adjective

best

best [adjective]

Of the highest quality, or being the most suitable, pleasing, or effective type of thing or person

US /best/ 
UK /best/ 

بهترین

مثال: 

That's the best movie I've ever seen! 

آهنگ وترانه: 
You Are The Reason - Chris De Burgh

Oxford Essential Dictionary

adjective (good, better, best)
better than all others:
This is the best ice cream I have ever eaten!
Tom is my best friend.
Jo's the best player on the team.
 opposite worst

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

best

I. best1 S1 W1 /best/ BrE AmE adjective [superlative of good]
[Language: Old English; Origin: betst]
1. better than anything else or anyone else in quality, skill, how effective it is etc:
He won the best actor award.
What’s the best way to cook this fish?
The best thing to do is to stop worrying.
it’s best to do something
It’s best to go later in the season.
easily the best/by far the best (=much better than anything else)
John’s idea is by far the best option.
Our pilots are given the best possible training.
We use only the very best ingredients.
2. best friend the friend that you know and like better than anyone else:
She was my best friend in college.
3. best dress/shoes/clothes etc clothing that you keep for special occasions:
I put on my best suit for the wedding.
4. the next best thing something that is not exactly what you want but is as similar to it as possible:
If sterile equipment isn’t available, the next best thing is to clean equipment with disinfectant.
5. best of all used to introduce the fact about a situation that is even better than the other good things:
It’s clean and well-located, but best of all, it’s affordable.
6. best before British English written on food packets with the date that the food should be eaten before:
Best before 13 July.
a best-before date
be on your best behaviour at ↑behaviour(2), ⇨ your best bet at ↑bet2(2), ⇨ the best/better part of at ↑part1(6)
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ adverbs
the very best He’s one of the very best players around.
easily the best The series was easily the best TV drama this year.
by far the best One girl stood out as by far the best singer.
■ adjectives
the best possible We sold the house at the best possible time.
the best available The tuition we offer here is the best available.
■ nouns
the best way to do/of doing something The best way to learn a language is to live in a country where it is spoken.
the best thing to do The best thing to do is to apologize immediately.
the best way forward (=the best way to make progress or deal with a problem) We believe that a merger is the best way forward for the business.
make the best use of something Making the best use of space is important in any room.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

best

best [best bests bested besting] adjective, adverb, noun, verb   [best]    [best] 

adjective (superlative of good)
1. of the most excellent type or quality
That's the best movie I've ever seen!
He wrote his best songs before he was 25.
She was one of the best tennis players of her generation.
Is that your best suit?
They've been best friends (= closest friends) since they were children.
the company's best-ever results

• We want the kids to have the best possible education.

2. most enjoyable; happiest

• Those were the best years of my life.

3. most suitable or appropriate
What's the best way to cook steak?
The best thing to do would be to apologize.
He's the best man for the job.
It's best if you go now.

• I'm not in the best position to advise you.

Rem: Idioms containing best adj. are at the entries for the nouns and verbs in the idioms, for example on your best behaviour is at behaviour.  
Word Origin:
Old English betest (adjective), betost, betst (adverb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch and German best, also to better.  
Thesaurus:
best adj.
the best way to cook steak
It's best if you go now.
idealoptimumwisesensiblepreferred|formal desirableadvisable|formal, BrE favoured|formal, AmE favored
Opp: worst
be best/wise/sensible/desirable/advisable to do sth
the best/the optimum/a wise/a sensible/an ideal/the preferred choice
the best/a wise/a sensible thing to do  
Example Bank:
Owen judged it best to make no reply.
This is by far the best restaurant in the town.
We aim to give our guests the very best attention.
Who in the class is best at history?
He's the best man for the job.
I'm not in the best position to advise you.
It's best if you go now.
• What's the best way to cook steak?

Idioms: all the best  as best you can  at best  best of a bad bunch  best of three/five  best that money can buy  do/mean something for the best  for the best  get the best of something  make the best of a bad job  make the best of it  make the best of things  the best of your belief  with the best 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

best / best / adjective

A1 of the highest quality, or being the most suitable, pleasing, or effective type of thing or person:

This is the best meal I've ever had.

He's one of our best students.

Are you sure this is the best way of doing it?

What's the best (= shortest or quickest) way to get to the station?

Your parents only want what is best for you.

She was my best friend (= the friend I liked most) .

It's best (= it is wise) to get to the supermarket early.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

best

/best/

Frequency: The word is one of the 700 most common words in English.

1.
Best is the superlative of good.
If you want further information the best thing to do is have a word with the driver as you get on the bus...
It’s not the best place to live if you wish to develop your knowledge and love of mountains.

2.
Best is the superlative of well.
James Fox is best known as the author of White Mischief.

3.
The best is used to refer to things of the highest quality or standard.
We offer only the best to our clients...
He’ll have the best of care.
worst
N-SING: the N

4.
Someone’s best is the greatest effort or highest achievement or standard that they are capable of.
Miss Blockey was at her best when she played the piano...
One needs to be a first-class driver to get the best out of that sort of machinery.
N-SING: oft poss N

5.
If you say that something is the best that can be done or hoped for, you think it is the most pleasant, successful, or useful thing that can be done or hoped for.
A draw seems the best they can hope for...
The best we can do is try to stay cool and muddle through.
N-SING: the N

6.
If you like something best or like it the best, you prefer it.
The thing I liked best about the show was the music...
Mother liked it best when Daniel got money...
What was the role you loved the best?
= most
ADV: ADV after v, oft the ADV

7.
Best is used to form the superlative of compound adjectives beginning with ‘good’ and ‘well’. For example, the superlative of ‘well-known’ is ‘best-known’.

