noun

pride

pride [noun] (SATISFACTION)

A feeling of pleasure and satisfaction that you get because you or people connected with you have done or got something good

US /praɪd/ 
UK /praɪd/ 

سربلندی ، افتخار

مثال: 

She felt a great sense of pride as she watched him accept the award.

آهنگ وترانه: 
You Are The Reason - Chris De Burgh

Oxford Essential Dictionary

pride

 noun (no plural)

1 the feeling that you are proud of something that you or others have got or have done:
She showed us her painting with great pride.

2 the feeling that you are better than other people

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

pride

I. pride1 S3 W3 /praɪd/ BrE AmE noun
[Language: Old English; Origin: pryde, from prud 'proud']
1. FEELING OF PLEASURE [uncountable] a feeling that you are proud of something that you or someone connected with you has achieved ⇨ proud:
He wore his medals with pride.
pride in
He takes great pride in his children’s achievements.
The people have a sense of pride in their community.
His heart swelled with pride when his daughter came in.
She felt a glow of pride when her name was announced for the prize.
Success in sport is a source of national pride.
2. RESPECT [uncountable] a feeling that you like and respect yourself and that you deserve to be respected by other people ⇨ proud
sb’s pride
It hurt his pride when his wife left him.
I think that getting a job would give him his pride back.
She didn’t try to hide her anger and injured pride.
It’s a matter of pride for some men that their wives don’t have to work.
3. TOO MUCH PRIDE [uncountable] a belief that you are better than other people and do not need their help or support ⇨ proud
sb’s pride
His pride wouldn’t allow him to ask for help.
She ought to swallow her pride (=ignore or forget her feelings of pride) and call him.
4. take pride in your work/appearance etc to do something very carefully and well, in a way that gives you a lot of satisfaction:
Your should take more pride in your work.
She took great pride in her appearance.
5. sb’s pride and joy a person or thing that someone is very proud of:
His garden is his pride and joy.
6. the pride of something
a) the thing or person that the people in a particular place are most proud of:
Wigan’s rugby team was the pride of the town.
b) the best thing in a group:
a beautiful Japanese sword that is the pride of our collection
7. have/take pride of place if something has or takes pride of place, it is put in the best place for people to see because it is the thing you are most proud of:
A large photograph of the children had pride of place on the sitting room wall.
8. LIONS [countable] a group of lions:
A young lion had strayed some distance from the pride.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ adjectives
great pride Caroline is pictured here holding the trophy with great pride.
immense pride (=very great) He takes immense pride in his grandson.
national pride (=pride in your country) A flag is a symbol of national pride.
civic pride (=pride in your town or city) The museum is a vital source of civic pride.
■ verbs
take pride in something (=feel proud of something) She takes pride in her beautiful gardens.
be bursting with pride (=feel very proud) I could see that her mother was bursting with pride.
swell with pride (=start to feel very proud) He would swell with pride as he discussed his department’s achievements.
glow with pride (=look very proud) ‘I knew he could do it,’ she said, glowing with pride.
■ phrases
a sense of pride I still feel a sense of pride at having been a member of the regiment.
a source of pride (=a reason to feel proud) The Chinese Olympic Games were a source of pride to the whole country.
• • •
THESAURUS
satisfaction a feeling of happiness or pleasure, especially because you have achieved something good or useful: Most teachers take great pride and satisfaction in their work.
pride a feeling of pleasure and satisfaction that you get when you or someone connected with you has achieved something good: Her father’s pride in her accomplishments was clear. | I was blushing with pride because I had been chosen to be on the team.
contentment the feeling of being happy and satisfied because you have what you want or need. Contentment is rather a formal use: Only when you truly know yourself can you find contentment. | He sat back with a look of deep contentment on his face.
fulfilment British English, fulfillment American English a feeling of being satisfied and happy with your life. Fulfilment is rather a formal use: Some women find fulfillment in being a mother, but this is not true for all women.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

pride

pride [pride prides prided priding] noun, verb   [praɪd]    [praɪd]

noun  

PLEASURE/SATISFACTION
1. uncountable, singular a feeling of pleasure or satisfaction that you get when you or people who are connected with you have done sth well or own sth that other people admire
The sight of her son graduating filled her with pride.
He felt a glow of pride as people stopped to admire his garden.
~ (in sth) I take (a) pride in my work.
~ (in doing sth) We take great pride in offering the best service in town.
I looked with pride at what I had achieved.

• Success in sport is a source of national pride.

2. singular the ~ of sth a person or thing that gives people a feeling of pleasure or satisfaction

• The new sports stadium is the pride of the town.  

RESPECT FOR YOURSELF

3. uncountable the feeling of respect that you have for yourself
Pride would not allow him to accept the money.
Her pride was hurt.
Losing his job was a real blow to his pride.

• It's time to swallow your pride (= hide your feelings of pride) and ask for your job back.

4. uncountable (disapproving) the feeling that you are better or more important than other people
• Male pride forced him to suffer in silence.

see also  proud  

LIONS

5. countable + singular or plural verb a group of lions 
Word Origin:
late Old English prȳde ‘excessive self-esteem’, variant of prȳtu, prȳte, from prūd ‘having a high opinion of one's own worth’, from Old French prud ‘valiant’, based on Latin prodesse ‘be of value’.  
Thesaurus:
pride noun
1. U, sing.
We take great pride in our nation's success in sport.
satisfactionhappinesscontentment|BrE fulfilment|AmE fulfillment
Opp: shame
pride/satisfaction/happiness/contentment/fulfilment in sth
bring sb pride/satisfaction/happiness/contentment/fulfilment
take pride/satisfaction in sth
2. U
I'm sorry if I hurt your pride.
dignityself-esteemself-respectfeelings|sometimes disapproving ego
injured/personal pride/dignity/self-esteem/feelings
hurt sb's pride/feelings
restore sb's pride/dignity/self-esteem/self-respect
3. U (disapproving)
Male pride forced him to suffer in silence.
egoismvanityarrogance|especially written conceit|literary hubris
Opp: humility, Opp: modesty
appeal to sb's pride/vanity 
Synonyms:
satisfaction
happiness pride contentment fulfilment
These are all words for the good feeling that you have when you are happy or when you have achieved sth.
satisfactionthe good feeling that you have when you have achieved sth or when sth that you wanted to happen does happen: He derived great satisfaction from knowing that his son was happy.
happinessthe good feeling that you have when you are happy: Money can't buy you happiness.
pridea feeling of pleasure or satisfaction that you get when you or people who are connected with you have done sth well or own sth that other people admire: The sight of her son graduating filled her with pride.
contentment(rather formal) a feeling of happiness or satisfaction with what you have: They found contentment in living a simple life.
fulfilmenta feeling of happiness or satisfaction with what you do or have done: her search for personal fulfilment
satisfaction, happiness, contentment or fulfilment?
You can feel satisfaction at achieving almost anything, small or large; you feel fulfilment when you do sth useful and enjoyable with your life. Happiness is the feeling you have when things give you pleasure and can be quite a lively feeling; contentment is a quieter feeling that you get when you have learned to find pleasure in things.
satisfaction/happiness/pride/contentment/fulfilment in sth
real satisfaction/happiness/pride/contentment/fulfilment
true satisfaction/happiness/contentment/fulfilment
great satisfaction/happiness/pride
quiet satisfaction/pride/contentment
to feel satisfaction/happiness/pride/contentment
to bring sb satisfaction/happiness/pride/contentment/fulfilment
to find satisfaction/happiness/contentment/fulfilment 
Example Bank:
Businesses rushed to include images of patriotic pride in their marketing.
He smiled with fatherly pride.
He swelled with pride as he held the trophy.
He was nursing his hurt pride.
His masculine pride would not let him admit that a girl had defeated him.
I didn't mean to hurt your pride.
I don't want your money— I have my pride, you know!
I wear my policeman's uniform with pride.
It is a matter of pride for him that he has never accepted money from his family.
It was foolish pride that prevented me from believing her.
It would be stupid to refuse through pride.
She expressed pride in her child's achievement.
She refused his offer tactfully, allowing him to go away with his pride intact.
She refused their help out of pride.
She swallowed her pride and called him.
She takes great pride in her work.
She took justifiable pride in her son's achievements.
Their reputation for fairness is a matter for pride.
They have a fierce pride in their traditions.
They have a strong sense of pride in their work.
They managed to salvage some pride with a late goal.
We want to restore pride in our public services.
the politics of racial pride and Black Power
He loves that boat, it's his pride and joy.
His pride would not allow him to admit she was right.
I take (a) pride in my work.
I'm sorry if I hurt your pride.
It's time to swallow your pride and ask for help.
She was conceited, haughty and full of pride and arrogance.
What's wrong— did I hurt your macho pride?
You're going to have to swallow your pride and ask for your job back.
Idioms: pride goes before a fall  pride of place  somebody's pride and joy

