster off the wall.
• The sink had been ripped from the wall.
• He ripped the page out of the magazine.
• She ripped off her mask.
• He ripped the letter from my hands.
3 [no obj] : to go or move very quickly through or into something
• The fire ripped through the forest.
• an epidemic that ripped through the region
• The bullet ripped into her leg.
4 [+ obj] : to criticize (someone or something) in a very harsh or angry way
• (US) The coach ripped [=ripped into] his team for their sloppy play.
• His latest movie was ripped to shreds/pieces by the critics.
let rip informal
1 : to do something in a way that is full of anger or energy
• For the concert finale, the band let rip with a fantastic version of the song that made them famous.
• I don't think anyone expected the senator to let rip at the press conference like that. [=to speak in such an angry way]
2 let (something) rip : to make (a car, boat, machine, etc.) go very fast - usually used in phrases like let it rip and let her/'er rip
• Once we got the boat out into the open water, we let it rip.
rip apart [phrasal verb]
1 rip (something) apart or rip apart (something) : to completely destroy (something) by tearing it into pieces
• The child ripped the toy apart.
• Strong winds had ripped apart many of the little beach bungalows.
- often used figuratively
• a tragedy/scandal that almost ripped the family apart
2 rip (someone or something) apart or rip apart (someone or something) : to criticize (someone or something) in a very harsh or angry way especially by describing weaknesses, flaws, etc.
• Critics ripped the author's latest novel apart.
• an article that rips apart the mayor's plan
rip into [phrasal verb] rip into (someone or something) : to criticize (someone or something) in a very harsh or angry way
• The coach ripped into [=tore into] the team after the game.
• She ripped into the band's last performance.
rip off [phrasal verb] informal
1 rip (someone) off or rip off (someone) : to steal from or cheat (someone)
• Hundreds of people were ripped off in a scam involving two people who claimed to be collecting money for disaster victims.
• The store had been ripping customers off for years.
• I wasn't trying to rip you off. I thought $50 was a fair price.
2 rip (something) off or rip off (something)
a : to steal (something)
• The organization's treasurer ripped off almost $6,000 before being caught.
• Somebody ripped off [=stole] all our equipment. = All our equipment got ripped off. [=stolen]
b disapproving : to copy or imitate (something) improperly : to make something that is too much like (something made by someone else)
• The film has done well, but its makers have been accused of ripping off another movie made 30 years ago.
- see also rip-off
rip up [phrasal verb] rip (something) up or rip up (something) : to completely destroy (something) by tearing it into pieces
• He ripped up the letter.

mourning

mourning [noun]

great sadness felt because someone has died

US /ˈmɔːr.nɪŋ/ 
UK /ˈmɔː.nɪŋ/ 

سوگوارى، عزادارى

مثال: 

Shops will be closed today as a sign of mourning for the king.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

mourning

mourning /ˈmɔːnɪŋ $ ˈmɔːr-/ BrE AmE noun [uncountable]
1. great sadness because someone has died:
The Armenian authorities declared May 29 a national day of mourning.
in mourning (=feeling great sadness)
It was the custom to visit those in mourning and sit quietly with them.
2. black clothes worn to show that you are very sad that someone has died:
She was recently widowed and wearing mourning.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

mourning

mourn·ing [mourning]   [ˈmɔːnɪŋ]    [ˈmɔːrnɪŋ]  noun uncountable
1. sadness that you show and feel because sb has died
Syn:  grief
• The government announced a day of national mourning for the victims.

• She was still in mourning for her husband.

2. clothes that people wear to show their sadness at sb's death
The queen was dressed in mourning.  
Example Bank:
She was still in full mourning six months after her son's death.
• a day of mourning for the victims of the tragedy

• The government has announced a day of national mourning for the victims.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

mourning / ˈmɔː.nɪŋ /   / ˈmɔːr- / noun [ U ]

great sadness felt because someone has died:

Shops will be closed today as a sign of mourning for the king.

He was in mourning for his wife.

the usually black clothes that are worn in some countries as an expression of sadness about someone's death a loud crying that people in some countries make when someone dies:

The mourning could be heard all day and all night.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

mourning

[mɔ͟ː(r)nɪŋ]
 1) N-UNCOUNT Mourning is behaviour in which you show sadness about a person's death.
  The period of mourning and bereavement may be long...
  Expect to feel angry, depressed and confused. It's all part of the mourning process...
  Human rights groups declared what they called a day of mourning and protest.
 2) PHRASE: usu v-link PHR If you are in mourning, you are dressed or behaving in a particular way because someone you love or respect has died.
  Yesterday the whole of Greece was in mourning...
  The boys wore black tail coats in mourning for George III.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

mourning

mourn·ing /ˈmoɚnɪŋ/ noun [noncount]
1 : the act of mourning for someone who has died
• a day of national mourning
• She is still in mourning for her dead husband.
• The whole town was in mourning.
• She went into mourning for her dead husband. [=she began to mourn for her dead husband]
2 : great sadness felt because someone has died
• a period of deep mourning
3 : black clothing that is worn to show that you are mourning for someone who has died
• His widow was dressed in mourning.

comment

comment [verb]

to make a comment

US /ˈkɑː.ment/ 
UK /ˈkɒm.ent/ 

اظهار نظر كردن‌، نظر دادن‌

مثال: 

My ​mum always comments on what I'm ​wearing.