8.
see also second best, Sunday best

9.
You can say ‘All the best’ when you are saying goodbye to someone, or at the end of a letter.
Wish him all the best, and tell him we miss him.
CONVENTION [formulae]

10.
You use best of all to indicate that what you are about to mention is the thing that you prefer or that has most advantages out of all the things you have mentioned.
It was comfortable and cheap: best of all, most of the rent was being paid by two American friends.
PHRASE: PHR with cl/group

11.
If someone does something as best they can, they do it as well as they can, although it is very difficult.
The older people were left to carry on as best they could.
PHRASE: V inflects, PHR after v

12.
You use at best to indicate that even if you describe something as favourably as possible or if it performs as well as it possibly can, it is still not very good.
This policy, they say, is at best confused and at worst non-existent...
PHRASE: PHR with cl/group

13.
If you do your best or try your best to do something, you try as hard as you can to do it, or do it as well as you can.
I’ll do my best to find out...
It wasn’t her fault, she was trying her best to help...
PHRASE: V inflects, oft PHR to-inf

14.
If you say that something is for the best, you mean it is the most desirable or helpful thing that could have happened or could be done, considering all the circumstances.
Whatever the circumstances, parents are supposed to know what to do for the best.
PHRASE: PHR after v, v-link PHR

15.
If two people are the best of friends, they are close friends, especially when they have had a disagreement or fight in the past.
Magda is now married to George Callerby and we are the best of friends.
PHRASE: usu v-link PHR

16.
If you say that a particular person knows best, you mean that they have a lot of experience and should therefore be trusted to make decisions for other people.
He was convinced that doctors and dentists knew best.
PHRASE: V inflects

17.
If you make the best of something, you accept an unsatisfactory situation cheerfully and try to manage as well as you can. In British English, you can also say that you make the best of a bad job.
She instilled in the children the virtues of good hard work, and making the best of what you have.
PHRASE: V inflects

18.
to the best of your ability: see ability
to hope for the best: see hope
to the best of your knowledge: see knowledge
best of luck: see luck
the best part: see part
at the best of times: see time
the best of both worlds: see world

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1best /ˈbɛst/ adj superlative form of 1good or of 2well
1 a : better than all others in quality or value
• You should wear your best clothes tonight.
• He took us to the (very) best restaurants in the city.
• We ate the best food and drank the best wines.
• You're our best customers.
• His modesty and sense of humor are his best qualities.
• Is that your best offer?
• I've had the best time with you! [=I've had a very enjoyable time with you]
• The best [=most valuable] things in life are free.
• Which of these do you think tastes best?
• Mary sends you her very best wishes/regards.
• He's my best friend. [=my closest/dearest friend] = He and I are best friends.
b : most skillful, talented, or successful
• She's the best student in her class.
• He won the award for best actor in a drama.
• the team's best player
2 : most appropriate, useful, or helpful
• She truly believes that this is the best way to solve the problem.
• She's the team's best hope/chance for a medal.
• She thought waiting was best. = She thought that the best thing to do was to wait. = She thought that it was best to wait.
• It's best to leave early if you want to be sure of arriving on time.
• We want to do what's best for you.
• He's the best man for the job.
• You should do whatever you think is the best thing to do. = You should do whatever you think best.
• We're making the best possible use of these materials.
best of all
✦The phrase best of all is often used to refer to the most important or appealing part of something that has many good parts.
• The machine is easy to use, easy to clean, and best of all, it's absolutely free when you order these books.
next best
✦A person or thing that is next best is not as good as the best person or thing but is better than all others.
• The shortstop is the best player on the team, and the catcher is the next best player.
• We can't see each other often, but calling each other on the telephone is the next best thing.
on your best behavior
✦If you are on your best behavior you are behaving very politely and well.
• Remember to be on your best behavior with your grandmother.
• The children promised to be on their best behavior.

online

online [adjective]

Describes products, services, or information that can be bought or used on the internet

US /ˈɑːn.laɪn/ 
UK /ˈɒn.laɪn/ 

آنلاین

مثال: 

An online newspaper/magazine/dictionary

Oxford Essential Dictionary

online

 adjective, adverb
using a computer or the Internet:
Online shopping is both cheap and convenient.
Bookings can be made online.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

online

online /ˈɒnlaɪn $ ˈɑːn-, ˈɒːn-/ BrE AmE adjective
1. connected to other computers through the Internet, or available through the Internet OPP offline:
All the city’s schools will be online by the end of the year.
2. directly connected to or controlled by a computer OPP offline:
an online printer
—online adverb:
The reports are not available online yet.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

online

I. on·line [online]   [ˌɒnˈlaɪn]    [ˌɑːnˈlaɪn]    [ˌɔːnˈlaɪn]  adjective
controlled by or connected to a computer or to the Internet
Online shopping is both cheap and convenient.
an online database
online dating (= using the Internet to meet people in order to start a romantic relationship)  
Collocations:
Email and the Internet
Email
receive/get/open an email
write/send/answer/forward/delete an email
check/read/access your email
block/filter (out) junk/spam/unsolicited email
exchange email addresses
open/check your inbox
junk mail fills/floods/clogs your inbox
have/set up an email account
open/send/contain an attachment
sign up for/receive email alerts
Connecting to the Internet
use/access/log onto the Internet/the Web
go online/on the Internet
have a high-speed/dial-up/broadband/wireless (Internet) connection
access/connect to/locate the server
use/open/close/launch a/your web browser
browse/surf/search/scour the Internet/the Web
send/contain/spread/detect a (computer/email) virus
update your anti-virus software
install/use/configure a firewall
accept/enable/block/delete cookies
Using the Internet
visit/check a website/an Internet site/sb's blog
create/design/launch a website/social networking site
start/write/post/read a blog
update your blog/a website
be in/meet sb in/go into/enter an Internet chat room
download/upload music/software/a song/a podcast/a file/a copy of sth
share information/data/files
post a comment/message on a website/an online message board/a web forum/an internet chat room
stream video/audio/music/content over the Internet
join/participate in/visit/provide a (web-based/web/online/Internet/discussion) forum

generate/increase/monitor Internet traffic

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

online / ˈɒn.laɪn /   / ˈɑːn.laɪn / adjective [ before noun ]