Derived: pride yourself on on doing something 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

pride / praɪd / noun (SATISFACTION)

B2 [ U ] a feeling of pleasure and satisfaction that you get because you or people connected with you have done or got something good:

She felt a great sense of pride as she watched him accept the award.

He felt such pride walking his little daughter down the street.

→  See also proud adjective (SATISFIED)

take pride in sth/sb to feel very pleased about something or someone you are closely connected with:

If you don't take professional pride in your work, you're probably in the wrong job.
 

pride / praɪd / noun [ U ] (RESPECT FOR YOURSELF)

B2 your feelings of your own worth and respect for yourself:

She has too much pride to accept any help.

The country's national pride has been damaged by its sporting failures.

 

pride / praɪd / noun [ U ] disapproving (FEELING OF IMPORTANCE)

the belief that you are better or more important than other people:

Pride was his downfall.

→  See also proud adjective (FEELING IMPORTANT)

 

pride / praɪd / noun [ C ] (LIONS)

a group of lions

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

pride

/praɪd/
(prides, priding, prided)

Frequency: The word is one of the 3000 most common words in English.

1.
Pride is a feeling of satisfaction which you have because you or people close to you have done something good or possess something good.
...the sense of pride in a job well done...
We take pride in offering you the highest standards...
They can look back on their endeavours with pride.
N-UNCOUNT: oft N in n/-ing

2.
Pride is a sense of the respect that other people have for you, and that you have for yourself.
It was a severe blow to Kendall’s pride.
= self-esteem
N-UNCOUNT

3.
Someone’s pride is the feeling that they have that they are better or more important than other people.
His pride may still be his downfall.
= arrogance
N-UNCOUNT [disapproval]

4.
If you pride yourself on a quality or skill that you have, you are very proud of it.
Smith prides himself on being able to organise his own life...
VERB: V pron-refl on -ing/n

5.
Someone or something that is your pride and joy is very important to you and makes you feel very happy.
The bike soon became his pride and joy.
PHRASE: v-link PHR

6.
If something takes pride of place, it is treated as the most important thing in a group of things.
A three-foot-high silver World Championship cup takes pride of place near a carved wooden chair...
PHRASE: PHR after v

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1pride /ˈpraɪd/ noun, pl prides
1 [noncount]
a : a feeling that you respect yourself and deserve to be respected by other people : self-respect
• Being able to work again gave him his pride back.
• Getting caught cheating stripped him of his pride.
Pride would not allow her to give up.
• It's a matter of pride that he does the work all by himself.
b : a feeling that you are more important or better than other people
• The novel is about a family consumed with pride and vanity.
• They needed help, but their pride wouldn't let them ask for it.
• I had to swallow my pride and admit I made a mistake.
2 a : a feeling of happiness that you get when you or someone you know does something good, difficult, etc.

[noncount]

• The sight of her son holding the trophy filled her with pride. [=made her very proud]
• She spoke with pride [=she spoke proudly] about her son's achievements.
• She looked at her painting with pride. [=satisfaction]
• He takes pride in [=is proud of] his work.

[singular]

• He showed a great/immense pride in his family.
b [singular] : a person or thing that makes you feel proud
• These young people are the pride of their community.
3 [count] : a group of lions
pride and joy : someone or something that makes you very proud and happy
• Our children are our pride and joy.
• The car is his pride and joy.
pride of place : the highest position or best place
• The Nobel Prize winner was given pride of place at the conference.
• The statue has pride of place in the center of town.
• A picture of their children took pride of place on the wall.
- pride·ful /ˈpraɪdfəl/ adj [more ~; most ~] US
• a prideful [=proud] parent
• He was too prideful to accept their help.
- pride·ful·ly adv US

video

video [noun] (FILM)

A recording of moving pictures and sound, especially as a digital file, DVD, etc

US /ˈvɪd.i.oʊ/ 
UK /ˈvɪd.i.əʊ/ 

ویدئو، فیلم

مثال: 

I'd ​far ​rather go to the ​theatre than ​watch a video.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

video

 noun (plural videos)

1 (also videotape) tape in a plastic box (called a cassette) on which a film, TV programme or real event is recorded:
You can get this film on video or on DVD.
We stayed at home and watched a video.
They made a video of the wedding.

2 (British) (also video recorder) a machine connected to a television, that you use for recording or showing programmes:
Have you set the video?

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

video

I. video1 S1 W2 /ˈvɪdiəʊ $ -dioʊ/ BrE AmE noun (plural videos)
1. [uncountable and countable] a copy of a film or television programme, or a series of events, recorded on ↑videotape
hire a video British English rent a video American English:
How much does it cost to hire videos?
Let’s stay at home and watch a video.
Rewind the video right to the beginning.
The school will be making a video of the play.
on video
The movie has not yet been released on video.
coming soon to a video store near you
2. [countable] a plastic box containing special tape for recording programmes and films on television SYN videotape, video cassette:
Have we got a blank video (=one with nothing recorded on it yet) anywhere?
3. [countable] British English a machine used to record television programmes or show videos SYN VCR, video cassette recorder
programme/set the video
Can you set the video to record the football match?
4. [uncountable] the process of recording or showing television programmes, films, real events etc on ↑videotape:
The course aims to help children learn through video.
5. [countable] a short film that is made to go with a particular piece of popular music SYN music video
6. [countable] a ↑digital recording of an event, for example one made using a ↑mobile phone:
a video clip shown on the Internet
• • •
COLLOCATIONS (for Meaning 4)
■ video + NOUN
video footage Police are currently studying video footage to identify the rioters.
a video recording Can a video recording of an interview with a child be used in a court as evidence?
a video image (=a moving picture on a video) Video images of the surgery are sent to a special lecture theatre, so that students can observe.
a video clip (=a short video) You can download video clips from the Internet.
video evidence (=a recording of events, used in a court) Video evidence of illegal activities can later be used in court.
■ verbs
record something on video She had no idea that her purchase was being recorded on video.
be captured/caught on video (=recorded on video) The crime was captured on video.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

video

video [video videos] noun, verb   [ˈvɪdiəʊ]    [ˈvɪdioʊ]

noun (pl. videos)
1. (also video·tape) uncountable, countable a type of magnetic tape used for recording moving pictures and sound; a box containing this tape, also called a video cassette
The movie will be released on video in June.