مادر من همیشه نسبت به چیزی که می پوشم نظر می دهد.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

comment

 verb (comments, commenting, commented)
to say what you think about something:
A lot of people at school commented on my new watch.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

II. comment2 S3 W3 AC BrE AmE verb [intransitive and transitive]
[Word Family: noun: ↑comment, ↑commentary; verb: ↑comment]
to express an opinion about someone or something SYN remark
comment on
People were always commenting on his size.
comment that
Smith’s lawyer commented that the decision was ‘outrageous’.
• • •
THESAURUS
■ to say something
say to tell someone something, using words: ‘I really ought to go,’ she said. | Lauren said she’d probably be late.
state to say something, especially in a definite or formal way – used in official contexts: The witness stated that he had never seen the woman before. | Please state your name and address.
announce to publicly tell people about something: The chairman announced his resignation. | The results will be announced tomorrow. | We will announce the winners next Sunday. | They were announcing the train times over the loudspeaker system.
declare to say something very firmly: ‘My personal life is none of your business,’ she declared.
mention to talk about someone or something, especially without giving many details: Did Tom mention anything about what happened at school? | Your name was mentioned!
express to let someone know your feelings by putting them into words: Young children often find it difficult to express their emotions.
comment to say what your opinion is about someone or something: The prime minister was asked to comment on the crisis.
note/remark formal to say that you have noticed that something is true – used especially in formal writing: We have already noted that most old people live alone. | Someone once remarked that the problem with computers is that they only give you answers.
add to say something more, after what has already been said: He added that he thought it could be done fairly cheaply.
point out to mention something that seems particularly important or relevant: Dr Graham points out that most children show some signs of abnormal behaviour. | It’s worth pointing out that few people actually die of this disease.
air to talk about your opinions, worries, or the things you disagree about: air your views/grievances/differences: The programme will give listeners the chance to air their views about immigration. | Workers were able to air their grievances.
voice to talk publicly about your feelings or about whether you approve or disapprove of something formal: voice concern/support/doubt/fears etc: The president has already voiced his support for the proposal. | She voiced concern for the safety of the hostages.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

verb intransitive, transitive ~ (on/upon sth)
to express an opinion about sth
I don't feel I can comment on their decision.
He refused to comment until after the trial.
We were just commenting on how well you look.
~ that… A spokesperson commented that levels of carbon dioxide were very high.
+ speech ‘Not his best performance,’ she commented to the woman sitting next to her.
Verb forms:

 
Word Origin:
late Middle English (in the sense ‘explanatory piece of writing’): from Latin commentum ‘contrivance’ (in late Latin also ‘interpretation’), neuter past participle of comminisci ‘devise’.  
Thesaurus:
comment verb I, T
They commented on how well she looked.
remark|formal observenote
comment/remark on sth
comment/remark/observe to sb
comment/remark/observe/note that…
Comment, remark or observe? You can only use refuse to with comment:
He refused to comment until after the trial.
 ¤ He refused to remark/observe until after the trial.  
Synonyms:
comment
note remark observe
These words all mean to say or write a fact or opinion.
commentto express an opinion or give facts about sth: He refused to comment until after the trial.
note(rather formal) to mention sth because it is important or interesting: He noted in passing that the company's record on safety issues was not good.
remarkto say or write what you have noticed about a situation: Critics remarked that the play was not original.
observe(formal) to say or write what you have noticed about a situation: She observed that it was getting late.
comment, remark or observe?
If you comment on sth you say sth about it; if you remark on sth or observe sth, you say sth about it that you have noticed: there is often not much difference between the three. However, while you can refuse to comment (without on), you cannot ‘refuse to remark’ or ‘refuse to observe’ (without on): He refused to remark/observe until after the trial.
to comment/note/remark/observe that…
to comment on/note/remark/observe how…
to comment/remark on sth
to comment/remark/observe to sb
‘It's long,’ he commented/noted/remarked/observed. 
Example Bank:
He commented favourably on the proposals.
He refused to comment on the proposals.
• People were commenting about her abilities.

• She commented to me that she liked it.

 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

comment / ˈkɒm.ent /   / ˈkɑː.ment / verb [ I or T ]

B2 to make a comment:

My mum always comments on what I'm wearing.

[ + that ] He commented that the two essays were rather similar.