A2 describes products, services, or information that can be bought or used on the internet:

an online newspaper/magazine/dictionary

online banking/shopping

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

online

 

/ɒnlaɪn/
also on-line

1.
If a company goes online, its services become available on the Internet. (BUSINESS, COMPUTING)
...the first bank to go online.
...an online shopping centre.
...an online catalogue.
ADJ

2.
If you are online, your computer is connected to the Internet. Compare offline. (COMPUTING)
You can chat to other people who are online.
ADJ

Online is also an adverb.
...the cool stuff you find online.
on line: see line
ADV: ADV after v

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

online

on·line /ˈɑːnˌlaɪn/ adj
1 : connected to a computer, a computer network, or the Internet
• an online printer
• The city libraries are all online.
2 : done over the Internet
• He likes to engage in online chats/discussions.
online shopping/banking
• the company's online sales
- opposite off-line
- online adv
• people who shop/chat online
• I went online to do a search for information about new cars.
• She spends a lot of her free time online.

sports

sports [adjective]

Relating to sport

US /spɔːrts/ 
UK /spɔːts/ 

ورزشی

مثال: 

Sports equipment

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

sport

I. sport1 S2 W2 /spɔːt $ spɔːrt/ BrE AmE noun
[Word Family: adjective: ↑sporting, ↑unsporting, ↑sporty; verb: ↑sport; noun: ↑sport]
[Date: 1300-1400; Origin: disport]
1. GAMES
a) [countable] a physical activity in which people compete against each other:
My favourite sports are tennis and swimming.
a sports team
All students are encouraged to take part in a sport.
He picked up the newspaper and turned to the sports pages.
b) [uncountable] British English sports in general:
Why is there so much sport on TV?
I always hated sport at school.
GRAMMAR
The uncountable use of sport is British English only:
▪ I’m not interested in sport. In American English, the plural sports is used:
▪ He likes watching sports on TV.
2. HUNTING [countable] an activity that people do in the countryside, especially hunting or fishing:
the sport of falconry
a demonstration by people opposed to blood sports (=sports that involve killing animals)
3. HELPFUL PERSON [countable usually singular] (also good sport) old-fashioned a helpful cheerful person who lets you enjoy yourself
be a sport (=used when asking someone to help you)
Be a sport and lend me your bike.
4. a good sport someone who does not get angry when they lose at a game or sport
5. a bad/poor sport someone who gets angry very easily when they lose at a game or sport
6. MAN/BOY spoken
a) Australian English used when speaking to someone, especially a man, in a friendly way:
See you later, sport.
b) American English old-fashioned used when speaking to a boy in a friendly way
7. FUN [uncountable] old-fashioned fun or amusement:
Did she torment him merely for sport?
8. make sport of somebody old-fashioned to joke about someone in a way that makes them seem stupid
⇨ ↑field sports, ↑water sports, ↑winter sports
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ verbs
play (a) sport My ambition was to play sport at the highest level.
take part in (a) sport Students are encouraged to take part in a sport of some kind.
do sport British English, do sports American English I did a lot of sport at school.
take up a sport (=start doing it) I took up the sport six years ago.
compete in a sport (=do that sport in competitions) She competed in various sports when she was young.
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + sport
a team sport I liked playing team sports such as football and rugby.
an individual sport You have to be mentally tough to compete in individual sports.
a spectator sport (=one that people enjoy watching) Football is the most popular spectator sport.
competitive sport(s) (=in which people compete and try to win) Competitive sport teaches valuable lessons which last for life.
a contact sport (=one in which players have physical contact with each other) People get hurt in contact sports, but they also have fun.
a winter sport (=skiing, ice skating etc) More and more people are taking up winter sports.
an extreme sport (=one that is dangerous) Many teenagers are attracted to extreme sports such as snowboarding.
professional sport(s) (=which people are paid to do) The kind of money involved in professional sport makes cheating inevitable.
a minority sport (=one that very few people do) Minority sports rarely feature on TV.
■ sports + NOUN
a sports team A lot of schools have their own sports teams.
a sports club She joined her local sports club.
a sports field/ground The village has its own sports field.
a sports event Is this country able to stage a major sports event?
a sports fan (=someone who enjoys watching sport) He was a big sports fan.
a sports personality (=someone who is famous for playing sport) The event will be opened by a well-known sports personality.
sports facilities All our holiday camps have wonderful sports facilities.
sports equipment a new online store selling all kinds of sports equipment
a sports injury The clinic specializes in treating sports injuries.
■ COMMON ERRORS
► Do not say 'make (a) sport'. Say do (a) sport or play (a) sport.
• • •
THESAURUS
■ places where people do sport
field (also pitch British English) a large area of ground, usually covered with grass, where team sports are played: A few kids were playing on the football field. | a hockey field
stadium a large sports field with seats all around it for people to watch team sports or track and field competitions: The atmosphere in the Olympic Stadium was amazing. | a football stadium
ground British English a sports field and the seats and buildings around it, belonging to a particular football, rugby, or cricket team: I met my friends inside the ground.
ballpark/park American English a stadium where baseball is played: Busch Stadium is one of the newest ballparks in Major League.
court an area with lines painted on the ground, for tennis, badminton, basketball, or volleyball: The hotel has four tennis courts and a volleyball court.
diamond the area in a baseball field that is within the shape formed by the four bases. The diamond can also be the whole field: The pitcher stands in the middle of the diamond. | There’s a playground, a picnic area, and a baseball diamond.
track a circular path with lines on it, for running on: In the relay, each runner runs once around the track.
gym a room with machines which you can use to do exercises: He spends an hour in the gym every day.
pool/swimming pool a place where you can swim: He jumped into the deep end of the pool. | I’ll meet you outside the swimming pool.
sports centre British English, sports center American English a building where you can play many types of indoor sports: Why not do exercise classes at your local sports centre?
health club a small sports centre, where you pay to be a member: How much does it cost to join a health club?