• Do we have a blank video?

2. uncountable a system of recording moving pictures and sound, either using videotape or a digital method of storing data
• A wedding is the perfect subject for video.

• the use of video in schools

3. countable a copy of a film/movie, programme, etc. that is recorded on videotape
a video of ‘ET’
a home video (= not a professional one)

• a video shop/store

 

4. (also ˈmusic video) countable a short film made by a pop or rock band to be shown with a song when it is played on television

5. (also ˈvideo clip) countable a short film or recording of an event, made using digital technology and viewed on a computer, especially over the Internet
The school made a short promotional video.

• Upload your videos and share them with friends and family online.

6. countable (BrE) =  video cassette recorder
to programme the video to record the football match  
Word Origin:
1930s: from Latin videre ‘to see’, on the pattern of audio.  
Collocations:
Cinema/the movies
Watching
go to/take sb to (see) a film/movie
go to/sit in (BrE) the cinema/(NAmE) the (movie) theater
rent a film/movie/DVD
download a film/movie/video
burn/copy/rip a DVD
see/watch a film/movie/DVD/video/preview/trailer
Showing
show/screen a film/movie
promote/distribute/review a film/movie
(BrE) be on at the cinema
be released on/come out on/be out on DVD
captivate/delight/grip/thrill the audience
do well/badly at the box office
get a lot of/live up to the hype
Film-making
write/co-write a film/movie/script/screenplay
direct/produce/make/shoot/edit a film/movie/sequel/video
make a romantic comedy/a thriller/an action movie
do/work on a sequel/remake
film/shoot the opening scene/an action sequence/footage (of sth)
compose/create/do/write the soundtrack
cut/edit (out) a scene/sequence
Acting
have/get/do an audition
get/have/play a leading/starring/supporting role
play a character/James Bond/the bad guy
act in/appear in/star in a film/movie/remake
do/perform/attempt a stunt
work in/make it big in Hollywood
forge/carve/make/pursue a career in Hollywood
Describing films
the camera pulls back/pans over sth/zooms in (on sth)
the camera focuses on sth/lingers on sth
shoot sb/show sb in extreme close-up
use odd/unusual camera angles
be filmed/shot on location/in a studio
be set/take place in London/in the '60s
have a happy ending/plot twist 
Example Bank:
An amateur video of the crash failed to reveal the cause.
Did you remember to set the video for ‘EastEnders’?
He posted a video on his website
I can't find the video channel on this television.
She started making a video diary of her life.
The band are in Iceland doing a video shoot.
The children can sit for hours watching videos.
The film is already out on video.
The group's new video will be released next month.
The infamous video nasty is now a cult film.
The jury watched video footage of the riots.
The speech was broadcast via a video link to thousands standing outside.
The thief was caught on video as he pocketed watches and rings.
Their teacher showed them a video about the Inuit.
They produce educational videos for learning languages.
They sell both blank and pre-recorded videos.
This article and the accompanying video takes you through each stage step by step.
Video files can be readily transmitted over digital broadband.
We rent videos nearly every weekend.
You need a broadband Internet connection to stream video online.
a review of the latest video releases
a security video of the attack
• The school made a short promotional video.

• You can view and share video clips on this website.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

video / ˈvɪd.i.əʊ /   / -oʊ / noun ( plural videos ) (FILM)

A2 [ U or C ] a recording of moving pictures and sound, especially as a digital file, DVD, etc.:

My new laptop handles video really well.

People can upload videos of their pets to this website.

We had a video made of our wedding.

"Avatar" is now available on video.

→  See also tape noun (RECORDING)

A2 [ C ] ( also music video ) a short film made to advertise a popular song

 

video / ˈvɪd.i.əʊ /   / -oʊ / noun [ C ] ( plural videos ) (MACHINE)

UK for videocassette recorder

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

video

/vɪdioʊ/
(videos, videoing, videoed)

Frequency: The word is one of the 1500 most common words in English.

1.
A video is a film or television programme recorded on tape for people to watch on a television set.
...the makers of films and videos.
N-COUNT

2.
Video is the system of recording films and events on tape so that people can watch them on a television set.
She has watched the race on video.
...manufacturers of audio and video equipment.
N-UNCOUNT: oft on N

3.
A video is a machine that you can use to record television programmes and play videotapes on a television set. (mainly BRIT; in AM, usually use VCR)
He’d set the video for 8.00.
= video recorder, VCR
N-COUNT

4.
If you video a television programme or event, you record it on tape using a video recorder or video camera, so that you can watch it later. (mainly BRIT; in AM, usually use tapevideotape)
She had been videoing the highlights of the tournament...
= videotape, tape
VERB: V n

5.
Video is a system by which you can see television images or films on your computer, rather than on a television set.
N-UNCOUNT

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1vid·eo /ˈvɪdijoʊ/ noun, pl -eos
1 [count] : a movie, television show, event, etc., that has been recorded onto a videocassette, DVD, etc., so that it can be watched on a television or computer screen
• We're going to rent a couple of videos to watch this weekend.
• She was talking about a popular video she saw on the Internet.
• The video of their wedding was made by a professional company.
• They showed us some of their home videos. [=recordings that they had made using a video camera]
2 [noncount]1videotape 1
• The movie is available on video and DVD.
3 [count] : a recorded performance of a song in which visual images are shown together with the music
• a TV channel that plays videos all day
• Her latest music video was first released on the Internet.
4 [noncount] : the moving images that are seen in a recording or broadcast
• The audio is OK but there's a problem with the video.

sin

sin [noun]

the offence of breaking, or the breaking of, a religious or moral law

US /sɪn/ 
UK /sɪn/ 

گناه‌، معصيت‌

مثال: 

to commit a sin

گناه‌ كردن‌

Oxford Essential Dictionary

sin

 noun
something that your religion says you should not do, because it is very bad:
Stealing is a sin.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

sin

I. sin1 S2 /sɪn/ BrE AmE noun
[Language: Old English; Origin: synn]
1. [uncountable and countable] an action that is against religious rules and is considered to be an offence against God
sin of
the sin of pride
She needed to confess her sins and ask for forgiveness.
He knew that he had committed a terrible sin.
the seven deadly sins (=seven bad feelings or desires, in the Christian religion)
2. a sin informal something that you think is very wrong
it is a sin (to do something)
There’s so much lovely food here, it would be a sin to waste it.
3. live in sin old-fashioned if two people live in sin, they live together in a sexual relationship without being married
4. as miserable/ugly/guilty as sin especially British English spoken very unhappy, ugly, or guilty:
I saw Margaret this morning looking as miserable as sin.
5. for my sins especially British English spoken an expression used to suggest jokingly that you have to do something as a punishment:
I work at head office now, for my sins.
sinful
cover/hide a multitude of sins at ↑multitude(4), ⇨ ↑cardinal sin, ↑mortal sin, ↑original sin

COLLOCATIONS
■ verbs
commit a sin He has committed a grave sin.
confess your sins He knelt and confessed his sins to God.
forgive sins God has forgiven all my sins.
repent (of) your sins (=be sorry you committed them) I sincerely repent of my sins.
■ phrases
the seven deadly sins (=seven bad feelings or desires, in the Christian religion, for example greed or too much pride)
■ adjectives
a great sin Possibly the greatest sin you can be guilty of is not speaking out against cruelty or injustice when you see it.
a besetting sin literary (=one that you keep committing) Drunkenness was his besetting sin.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

sin

 

sin [sin sins sinned sinning] noun, verb, abbreviation   [sɪn]    [sɪn] 