The official refused to/declined to comment on the matter.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

comment

[kɒ̱ment]
 
 comments, commenting, commented
 1) VERB If you comment on something, you give your opinion about it or you give an explanation for it.
  [V on n/wh] So far, Mr Cook has not commented on these reports...
  [V on n/wh] Stratford police refuse to comment on whether anyone has been arrested...
  You really can't comment till you know the facts...
  [V with quote] `I'm always happy with new developments,' he commented...
  [V that] Stuart commented that this was very true.
 2) N-VAR A comment is something that you say which expresses your opinion of something or which gives an explanation of it.
  He made his comments at a news conference in Amsterdam...
  I was wondering whether you had any comments about that?...
  There's been no comment so far from police about the allegations...
  Lady Thatcher, who is abroad, was not available for comment.
 3) N-SING: usu a N on n If an event or situation is a comment on something, it reveals something about that thing, usually something bad.
  He argues that family problems are typically a comment on some unresolved issues in the family.
  Syn:
  reflection
 4) CONVENTION People say `no comment' as a way of refusing to answer a question, usually when it is asked by a journalist.
  No comment. I don't know anything.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

comment

2comment verb -ments; -ment·ed; -ment·ing : to make a statement about someone or something : to make a comment

[no obj]

• When asked about his involvement in the scandal, he refused/declined to comment.
- usually + on
• Several people have commented on my new dress.
• He declined to comment on the matter.

[+ obj]

• She commented that the service seemed slow.
• “The service seems slow today,” she commented. [=remarked]

don't give up the day job

don't give up the day job [idiom]

used to tell someone that you think they are not really good at something and they shouldn’t invest in it.

این اصطلاح زمانی استفاده میشود که میخواهیم به کسی بگوییم در انجام کاری خوب نیست و بهتر است روی انجام آن به عنوان شغل اصلی خود حساب باز نکند.

Usage: 
don't give up the day job

بیخیال انجام کار (جدیدی) شدن، کار قبلی خود را ادامه دادن

مثال: 

You obviously like playing the piano and seem to be enjoying it but I think you shouldn’t really give up the day job, Mary.

کاملاً واضحه پیانو زدن رو دوست داری و داری ازش لذت میبری ولی به نظر من پیانو رو بیخیال شو مری.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

don't give up the day job  (informal ,humorous) 

used to tell sb that they should continue doing what they are used to, rather than trying sth new which they are likely to fail at
ٍExample: So you want to be a writer? Well my advice is, don't give up the day job.
 

Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, 8th edition

© Oxford University Press, 2010

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

don't give up the day job! humorous

used for telling someone that you do not think they are very good at something:

'What did you think of my singing, then?' 'Er, don't give up the day job!'

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
© Cambridge University Press 2013

nap

nap [verb]

to sleep for a short time, especially during the day

US /næp/ 
UK /næp/ 

چرت‌ زدن‌

مثال: 

I tried to nap on the plane. 

سعی کردم داخل هواپیما چرت بزنم.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

II. nap2 BrE AmE verb (past tense and past participle napped, present participle napping) [intransitive]
[Language: Old English; Origin: hnappian]
1. be caught napping informal to not be ready to deal with something when it happens, although you should be ready for it:
The German team were caught napping and Lampard scored the winning goal.
2. to sleep for a short time during the day

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

verb (-pp-) intransitive
to sleep for a short time, especially during the day
I tried to nap on the plane.
see catch sb napping at  catch 
Verb forms:
 
Word Origin:
n. sense 1 and v. Old English hnappian Germanic
n. sense 2 late Middle English noppe Middle Dutch Middle Low German noppe ‘nap’ noppen ‘trim the nap from’
n. sense 3 early 19th cent. napoleon
 
Example Bank:
During the flight you are advised to nap if possible.
• Studies show that napping at work can help keep you alert and refreshed.

• Try not to nap during the day.

 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

nap / næp / verb [ I ] ( -pp- )

to sleep for a short time, especially during the day:

He likes to nap for an hour when he gets home from work.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

nap

[næ_p]
 naps, napping, napped
 1) N-COUNT If you have a nap, you have a short sleep, usually during the day.
  Use your lunch hour to have a nap in your chair...
  I might take a little nap.
  Syn:
  snooze
 2) VERB If you nap, you sleep for a short period of time, usually during the day.
  An elderly person may nap during the day and then sleep only five hours a night.
  Syn:
  doze
 3) N-SING The nap of a carpet or of a cloth such as velvet is the top layer of short threads, which usually lie smoothly in one direction.
 4) PHRASE: V inflects If someone is caught napping, something happens when they are not prepared for it, although they should have been. [INFORMAL]
  The security services were clearly caught napping.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

2nap verb naps; napped; nap·ping [no obj]
1 : to sleep for a short period of time especially during the day
• He's napping [=dozing] on the couch.
2 : to be in a state in which you are not prepared to deal with something because you were not paying attention
• The goalie had to be napping when that ball got by him.
• When the problem appeared again, the government was caught napping. [=the government was not prepared to deal with it]

 

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