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

sport

sport [sport sports sported sporting] noun, verb   [spɔːt]    [spɔːrt]

noun

1. uncountable (BrE) (NAmE sports plural) activity that you do for pleasure and that needs physical effort or skill, usually done in a special area and according to fixed rules
There are excellent facilities for sport and recreation.
• I'm not interested in sport.

• the use of drugs in sport

2. countable a particular form of sport
What's your favourite sport?
team/water sports
• a sports club

see also  blood sport, field sports, spectator sport, winter sports

3. countable (AustralE, NZE, informal) used as a friendly way of addressing sb, especially a man
• How are you doing, sport?

• Good on you, sport!

4. uncountable (formal) enjoyment or fun
The comments were only made in sport.

• to make sport of (= to joke about) sb/sth

5. countable (biology) a plant or an animal that is different in a noticeable way from its usual type 
Word Origin:
late Middle English (in the sense ‘pastime, entertainment’): shortening of disport.  
Culture:
sport and fitness
The British are very fond of sport, but many people prefer to watch rather than take part. Many go to watch football, cricket, etc. at the ground, but many more sit at home and watch sport on television.
Most people today take relatively little general exercise. Over the last 30 or 40 years lifestyles have changed considerably and many people now travel even the shortest distances by car or bus. Lack of exercise combined with eating too many fatty and sugary foods has meant that many people are becoming too fat. Experts are particularly concerned that children spend a lot of their free time watching television or playing computer games instead of being physically active. In recent years, however, there has been a growing interest in fitness among young adults and many belong to a sports club or gym.
In Britain most towns have an amateur football and cricket team, and people also have opportunities to play sports such as tennis and golf. Older people may play bowls. Some people go regularly to a sports centre or leisure centre where there are facilities for playing badminton and squash, and also a swimming pool. Some sports centres arrange classes in aerobics, step and keep-fit. Some people work out (= train hard) regularly at a local gym and do weight training and circuit training. A few people do judo or other martial arts. Others go running or jogging in their local area. For enthusiastic runners there are opportunities to take part in long-distance runs, such as the London marathon. Other people keep themselves fit by walking or cycling. Many people go abroad on a skiing holiday each year and there are several dry slopes and snowdomes in Britain where they can practise.
Membership of a sports club or gym can be expensive and not everyone can afford the subscription. Local sports centres are generally cheaper. Evening classes are also cheap and offer a wide variety of fitness activities ranging from yoga to jazz dancing. Some companies now provide sports facilities for their employees or contribute to the cost of joining a gym.
Sports play an important part in American life. Professional baseball and football games attract large crowds, and many people watch games on television. Although many parents complain about their children being couch potatoes (= people who spend a lot of time watching television), there are sports sessions at school for all ages. College students are usually also required to take physical education classes to complete their studies.
Many popular keep-fit activities began in the US. Charles Atlas, Arnold Schwarzenegger and others inspired people to take up bodybuilding (= strengthening and shaping the muscles). Many women joined the ‘fitness craze’ as a result of video workouts produced by stars such as Jane Fonda and Cindy Crawford which they could watch and take part in at home. New fitness books are continually being published and these create fashions for new types of exercise, such as wave aerobics, which is done in a swimming pool, and cardio kick-boxing, a form of aerobics which involves punching and kicking a punchbag. Many richer people employ their own personal trainer, either at home or at a fitness centre, to direct their exercise programme. Local YMCAs offer programmes which include aerobics, gym, running, weights, treadmills and rowing machines, as well as steam rooms and swimming. But many people just walk or jog in the local park or play informal games of baseball or football. 
Thesaurus:
sport noun
1. U (BrE) (AmE sports)
facilities for sport and recreation
exerciseworkoutaerobics|BrE PE|AmE P. E.
do sport/exercises/a workout/aerobics/PE
2. C
skiing, skating and other winter sports
game
play/take part in a sport/game
team sports/games 
Example Bank:
He does a lot of sport.
I need to take up a sport to get fit.
In the 1960s, the Soviet Union dominated the sport of gymnastics.
In theory, basketball is a non-contact sport.
She has a real passion for sport/sport.
Sports coverage in the local newspaper is good.
The council has allocated an extra £11 million to a new community sports club.
We encourage the children to get involved in sport/sports.
We played sports together when we were kids.
a campaign to promote sport/sports among women
a campaign to promote the sport among young people
government funding for sports programmes/programs for girls and women
popular field sports such as football
sports betting on the Internet
the construction of a new $250-million sports arena
the inherent dangers of adventure sports such as mountaineering
the school sports day
the sport of boxing
Did you do any sport at school?
Did you play any sports in high school?
Do you do a lot of sport?
I'm not interested in sport.
Which is the country's most popular spectator sport?
skiing, skating and other winter sports
• sports shoes

Idiom: a sport 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

sports / spɔːts /   / spɔːrts / adjective [ before noun ]

B1 relating to sport:

sports equipment.