 

noun
1. countable an offence against God or against a religious or moral law
to commit a sin
Confess your sins to God and he will forgive you.
• The Bible says that stealing is a sin.

see also  mortal sin, original sin

2. uncountable the act of breaking a religious or moral law

• a life of sin

3. countable, usually singular (informal) an action that people strongly disapprove of
It's a sin to waste taxpayers' money like that.
see also  sinful, sinner 
more at cover/hide a multitude of sins at  multitude, live in sin at  live1  
Word Origin:
v. and n. Old English synn (noun), syngian (verb); probably related to Latin sons, sont- ‘guilty’.  
Collocations:
Religion
Being religious
believe in God/Christ/Allah/free will/predestination/heaven and hell/an afterlife/reincarnation
be/become a believer/an atheist/an agnostic/a Christian/Muslim/Hindu/Buddhist, etc.
convert to/practise/ (especially US) practice a religion/Buddhism/Catholicism/Christianity/Islam/Judaism, etc.
go to church/(NAmE) temple (= the synagogue)
go to the local church/mosque/synagogue/gurdwara
belong to a church/a religious community
join/enter the church/a convent/a monastery/a religious sect/the clergy/the priesthood
praise/worship/obey/serve/glorify God
Celebrations and ritual
attend/hold/conduct/lead a service
perform a ceremony/a rite/a ritual/a baptism/the Hajj/a mitzvah
carry out/perform a sacred/burial/funeral/fertility/purification rite
go on/make a pilgrimage
celebrate Christmas/Easter/Eid/Ramadan/Hanukkah/Passover/Diwali
observe/break the Sabbath/a fast/Ramadan
deliver/preach/hear a sermon
lead/address the congregation
say/recite a prayer/blessing
Religious texts and ideas
preach/proclaim/spread the word of God/the Gospel/the message of Islam
study/follow the dharma/the teachings of Buddha
read/study/understand/interpret scripture/the Bible/the Koran/the gospel/the Torah
be based on/derive from divine revelation
commit/consider sth heresy/sacrilege
Religious belief and experience
seek/find/gain enlightenment/wisdom
strengthen/lose your faith
keep/practise/practice/abandon the faith
save/purify/lose your soul
obey/follow/keep/break/violate a commandment/Islamic law/Jewish law
be/accept/do God's will
receive/experience divine grace
achieve/attain enlightenment/salvation/nirvana
undergo a conversion/rebirth/reincarnation
hear/answer a prayer
commit/confess/forgive a sin
do/perform penance 
Example Bank:
Even politicians are not immune from the sins of the flesh.
It's considered a sin to be disrespectful to your parents.
Our sons will pay for the sins of their fathers.
Sin against others is seen as a sin against God.
The besetting sin of 18th-century urban Britain was drunkenness.
They had confessed their sins and done their penance.
They would have to expiate their sins through suffering.
We believe in the forgiveness of sins.
We have repented for past sins. Now it's time to move on.
sin taxes on cigarettes and alcohol
the Christian doctrine of original sin
Believers are called on to turn away from sin and embrace a life of prayer.
Father, I have committed a sin.
He was pursuing an active life of sin when he felt the Lord speaking to him.
• It's a sin to waste taxpayers' money like that.

Idioms: something for your sins  ugly as sin 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

sin / sɪn / noun [ C or U ]

C2 the offence of breaking, or the breaking of, a religious or moral law:

to commit/confess a sin

He thinks a lot about sin.

[ + to infinitive ] informal I think it 's a sin (= is morally wrong) to waste food, when so many people in the world are hungry.

humorous For my sins (= as if it were a punishment) , I'm organizing the office party this year.

 

sinless / -ləs / adjective

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

sin

[sɪ̱n]
 sins, sinning, sinned
 1) N-VAR Sin or a sin is an action or type of behaviour which is believed to break the laws of God.
 → See also cardinal sin, mortal sin
  The Vatican's teaching on abortion is clear: it is a sin...
  Was it the sin of pride to have believed too much in themselves?
 2) VERB If you sin, you do something that is believed to break the laws of God.
  [V against n] The Spanish Inquisition charged him with sinning against God and man...
  You have sinned and unless you repent your ways you will surely roast in hell.
  Derived words:
  sinner [sɪ̱nə(r)] plural N-COUNT I was shown that I am a sinner, that I needed to repent of my sins.
 3) N-COUNT A sin is any action or behaviour that people disapprove of or consider morally wrong.
  ...the sin of arrogant hard-heartedness...
  The ultimate sin was not infidelity, but public mention which led to scandal.
 4) PHRASE: V inflects If you say that a man and a woman are living in sin, you mean that they are living together as a couple although they are not married. [OLD-FASHIONED]
 a multitude of sinssee multitude
  She was living in sin with her boyfriend.

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1sin /ˈsɪn/ noun, pl sins
1 : an action that is considered to be wrong according to religious or moral law

[count]

• He committed the sin of stealing.
• Murder is a sin.
• I confessed my sins.

[noncount]

• We are not free from sin.
• a world of sin
- see also cardinal sin, deadly sin, mortal sin, original sin, venial sin
2 [count] : an action that is considered to be bad - usually singular
• It's a sin to waste food.
- see also besetting sin
(as) guilty/miserable/ugly as sin informal : very guilty/miserable/ugly
• Even though he was acquitted, most people think he is guilty as sin.
• That house is as ugly as sin.
for your sins chiefly Brit humorous
- used to say that you are doing something unpleasant, difficult, etc., as a form of punishment
For my sins, I was made chairman of the board.
live in sin
- see 1live

politics

politics [noun]

The activities of the government, members of law-making organizations, or people who try to influence the way a country is governed

US /ˈpɑː.lə.tɪks/ 
UK /ˈpɒl.ə.tɪks/ 

سیاست

مثال: 

Joe is very active in left-wing politics.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

politics

 noun (no plural)

1 the work and ideas that are connected with government:
Are you interested in politics?

2 the study of government:
She studied Politics at university.
Look at the notes at Congress, election and party.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