It's the school sports day on Monday.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

sport

/spɔ:(r)t/
(sports)

Frequency: The word is one of the 1500 most common words in English.

1.
Sports are games such as football and basketball and other competitive leisure activities which need physical effort and skill.
I’d say football is my favourite sport...
She excels at sport...
Billy turned on a radio to get the sports news.
N-VAR

2.
If you say that someone is a sport or a good sport, you mean that they cope with a difficult situation or teasing in a cheerful way. (OLD-FASHIONED)
He was accused of having no sense of humor, of not being a good sport.
N-COUNT [approval]

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

sports

sports /ˈspoɚts/ adj always used before a noun : of, relating to, or suitable for sports
• a sports team/fan
• a sports center
• the sports section/pages of the newspaper
sports equipment/facilities
• a sports bra
- compare 2sport

Mexican

Mexican [adjective]

From, belonging to, or relating to Mexico

US /ˈmek.sɪ.kən/ 
UK /ˈmek.sɪ.kən/ 

مکزیکی

مثال: 

The Mexican government

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

Mexican

I. Mexican1 /ˈmeksəkən, ˈmeksɪkən/ BrE AmE adjective
relating to Mexico or its people:
the Mexican government
the Mexican border
Mexican food

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Mexican

Mex·ican 7 [Mexican Mexicans] adjective, noun   [ˈmeksɪkən]    [ˈmeksɪkən]

adjective

from or connected with Mexico

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

Mexican / ˈmek.sɪ.kən / adjective

from, belonging to, or relating to Mexico

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

- Mexican adj
Mexican food/music
Mexican Spanish [=the Spanish spoken in Mexico]

Spanish

Spanish [adjective]

From, belonging to, or relating to Spain

US /ˈspæn.ɪʃ/ 
UK /ˈspæn.ɪʃ/ 

اسپانیایی

مثال: 

Spanish literature

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

Spanish

I. Spanish1 /ˈspænɪʃ/ BrE AmE adjective
relating to Spain, its people, or its language

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Spanish

Span·ish 7 [Spanish] adjective, noun   [ˈspænɪʃ]    [ˈspænɪʃ]

adjective

from or connected with Spain

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

Spanish / ˈspæn.ɪʃ / adjective

from, belonging to, or relating to Spain:

Are you Spanish?

Spanish literature

I met a Spanish person/some Spanish people yesterday.

Spanish customs/food/people

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

- Spanish adj
Spanish art/cooking/culture/territories
• She has a Spanish accent.

brainless

brainless [adjective]

Stupid

US /ˈbreɪn.ləs/ 
UK /ˈbreɪn.ləs/ 

بی مغز

مثال: 

What sort of brainless idiot would do that?

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

brainless

brainless /ˈbreɪnləs/ BrE AmE adjective
completely stupid:
What a brainless thing to do!

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

brainless

brain·less [brainless]   [ˈbreɪnləs]    [ˈbreɪnləs]  adjective
stupid; not able to think or talk in an intelligent way

Her husband's colleagues were brainless bores.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

brainless / ˈbreɪn.ləs / adjective informal

stupid:

What sort of brainless idiot would do that?

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

brainless

/breɪnləs/

If you describe someone or something as brainless, you mean that you think they are stupid.
I got treated as if I was a bit brainless.

= stupid

ADJ [disapproval]

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

brainless
 

brain·less /ˈbreɪnləs/ adj [more ~; most ~] informal : very stupid or silly
• He thought most of his coworkers were brainless.
• The plot of the new movie is brainless and the acting is terrible.
- brain·less·ly adv
- brain·less·ness noun [noncount]

melancholy

melancholy [adjective]

Sad

US /ˈmel.əŋ.kɑː.li/ 
UK /ˈmel.əŋ.kɒl.i/ 

غمگین، اندوهگین

مثال: 

Melancholy autumn days

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

melancholy

I. melancholy1 /ˈmelənkəli $ -kɑːli/ BrE AmE adjective
very sad:
The music suited her melancholy mood.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

adjective
very sad or making you feel sadness
Syn:  mournful, Syn: sombre
melancholy thoughts/memories
The melancholy song died away.  
Word Origin:
Middle English: from Old French melancolie, via late Latin from Greek melankholia, from melas, melan- ‘black’ + kholē ‘bile’, an excess of which was formerly believed to cause depression.  
Example Bank:
She began to feel more and more melancholy.
He was a tall man with a long, melancholy face.
I grew very melancholy and weary.

She was in a melancholy mood.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

melancholy / ˈmel.əŋ.kɒl.i /   / -kɑː.li / adjective

sad:

melancholy autumn days

a melancholy piece of music

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

melancholy

/melənkɒli/

1.
You describe something that you see or hear as melancholy when it gives you an intense feeling of sadness.
The only sounds were the distant, melancholy cries of the sheep...
ADJ

2.
Melancholy is an intense feeling of sadness which lasts for a long time and which strongly affects your behaviour and attitudes. (LITERARY)
I was deeply aware of his melancholy as he stood among the mourners...
N-UNCOUNT

3.
If someone feels or looks melancholy, they feel or look very sad. (LITERARY)
It was in these hours of the late afternoon that Tom Mulligan felt most melancholy...
He fixed me with those luminous, empty eyes and his melancholy smile.
ADJ

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

melancholy

2melancholy adj [more ~; most ~] : feeling or showing sadness : very unhappy
• She was in a melancholy mood.
• He became quiet and melancholy as the hours slowly passed.
melancholy [=sad, depressing] music/thoughts

Brazilian

Brazilian [adjective]

belonging to or relating to Brazil or its people

US /brəˈzɪl.jən/ 
UK /brəˈzɪl.jən/ 

برزیلی، وابسته به کشور برزیل و مردم آن

مثال: 

Brazilian football

فوتبال برزیلی

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

Brazilian

I. Brazilian1 /brəˈzɪliən/ BrE AmE adjective
relating to Brazil or its people

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Brazilian

Bra·zil·ian 7 [Brazilian Brazilians] adjective, noun   [brəˈzɪliən]    [brəˈzɪliən]

adjective

from or connected with Brazil

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

Brazilian

[brəzɪ̱liən]
 
 Brazilians
 ADJ

 Brazilian means belonging or relating to Brazil, or to its people or culture.
 N-COUNT
 A Brazilian is a person who comes from Brazil.

front

front [adjective]

In or at the front of something

US /frʌnt/ 
UK /frʌnt/ 

جلویی

مثال: 

One of his front teeth is missing.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

>> front adjective:
the front door
the front seat of a car

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

II. front2 S1 W2 BrE AmE adjective [only before noun]
1. at, on, or in the front of something OPP back:
Two of his front teeth had been knocked out.
the front cover of ‘Hello!’ magazine
the front wheel of his bicycle
the dog’s front legs
front door/garden/porch etc (=at the front of a house)
We walked up the front steps and into the reception area.
front seat/row
We got there an hour early in order to get seats in the front row.
2. a front organization is a legal one that is run in order to hide a secret or illegal activity:
a front organization for importing heroin ⇨ ↑front man(1)
3. technical a front vowel sound is made by raising your tongue at the front of your mouth, such as the vowel sound in ‘see’ ⇨ back

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

adjective only before noun
1. on or at the front of sth
front teeth
the front wheels of the car
We had seats in the front row.
an animal's front legs
Let's go through to the front room (= the main room in a house where people sit and entertain guests).
• a front-seat passenger

compare  back, hind  adj.

2. (phonetics) (of a vowel) produced with the front of the tongue in a higher position than the back, for example /[iː] / in English
compare  back, central  
Word Origin:

Middle English (denoting the forehead): from Old French front (noun), fronter (verb), from Latin frons, front- ‘forehead, front’.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

front / frʌnt / adjective [ before noun ]

B1 in or at the front of something:

One of his front teeth is missing.

I'd like seats on the front row of the stalls.

a dog's front paws

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

front

/frʌnt/
(fronts, fronting, fronted)

Frequency: The word is one of the 700 most common words in English.

1.
The front of something is the part of it that faces you, or that faces forward, or that you normally see or use.
One man sat in an armchair, and the other sat on the front of the desk...
Stand at the front of the line...
Her cotton dress had ripped down the front.
back
N-COUNT: usu sing, oft the N of n

2.
The front of a building is the side or part of it that faces the street.
Attached to the front of the house, there was a large veranda.
N-COUNT: usu sing, oft the N of n

3.
A person’s or animal’s front is the part of their body between their head and their legs that is on the opposite side to their back.
If you lie your baby on his front, he’ll lift his head and chest up.
back
N-SING: poss N

4.
Front is used to refer to the side or part of something that is towards the front or nearest to the front.
I went out there on the front porch...
She was only six and still missing her front teeth...
Children may be tempted to climb into the front seat while the car is in motion.
back
ADJ: ADJ n

5.
The front page of a newspaper is the outside of the first page, where the main news stories are printed.
The Guardian’s front page carries a photograph of the two foreign ministers...
The violence in the Gaza Strip makes the front page of most of the newspapers.
ADJ: ADJ n
see also front-page

6.
The front is a road next to the sea in a seaside town. (BRIT)
Amy went out for a last walk along the sea front.
= promenade
N-SING: the N

7.
In a war, the front is a line where two opposing armies are facing each other.
Sonja’s husband is fighting at the front.
N-COUNT: usu the N in sing
see also front line

8.
If you say that something is happening on a particular front, you mean that it is happening with regard to a particular situation or field of activity.
We’re moving forward on a variety of fronts.
N-COUNT

9.
If someone puts on a particular kind of front, they pretend to have a particular quality.
Michael kept up a brave front both to the world and in his home...
N-COUNT: usu adj N

10.
An organization or activity that is a front for one that is illegal or secret is used to hide it.
...a firm later identified by the police as a front for crime syndicates...
= cover
N-COUNT: usu N for n

11.
In relation to the weather, a front is a line where a mass of cold air meets a mass of warm air.
A very active cold front brought dramatic weather changes to Kansas on Wednesday.
N-COUNT

12.
A building or an area of land that fronts a particular place or fronts onto it is next to it and faces it.
...real estate, which includes undeveloped land fronting the city convention center...
There are some delightful Victorian houses fronting onto the pavement.
...quaint cottages fronted by lawns and flowerbeds.
= face
VERB: V n, V onto n, V-ed

13.
The person who fronts an organization is the most senior person in it. (BRIT; in AM, use head)
He fronted a formidable band of fighters...
The commission, fronted by Sir Isaac Hayatali, was set up in June 1992.
= head
VERB: V n, V-ed