politics

politics S2 W2 /ˈpɒlətɪks, ˈpɒlɪtɪks $ ˈpɑː-/ BrE AmE noun
[Word Family: noun: ↑politician, ↑politics, ↑politicization, ↑politicking, ↑politico; adjective: ↑political, ↑politicized, ↑apolitical, ↑politic; verb: ↑politicize; adverb: ↑politically]
[Date: 1500-1600; Language: Greek; Origin: politika (plural), from politikos; ⇨ ↑politic]
1. [U also + plural verb British English] ideas and activities relating to gaining and using power in a country, city etc ⇨ political, politician:
a good understanding of politics in China
modern American politics
Politics have always interested Anita.
national/local etc politics
Brooke’s been involved in city politics since college.
The president should stand above party politics (=working only for your political ↑party).
2. [uncountable] the profession of being a politician:
Flynn retired from politics in 1986.
Her father’s trying to enter politics.
Smith went into politics in his early twenties.
3. [plural] the activities of people who are concerned with gaining personal advantage within a group, organization etc:
I’m tired of dealing with all of the office politics.
Her art examines sexual politics (=how power is shared between men and women).
politics of
the politics of race and class at American universities
4. [plural] someone’s political beliefs and opinions:
I assume her politics must be fairly conservative.
5. [uncountable] especially British English the study of political power and systems of government SYN political science:
Tom is studying for a degree in politics.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + politics
national politics Mark had always been keen to have a career in national politics.
local politics Ann is very active in local politics.
international politics The two superpowers that dominated international politics.
world/global politics There was much going on in world politics at the time.
domestic politics (=within a country) The war had a major impact on the country’s domestic politics.
party politics (=trying to make your party successful) He believes that party politics has no place in local government.
power politics (=attempting to get power by using or threatening to use force) The party argued that power politics would always lead to war.
■ phrases
be involved in politics After university, he became involved in local politics.
take part in politics Young people should be encouraged to take part in politics.
be active in politics (=be involved in) I was very active in politics before I retired.
interfere/meddle in politics He warned the army against interfering in politics.
• • •
THESAURUS
right-wing adjective a right-wing person or group wants low taxes, a strong army and police force, and the individual to be free from government interference as much as possible: right-wing political parties | Some of his supporters are very right-wing. | right-wing policies on gun control
left-wing adjective a left-wing person or group wants the government to make society more equal by increasing taxes for rich people, and taking control of important industries and services: a left-wing newspaper | His views are very left-wing.
green adjective [usually before noun] supporting policies and principles which will protect the environment: green politicians | the Green Party | The government is under pressure to improve its green credentials (=to seem more like it wants to protect the environment).
radical adjective supporting political ideas that will involve great change: radical politicians | a radical economic reform programme
liberal adjective supporting political ideas that will allow people to have greater freedom: They want the government to have a more liberal policy on drugs.
moderate adjective having political opinions which are not extreme: People generally become more moderate as they get older. | The bill is supported by moderate Republicans.
extreme adjective having political opinions which are considered to be very unreasonable by many people: His views on immigration are very extreme. | an extreme right-wing organization

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

politics

pol·it·ics [politics]   [ˈpɒlətɪks]    [ˈpɑːlətɪks]  noun
1. uncountable + singular or plural verb the activities involved in getting and using power in public life, and being able to influence decisions that affect a country or a society
party politics
local politics
He's thinking of going into politics (= trying to become a Member of Parliament, Congress, etc.)

• a major figure in British politics

2. uncountable + singular or plural verb (disapproving) matters concerned with getting or using power within a particular group or organization
I don't want to get involved in office politics.
• the internal politics of the legal profession

• sexual politics (= concerning relationships of power between the sexes)

3. plural a person's political views or beliefs

• His politics are extreme.

4. uncountable =  political science

• a degree in Politics

5. singular a system of political beliefs; a state of political affairs
A politics of the future has to engage with new ideas.  
Collocations:
Politics
Power
create/form/be the leader of a political party
gain/take/win/lose/regain control of Congress
start/spark/lead/be on the brink of a revolution
be engaged/locked in an internal power struggle
lead/form a rival/breakaway faction
seize/take control of the government/power
bring down/overthrow/topple the government/president/regime
abolish/overthrow/restore the monarchy
establish/install a military dictatorship/a stable government
be forced/removed/driven from office/power
resign/step down as party leader/an MP/president/prime minister
enter/retire from/return to political life
Political debate
spark/provoke a heated/hot/intense/lively debate
engage in/participate in/contribute to (the) political/public debate (on/over sth)
get involved in/feel excluded from the political process
launch/start/lead/spearhead a campaign/movement
join/be linked with the peace/anti-war/feminist/civil rights movement
criticize/speak out against/challenge/support the government
lobby/put pressure on the government (to do sth)
come under fire/pressure from opposition parties
Policy
call for/demand/propose/push for/advocate democratic/political/land reform(s)
formulate/implement domestic economic policy
change/influence/shape/have an impact on government/economic/public policy
be consistent with/be in line with/go against/be opposed to government policy
reform/restructure/modernize the tax system
privatize/improve/deliver/make cuts in public services
invest (heavily) in/spend sth on schools/education/public services/(the) infrastructure
nationalize the banks/the oil industry
promise/propose/deliver/give ($80 billion in/significant/substantial/massive) tax cuts
a/the budget is approved/ (especially NAmE) passed by parliament/congress
Making laws
have a majority in/have seats in Parliament/Congress/the Senate
propose/sponsor a bill/legislation/a resolution
introduce/bring in/draw up/draft/adopt/pass a bill/a law/legislation/measures
amend/repeal an act/a law/legislation
veto/vote against/oppose a bill/legislation/a measure/a proposal/a resolution
get/require/be decided by a majority vote
more collocations at economy, voting  
Example Bank:
As a churchman, he was accused of interfering in politics.
Consensus politics places a high value on existing political institutions.
He abandoned politics and went into business.
He argued that it was not practical politics to abolish private schools.
He used dirty politics to trash his opponent's record.
His manners were as mild as his politics were extreme.
I don't understand the politics of it all.
I have always followed politics closely.
In their world politics dominates everything.
Let's not talk politics now.
My personal politics are pretty simple.
She was active in local politics for many years.
The Democrats are simply engaging in partisan politics.
The legislation has been driven by populist politics.
They took the view that Casper was playing power politics with their jobs at stake.
They went into politics in the hope of changing society.
multiculturalism and the rise of identity politics
reforms that are intended to reshape Italian politics
the country's internal politics
the issues which have dominated Irish politics
• the politics surrounding reproduction and fertility

• the role politics played in daily life

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

politics / ˈpɒl.ɪ.tɪks /   / ˈpɑː.lə- / noun

B1 [ U ] the activities of the government, members of law-making organizations, or people who try to influence the way a country is governed:

Joe is very active in left-wing politics.

[ U ] the job of holding a position of power in the government:

The group is campaigning to get more women into politics.

He is planning to retire from politics next year.

[ U ] the study of the ways in which a country is governed:

She read politics at Leicester University.

sb's politics someone's opinions about how a country should be governed:

Her politics have become more liberal over the past few years.

[ plural ] the relationships within a group or organization that allow particular people to have power over others:

I don't like to get involved in office politics.

Word partners for politics

enter / go into / be involved in politics • discuss / talk politics • local / national / regional politics

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

politics

/pɒlɪtɪks/

Frequency: The word is one of the 1500 most common words in English.

1.
Politics are the actions or activities concerned with achieving and using power in a country or society. The verb that follows politics may be either singular or plural.
The key question in British politics was how long the prime minister could survive...
The film takes no position on the politics of Northern Ireland...
Politics is by no means the only arena in which women are excelling.
N-PLURAL
see also party politics

2.
Your politics are your beliefs about how a country ought to be governed.
My politics are well to the left of centre.
N-PLURAL: usu with poss

3.
Politics is the study of the ways in which countries are governed.
He began studying politics and medieval history.
...young politics graduates.
N-UNCOUNT

4.
Politics can be used to talk about the ways that power is shared in an organization and the ways it is affected by personal relationships between people who work together. The verb that follows politics may be either singular or plural.
You need to understand how office politics influence the working environment.
N-PLURAL