14.
If a person or thing is in front, they are ahead of others in a moving group, or further forward than someone or something else.
Officers will crack down on lunatic motorists who speed or drive too close to the car in front...
‘What’s with this guy?’ demanded an American voice in the row in front.
PHRASE

15.
Someone who is in front in a competition or contest at a particular point is winning at that point.
Richard Dunwoody is in front in the jockeys’ title race...
Some preliminary polls show him out in front.
= leading
PHRASE: PHR after v, v-link PHR

16.
If someone or something is in front of a particular thing, they are facing it, ahead of it, or close to the front part of it.
She sat down in front of her dressing-table mirror to look at herself...
Something darted out in front of my car, and my car hit it...
A police car was parked in front of the house.
PREP-PHRASE

17.
If you do or say something in front of someone else, you do or say it when they are present.
They never argued in front of their children...
He has been brought up not to swear in front of women.
PREP-PHRASE

18.
On the home front or on the domestic front means with regard to your own country rather than foreign countries. (JOURNALISM)
Its present economic ills on the home front are largely the result of overspending...
On the domestic front, the president got his way with his budget proposals.
PHRASE: PHR with cl

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

2front adj always used before a noun
1 : of or relating to the front : located at the front
• There's a small statue on the front lawn.
• He keeps his wallet in his front pocket.
• the front entrance/hall
• She likes to sit in the front [=first] row. = She likes front-row seats.
• the front door [=the door in the front of a building that is usually the main entrance]
• The story appeared on the front page [=the first page] of the newspaper.
• We checked into the hotel at the front desk. [=the desk in a building where visitors are greeted]
• There is a dent in the car's front end. [=the part of a vehicle that faces forward]
2 golf
- used to refer to the first 9 holes of an 18-hole golf course
• He was two over par on the front nine.
front and center US : in the most important position or area
• These issues are front and center in voters' minds.

next

next [adjective]

Being the first one after the present one or after the one just mentioned

US /nekst/ 
UK /nekst/ 

بعدی

مثال: 

Take the next turning on the right.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

 adjective

1 coming after this one:
I'm going on holiday next week.
Take the next road on the right.

2 nearest to this one:
I live in the next village.

next to somebody or something at the side of somebody or something same meaning beside:
The bank is next to the post office.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

next

I. next1 S1 W1 /nekst/ BrE AmE determiner, adjective
1. the next event, day, time etc is the one that happens after the present one, or the previous one:
I just missed my flight to Chicago. When’s the next one?
We’ll look at the proposals at the next meeting.
Over the next couple of months, try to relax more and get more exercise.
next week/year/Monday etc
We’re hoping to open the factory some time next year.
the next day/week etc (=on or during the following day, week etc)
She called me and we arranged to meet the next day.
(the) next time
Next time I go skiing, I’ll wear warmer clothes.
2. the next house, room, place etc is the one that is nearest to where you are now:
Turn left at the next corner.
We could hear them arguing in the next room. ⇨ ↑next to
3. the next person or thing in a list, series etc comes after the one that you are dealing with now:
Read the next two chapters before Friday.
Do they have the next size up (=a slightly bigger size)?
4. next biggest/most common etc almost as big, more common etc than the one you are talking about:
Cancer-related diseases are the next biggest killers.
5. the next best thing the thing or situation that is almost as good as the one you really want:
If I can’t be home for Christmas, phoning you on the day is the next best thing.
6. the next thing I/she etc knew informal used when something surprising happens very suddenly:
The next thing I knew, I was lying face down on the pavement.
7. as the next man/person as any other man or person:
I am as keen to do well as the next man.
• • •
THESAURUS
next happening or coming immediately after another one: When does the next train to London leave? | I’ll see you next Saturday.
following happening or coming immediately after something – used about periods of time, or parts of a piece of writing: We met the following day. | The following weeks passed quickly. | the following pages of the book
subsequent formal happening or coming at some time after something else: the subsequent success of the film | This will be explained in more detail in subsequent chapters. | This figure is expected to rise steeply in subsequent years.
succeeding coming after someone or something else – used about a series of groups of people, periods of time, or parts of a book: succeeding generations | Succeeding governments have made the same mistake. | During the succeeding weeks he wrote several more letters.
coming happening soon: The information will be mailed to members during the coming weeks. | The villagers are storing up wood for the coming winter.
II. next2 S1 W1 BrE AmE adverb
1. immediately afterwards:
With John here, you never know what will happen next.
Next, put it in the oven for 20 minutes.
2. the next time:
When I next saw her she completely ignored me.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

next

next adjective, adverb, noun   [nekst]   [nekst] 

adjective only before noun
1. (usually with the) coming straight after sb/sth in time, order or space
The next train to Baltimore is at ten.
The next six months will be the hardest.
the next chapter
Who's next?
the woman in the next room
I fainted and the next thing I knew I was in the hospital.

(informal) Round here, you leave school at sixteen and next thing you know, you're married with three kids.

2. (used without the) ~ Monday, week, summer, year, etc. the Monday, week, etc. immediately following
Next Thursday is 12 April.
Next time I'll bring a book.
more at from one day to the next at  day, better luck next time at  luck  n.  
Word Origin:
Old English nēhsta ‘nearest’, superlative of nēah ‘nigh’; compare with Dutch naast and German nächste.  
Thesaurus:
next adj. only before noun
The next train to Baltimore will be at 12.20.
the followingcomingfuturelater|especially AmE upcoming|formal subsequentforthcomingprospective
Opp: last, Opp: past
the next/following month/decade/generation
the next event /future/later/upcoming/subsequent/forthcoming events
sb's next/future/later/upcoming/subsequent/forthcoming book/marriage  
Which Word?:
next / nearest
(The) next means ‘after this/that one’ in time or in a series of events, places or people: When is your next appointment? Turn left at the next traffic lights. Who’s next? (The) nearest means ‘closest’ in space: Where’s the nearest supermarket?
Notice the difference between the prepositions nearest to and next to: Janet’s sitting nearest to the window (= of all the people in the room) . Sarah’s sitting next to the window (= right beside it). In informal BrE nearest can be used instead of nearest to: Who’s sitting nearest the door?  
Example Bank:
I'm going away next month.
Next time I'll bring a book.
Round here, you leave school at sixteen and next thing you know, you're married with three kids.
The next chapter deals with the post-war situation.
The woman in the next room was talking in a very loud voice.
• Who's next?

Idiom: next man/woman/person

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

next / nekst / adjective , pronoun

A1 being the first one after the present one or after the one just mentioned:

Who works in the office next to yours?

Take the next turning on the right.

Who do you think will be the next president?

Nothing really changes around here. One day is pretty much like the next.

(The) next time you want to borrow something, please ask me first.

I'm so busy it's hard to remember what I'm supposed to be doing from one moment to the next.

She's on holiday for the next few days.

You'll have to wait until your next birthday for a new bike.

Can we arrange a meeting for the week after next?

What do you think you'll be doing this time next year?

We had a dreadful argument, but he phoned me the next day (= the day after) to apologize.

Excuse me, it's my turn to be served - I was next.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

next

/nekst/

Frequency: The word is one of the 700 most common words in English.

1.
The next period of time, event, person, or thing is the one that comes immediately after the present one or after the previous one.
I got up early the next morning.
...the next available flight...
Who will be the next prime minister?...
I want my next child born at home...
Many senior citizens have very few visitors from one week to the next...
ORD

2.
You use next in expressions such as next Friday, next day and next year to refer, for example, to the first Friday, day, or year that comes after the present or previous one.
Let’s plan a big night next week...
He retires next January...
Next day the EU summit strengthened their ultimatum.
DET

Next is also an adjective.
I shall be 26 years old on Friday next.
ADJ: n ADJ

Next is also a pronoun.
He predicted that the region’s economy would grow by about six per cent both this year and next.
PRON

3.
The next place or person is the one that is nearest to you or that is the first one that you come to.
Grace sighed so heavily that Trish could hear it in the next room...
The man in the next chair was asleep...
Stop at the next corner. I’m getting out.
ADJ: det ADJ

4.
The thing that happens next is the thing that happens immediately after something else.
Next, close your eyes then screw them up tight...
I don’t know what to do next...
The news is next.
ADV: ADV with cl, ADV after v, be ADV

5.
When you next do something, you do it for the first time since you last did it.
I next saw him at his house in Berkshire...
When we next met, he was much more jovial.
ADV: ADV before v

6.
You use next to say that something has more of a particular quality than all other things except one. For example, the thing that is next best is the one that is the best except for one other thing.
The one thing he didn’t have was a son. I think he’s felt that a grandson is the next best thing...
At least three times more daffodils are grown than in Holland, the next largest grower.
= second
ADV: ADV adj-superl

7.
You use after next in expressions such as the week after next to refer to a period of time after the next one. For example, when it is May, the month after next is July.
...the party’s annual conference, to be held in Bournemouth the week after next.
PHRASE: n PHR

8.
If you say that you do something or experience something as much as the next person, you mean that you are no different from anyone else in the respect mentioned.
I’m as ambitious as the next man. I’d like to manage at the very highest level.
PHRASE: as group PHR [emphasis]

9.
If one thing is next to another thing, it is at the other side of it.
She sat down next to him on the sofa.
...at the southern end of the Gaza Strip next to the Egyptian border...
The car was parked in the small weedy lot next to the hotel.
= beside
PREP-PHRASE

10.
You use next to in order to give the most important aspect of something when comparing it with another aspect.
Her children were the number two priority in her life next to her career...
= after
PREP-PHRASE

11.
You use next to before a negative, or a word that suggests something negative, to mean almost, but not completely.
Johnson still knew next to nothing about tobacco...
Most pre-prepared weight loss products are next to useless.
= virtually
PHRASE: PHR after v, v-link PHR, PHR nothing/adj

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1next /ˈnɛkst/ adj
1 : coming after this one : coming after the one that just came, happened, etc.
• the next day [=the day that comes after this day]
• Please turn to the next [=following] page.
• I'll see you next Monday.
• Are you coming this Thursday or next Thursday? [=are you coming on Thursday of this week or Thursday of next week?]
Next year's party will be even better.
• For the next two years [=two years after this point], she did nothing but eat, sleep, and study.
• the very next thing that happened
• Can I help the next person in line? Who's next?
• We could hear people talking in the next room.
• At the next set of lights, turn left.
Next stop, Los Angeles.
• I need the next size up.
• The next time we will see each other will be on our wedding day.
Next time, please remember to bring your books to class.
in the next life [=in the afterlife; in the life that we may have after death]
• I slipped, and the next thing I knew [=right after that happened], I was lying face up on the ground.
2 : any other
• He said he's as willing to do it as the next man. [=he's as willing as anyone else would be]
• She knew the answer as well as the next person.
next to : almost but not quite
• It's next to [=nearly, practically] impossible to drive in this snow.
• You ate next to nothing at dinner. Aren't you hungry?
• We were next to last in line. [=there was one person or group behind us]
• He finished next to last in the race.
• the next to last day of our vacation [=the day immediately before the last day of our vacation]

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