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

politics

pol·i·tics /ˈpɑːləˌtɪks/ noun
1 [noncount] : activities that relate to influencing the actions and policies of a government or getting and keeping power in a government
• He is an important figure in American politics.
• The students discussed the latest news in national/local politics.
Politics has always interested her. = She's always been interested in politics.
- often used with a plural verb
Politics have always interested her.
• He talked about the ways in which global politics are changing.
• The mayor's politics [=the political decisions the mayor made] were often criticized during her time in office.
- see also party politics, power politics
2 [noncount] : the work or job of people (such as elected officials) who are part of a government
Politics is a competitive profession.
• She plans on going into politics. = She plans on entering politics. [=she plans on getting a job that involves politics]
3 [plural] : the opinions that someone has about what should be done by governments : a person's political thoughts and opinions
• She has changed her politics.
• His politics are very liberal/conservative. [=he believes that governments should be liberal/conservative]
4 [noncount] often disapproving : the activities, attitudes, or behaviors that are used to get or keep power or an advantage within a group, organization, etc.
• I don't want to get involved in office politics.
• She wrote a book about sexual politics [=the way men and women deal with and behave toward each other] in the academic world.
5 [noncount] chiefly Brit : political science
• a degree in politics
play politics disapproving : to say or do things for political reasons instead of doing what is right or what is best for other people
• She's been accused of playing politics with the investigation.
• Legislators need to stop playing politics with our future.

technology

technology [noun]

(the study and knowledge of) the practical, especially industrial, use of scientific discoveries

US /tekˈnɑː.lə.dʒi/ 
UK /tekˈnɒl.ə.dʒi/ 

تکنولوژی، فناوری

مثال: 

What this ​country ​needs is a ​long-term ​policy for ​investment in​ science and technology.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

technology

 noun (no plural)
knowing about science and about how things work, and using this to build and make things:
science and technology
developments in computer technology

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

technology

technology S2 W1 AC /tekˈnɒlədʒi $ -ˈnɑː-/ BrE AmE noun (plural technologies) [uncountable and countable]
[Word Family: noun: ↑technology, ↑technologist, ↑techie; adverb: ↑technologically; adjective: ↑technological]
new machines, equipment, and ways of doing things that are based on modern knowledge about science and computers:
Modern technology makes moving money around much easier than it used to be.
Advances in technology have improved crop yields by over 30%.
There have been major new developments in satellite technology.
Many people are unwilling to embrace new technologies.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + technology
new/modern technology People have no faith in new technology.
the latest technology The boat is equipped with the latest technology.
advanced technology The labs use advanced technology to study the function of various cells.
computer technology the rapid development of computer technology in the 1950s and 1960s
digital technology Digital technology is bringing the media and communications sectors together.
medical technology The advance of medical technology has meant that more patients survive.
military technology Military technology makes huge advances during wartime.
■ phrases
advances/developments in technology Because of developments in technology, minicomputers can now do what mainframes did in the past.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

technology

tech·nol·ogy AW [technology technologies]   [tekˈnɒlədʒi]    [tekˈnɑːlədʒi]  noun (pl. tech·nol·ogies)
1. uncountable, countable scientific knowledge used in practical ways in industry, for example in designing new machines
science and technology
recent advances in medical technology
• to make use of the most modern technologies

see also  high technology, information technology

2. uncountable machinery or equipment designed using technology
The company has invested in the latest technology.
Derived Words: technological  technologically  
Word Origin:
early 17th cent.: from Greek tekhnologia ‘systematic treatment’, from tekhnē ‘art, craft’ + -logia (see -logy).  
Example Bank:
Telecommunications technology is developing fast.
The company is investing heavily in new technologies.
The technology already exists to do this.
This technology enables computers to read handwriting.
We need to exploit existing technologies more fully.
We now have the technologies to transplant limbs.
a car based on alternative technology
a car engine based on technology developed for aeroplanes
exploiting existing technologies more fully
• small businesses that are involved with emerging technologies

• the technology for the extraction of iron ore

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

technology / tekˈnɒl.ə.dʒi /   / -ˈnɑː.lə- / noun [ C or U ]

B1 (the study and knowledge of) the practical, especially industrial, use of scientific discoveries:

computer technology

Modern technology is amazing, isn't it?

What this country needs is a long-term policy for investment in science and technology.

→  See also biotechnology

Word partners for technology

develop / harness technology • have the technology to do sth • advanced / cutting-edge / modern / new technology • the latest technology

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

technology

/teknɒlədʒi/
(technologies)

Frequency: The word is one of the 1500 most common words in English.

Technology refers to methods, systems, and devices which are the result of scientific knowledge being used for practical purposes.
Technology is changing fast...
They should be allowed to wait for cheaper technologies to be developed.

N-VAR

tech‧nolo‧gist (technologists)
...the scientists and technologists that we will need for the future.

N-COUNT

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

technology

tech·nol·o·gy /tɛkˈnɑːləʤi/ noun, pl -gies
1 [noncount] : the use of science in industry, engineering, etc., to invent useful things or to solve problems
• Recent advances in medical technology have saved countless lives.
• The company is on the cutting edge of technology.
2 : a machine, piece of equipment, method, etc., that is created by technology

[count]

• The government is developing innovative/advanced technologies to improve the safety of its soldiers.
• How can we apply this new technology to our everyday lives?

[noncount]

• The car has the latest in fuel-saving technology.
- tech·no·log·i·cal /ˌtɛknəˈlɑːʤɪkəl/ also US tech·no·log·ic /ˌtɛknəˈlɑːʤɪk/ adj
• Many technological advances/developments/changes in medicine have taken place over the past decade.
- tech·no·log·i·cal·ly /ˌtɛknəˈlɑːʤɪkli/ adv
• a technologically advanced society
technologically savvy consumers

language

language [noun]

A system of communication consisting of sounds, words, and grammar, or the system of communication used by people in a particular country or type of work

US /ˈlæŋ.ɡwɪdʒ/ 
UK /ˈlæŋ.ɡwɪdʒ/ 

زبان

مثال: 

She does research into how children acquire language.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

language

 noun

1 (plural languages) words that people from a particular country say and write:
'Do you speak any foreign languages?' 'Yes, I speak French and Italian.'

2 (no plural) words that people use to speak and write:
This word is not often used in spoken language.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

language

language S1 W1 /ˈlæŋɡwɪdʒ/ BrE AmE noun
[Date: 1200-1300; Language: Old French; Origin: langue 'tongue, language', from Latin lingua]
1. ENGLISH/FRENCH/ARABIC ETC [uncountable and countable] a system of communication by written or spoken words, which is used by the people of a particular country or area:
How many languages do you speak?
one of the best-known poems in the English language
2. COMMUNICATION [uncountable] the use of written or spoken words to communicate:
the origins of language
3. STYLE/TYPE OF WORDS [uncountable] a particular style or type of words
legal/medical/technical etc language
The letter was written in complicated legal language.
spoken/written language
The expression is mainly used in written language.
ordinary/everyday language
He is able to explain complicated ideas in simple everyday language.
literary/poetic language
The plays are full of old-fashioned poetic language.
language of
the language of science
4. SWEARING [uncountable] informal words that most people think are offensive
mind/watch your language spoken (=stop swearing)
bad/foul/abusive language
5. strong language
a) angry words used to tell people exactly what you mean
b) words that most people think are offensive SYN swearing
6. COMPUTERS [uncountable and countable] technical a system of instructions for operating a computer:
a programming language for the web
7. SIGNS/ACTIONS/SOUNDS [uncountable and countable] signs, movements, or sounds that express ideas or feelings
language of
the language of bees
the language of dolphins
⇨ ↑body language, ↑sign language, ⇨ speak the same language at ↑speak(11)
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ verbs
speak a language Can you speak a foreign language?
use a language The children use their native language at home.
learn a language Immigrants are expected to learn the language of their new country.
master a language (=succeed in learning a language well) She had had a long struggle to master the Russian language.
know a language He had lived in Japan, but did not know the language.
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + language
a foreign language He found learning a foreign language extremely difficult.
the English/Japanese/Spanish etc language She had some knowledge of the Spanish language.
sb’s first/native language (=the language someone first learned as a child) His first language was Polish.
a second language (=a language you speak that is not your first language) Most of the students learned English as their second language.
modern languages (=languages that are spoken now) The school has a good modern languages department.
a dead language (=a language that is no longer spoken) She didn’t see the point of learning a dead language.
an official language (=the language used for official business in a country) Canada has two official languages: English and French.
a common language (=a language that more than one person or group speaks, so that they can understand each other) Most of the countries of South America share a common language: Spanish.
■ language + NOUN
the language barrier (=the problem of communicating with someone when you do not speak the same language) Because of the language barrier, it was hard for doctors to give good advice to patients.
a language student/learner Language learners often have problems with tenses.
a language teacher a book for language teachers
language teaching recent developments in language teaching
■ phrases
sb’s command of a language (=someone’s ability to speak a language) Does he have a good command of the language?
• • •
THESAURUS
■ different kinds of language
dialect a form of a language that is spoken in one area of a country, with different words, grammar, or pronunciation from other areas: Cantonese is only one of many Chinese dialects. | the local dialect
accent the way that someone pronounces words, because of where they were born or live, or their social class: Karen has a strong New Jersey accent. | an upper class accent
slang very informal spoken language, used especially by people who belong to a particular group, for example young people or criminals: Teenage slang changes all the time. | ‘Dosh’ is slang for ‘money’.
terminology formal the technical words or expressions that are used in a particular subject: musical terminology | Patients are often unfamiliar with medical terminology.
jargon especially disapproving words and phrases used in a particular profession or subject and which are difficult for other people to understand: The instructions were written in complicated technical jargon. | ‘Outsourcing’ is business jargon for sending work to people outside a company to do. | The letter was full of legal jargon.
■ techniques used in language
metaphor a way of describing something by referring to it as something different and suggesting that it has similar qualities to that thing: The beehive is a metaphor for human society.
simile an expression that describes something by comparing it with something else, using the words as or like, for example ‘as white as snow’: The poet uses the simile ‘soft like clay’.
irony the use of words that are the opposite of what you really mean, often in order to be amusing: ‘I’m so happy to hear that,’ he said, with more than a trace of irony in his voice.
bathos a sudden change from a subject that is beautiful, moral, or serious to something that is ordinary, silly, or not important: The play is too sentimental and full of bathos.
hyperbole a way of describing something by saying that it is much bigger, smaller, worse etc than it actually is – used especially to excite people’s feelings: In his speeches, he used a lot of hyperbole. | journalistic hyperbole
alliteration the use of several words together that all begin with the same sound, in order to make a special effect, especially in poetry: the alliteration of the ‘s’ sound in ‘sweet birds sang softly’
imagery the use of words to describe ideas or actions in a way that makes the reader connect the ideas with pictures in their mind: the use of water imagery in Fitzgerald’s novel ‘The Great Gatsby’ | She uses the imagery of a bird’s song to represent eternal hope.
rhetorical question a question that you ask as a way of making a statement, without expecting an answer: When he said ‘how can these attitudes still exist in a civilized society?’, he was asking a rhetorical question.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

language

lan·guage [language languages]   [ˈlæŋɡwɪdʒ]    [ˈlæŋɡwɪdʒ]  noun

 
OF A COUNTRY
1. countable the system of communication in speech and writing that is used by people of a particular country or area
the Japanese language
It takes a long time to learn to speak a language well.
Italian is my first language.
All the children must learn a foreign language.
She has a good command of the Spanish language.
a qualification in language teaching
They fell in love in spite of the language barrier (= the difficulty of communicating when people speak different languages).
Why study Latin? It's a dead language (= no longer spoken by anyone).
Is English an official language in your country?

see also  modern language  

COMMUNICATION

2. uncountable the use by humans of a system of sounds and words to communicate
• theories about the origins of language

• a study of language acquisition in two-year-olds  

STYLE OF SPEAKING/WRITING

3. uncountable a particular style of speaking or writing
bad/foul/strong language (= words that people may consider offensive)
literary/poetic language
the language of the legal profession
• Give your instructions in everyday language.

see also  bad language  

MOVEMENTS/SYMBOLS/SOUND

4. countable, uncountable a way of expressing ideas and feelings using movements, symbols and sound
the language of mime
the language of dolphins/bees

see also  body language, sign language  

COMPUTING

5. countable, uncountable a system of symbols and rules that is used to operate a computer
a programming language
Idioms: mind your language  talk the same language  
Word Origin:
Middle English: from Old French langage, based on Latin lingua ‘tongue’.  
Thesaurus:
language noun
1. C, U
Italian is my first language.
dialect|formal idiom|literary old-fashioned tongue
speak in a/an language/dialect/idiom/tongue
sb's native language/dialect/tongue
speak/understand/use/learn/study a language/dialect
2. U
The document was written in very formal language.
wordingtermsvocabularyterminologyusage
in… language/terms/vocabulary/terminology/usage
formal/informal/everyday language/terms/vocabulary/usage
use … language/wording/terms/vocabulary/terminology 
Synonyms:
language
vocabulary terms wording terminology
These are all terms for the words and expressions people use when they speak or write, or for a particular style of speaking or writing.
languagea particular style of speaking or writing: Give your instructions in everyday language. the language of the legal profession
vocabularyall the words that a person knows or uses, or all the words in a particular language; the words that people use when they are talking about a particular subject: to have a wide/limited vocabulary The word has become part of advertising vocabulary.
termsa way of expressing yourself or of saying sth: I'll try to explain in simple terms.
wording[usually sing.] the words that are used in a piece of writing or speech, especially when they have been carefully chosen: It was the standard form of wording for a consent letter.
terminology(rather formal) the set of technical words or expressions used in a particular subject; words used with particular meanings: medical terminology Scientists are constantly developing new terminologies.
Literary/poetic terminology is used for talking about literature or poetry. Literary/poetic language is used for writing in a literary or poetic style.
formal/informal/everyday language/vocabulary/terms
business/scientific/technical/specialized language/vocabulary/terminology
A word enters the language/the vocabulary. 
Example Bank:
Computers will never be able to understand natural language.
Her command of language is very advanced for a six-year-old.
His letter was couched in very formal language.
His strength is that he addresses his readers in plain language.
How many foreign languages does she speak?
I got by with broken Chinese and sign language.
Latin is a dead language.
Most local cinemas show films in the original language, with German subtitles.
Not all deaf people use sign language.
Portuguese is the national language of Brazil.
She could speak some Chinese, but never studied the written language.
She grew up in Mexico, so her first language is Spanish.
She reserved her harshest language for those she believed had betrayed her.
Some minority languages are dying out.
The referee told the players to mind their language.
The writer's use of language reflects the personality of each character.
You could tell from his body language that he was very embarrassed.
idiomatic expressions that enrich the language
manuscripts written in an unknown language
new methods of language learning
people using foul language
the teaching of English as a second language
Have you got a qualification in language teaching?
He has a good command of the Spanish language.
Italian is my first language.
She's got a degree in modern languages.
The following programme contains strong language.
They fell in love in spite of the language barrier.
• They were shouting and using bad/foul language.

• Why study Latin? It's a dead language.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

language / ˈlæŋ.ɡwɪdʒ / noun [ C or U ]

A1 a system of communication consisting of sounds, words, and grammar, or the system of communication used by people in a particular country or type of work:

She does research into how children acquire language.

Do you speak any foreign languages?"

I'm hopeless at learning languages.

the English language

legal/technical language

the language of business

Java and Perl are both important computer programming languages (= systems of writing instructions for computers) .

Word partners for language

learn / speak a language • a foreign language • spoken / written language • sb's first / native / second language • the official language • abusive / bad / foul / strong language

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

language

/læŋgwɪdʒ/
(languages)

Frequency: The word is one of the 1500 most common words in English.

1.
A language is a system of communication which consists of a set of sounds and written symbols which are used by the people of a particular country or region for talking or writing.
...the English language...
Students are expected to master a second language...
N-COUNT

2.
Language is the use of a system of communication which consists of a set of sounds or written symbols.
Students examined how children acquire language...
N-UNCOUNT

3.
You can refer to the words used in connection with a particular subject as the language of that subject.
...the language of business.
N-UNCOUNT: the N of n, supp N

4.
You can refer to someone’s use of rude words or swearing as bad language when you find it offensive.
Television companies tend to censor bad language in feature films...
There’s a girl gonna be in the club, so you guys watch your language.
N-UNCOUNT: adj N, poss N

5.
The language of a piece of writing or speech is the style in which it is written or spoken.
...a booklet summarising it in plain language...
The tone of his language was diplomatic and polite...
N-UNCOUNT: with supp

6.
You can use language to refer to various means of communication involving recognizable symbols, non-verbal sounds, or actions.
Some sign languages are very sophisticated means of communication.
...the digital language of computers.
N-VAR: supp N, N of n

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

language

lan·guage /ˈlæŋgwɪʤ/ noun, pl -guag·es
1 a [noncount] : the system of words or signs that people use to express thoughts and feelings to each other
• spoken and written language
• the origin of language
- often used before another noun
language acquisition
language skills
- see also body language
b [count] : any one of the systems of human language that are used and understood by a particular group of people
• the English language
• How many languages do you speak?
• a foreign language
• French is her first/native language.
• The book has been translated into several languages.
• He's learning English as a second language.
• After a few days in France, I realized that I didn't know the language [=I didn't know the French language] as well as I had thought.
• a new word that has recently entered the language
• a language instructor/teacher
• foreign language classes
• A language barrier existed between the two countries. [=people in the two countries did not understand each other because they spoke different languages]
- see also sign language
2 [noncount] : words of a particular kind
• the formal language of the report
• the beauty of Shakespeare's language
• She expressed her ideas using simple and clear language.
• He is always careful in his use of language.
• bad/foul/obscene/strong/vulgar language
• You'd better watch your language [=be careful about the words you use] when you're talking to her.
3 [noncount] : the words and expressions used in a particular activity or by a particular group of people
• the language of diplomacy/lawyers
• legal/military language
4 [count] : a system of signs and symbols that is used to control a computer
• a programming language
5 [count] : a system of sounds or movements by which animals communicate with each other
• the language of bees/dolphins
speak/talk the same language : to understand each other well because of shared ideas and feelings
• She and I will never get along. We just don't speak the same language.

partner

partner [noun]

A person or organization you are closely involved with in some way

US /ˈpɑːrt.nɚ/ 
UK /ˈpɑːt.nər/ 

شریک

مثال: 

He gave up his job as a police officer after his partner was killed.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

partner

 noun

1 your husband, wife, boyfriend or girlfriend

2 one of the people who owns a business

3 a person you are dancing with, or playing a game with

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

partner

I. partner1 S2 W2 AC /ˈpɑːtnə $ ˈpɑːrtnər/ BrE AmE noun [countable]
[Word Family: noun: ↑partner, ↑partnership; verb: ↑partner]
[Date: 1300-1400; Language: Anglo-French; Origin: parcener 'heir sharing half', from Old French parçon 'share'; influenced by part]
1. MARRIAGE ETC one of two people who are married, or who live together and have a sexual relationship ⇨ husband, wife:
Discuss your worries with your partner.
Only 29% of lone parents receive financial support from their former partners.
a sexual partner
2. BUSINESS one of the owners of a business:
She’s a partner in a law firm.
The senior partner has retired. ⇨ ↑sleeping partner
3. DANCING/GAMES ETC someone you do a particular activity with, for example dancing or playing a game against two other people:
Clare’s my tennis partner.
Take your partners for the next dance.
4. COUNTRY/ORGANIZATION a country or organization that another country or organization has an agreement with:
Nigeria is our principal trading partner in Africa.
The group is a junior partner (=less important group) in the PLO’s governing coalition.
5. partners in crime two people who have planned and done something together, especially something that slightly annoys other people – used humorously
⇨ ↑sparring partner

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

partner

part·ner AW [partner partners partnered partnering] noun, verb   [ˈpɑːtnə(r)]    [ˈpɑːrtnər] 

noun
1. the person that you are married to or having a sexual relationship with
• Come to the New Year disco and bring your partner!

• a marriage partner

2. one of the people who owns a business and shares the profits, etc
• a partner in a law firm

• a junior/senior partner

3. a person that you are doing an activity with, such as dancing or playing a game
a dancing/tennis, etc. partner

see also  sparring partner

4. a country or an organization that has an agreement with another country
a trading partner
see also  sleeping partner  
Word Origin:
Middle English: alteration of parcener ‘partner, joint heir’, from Anglo-Norman French parcener, based on Latin partitio(n-) ‘partition’. The change in the first syllable was due to association with part.  
Thesaurus:
partner noun
1. C
Come to the New Year disco and bring your partner.
girlfriendboyfriendwifehusbandmanfiancé/fiancée|especially AmE date|formal law spouse|becoming old-fashioned sweetheart
sb's new partner/girlfriend/boyfriend/wife/husband/man
have a partner/girlfriend/boyfriend/wife/husband/man/fiance/fiancee/spouse
find a partner/girlfriend/boyfriend/man
Which word? A partner is usually sb you live with but are not married to and suggests a more long-term relationship. Young people often prefer to use the words girlfriend/boyfriend. Partner can also refer to a husband or wife, especially if you do not know, or it is not important, if a couple is married or not. Partner is also used when you do not know or are not interested in what sex sb's partner is.
2. C
He is a senior partner in a law firm.
Choose a partner for the next activity.
colleaguecollaboratorco-workerteammatecontactallyassociate|especially BrE workmate
a business partner/colleague/contact/ally
a junior/senior partner/colleague/associate
a close partner/colleague/collaborator/contact/ally/associate 
Collocations:
Marriage and divorce
Romance
fall/be (madly/deeply/hopelessly) in love (with sb)
be/believe in/fall in love at first sight
be/find true love/the love of your life
suffer (from) (the pains/pangs of) unrequited love
have/feel/show/express great/deep/genuine affection for sb/sth
meet/marry your husband/wife/partner/fiancé/fiancée/boyfriend/girlfriend
have/go on a (blind) date
be going out with/ (especially NAmE) dating a guy/girl/boy/man/woman
move in with/live with your boyfriend/girlfriend/partner
Weddings
get/be engaged/married/divorced
arrange/plan a wedding
have a big wedding/a honeymoon/a happy marriage
have/enter into an arranged marriage
call off/cancel/postpone your wedding
invite sb to/go to/attend a wedding/a wedding ceremony/a wedding reception
conduct/perform a wedding ceremony
exchange rings/wedding vows/marriage vows
congratulate/toast/raise a glass to the happy couple
be/go on honeymoon (with your wife/husband)
celebrate your first (wedding) anniversary
Separation and divorce
be unfaithful to/ (informal) cheat on your husband/wife/partner/fiancé/fiancée/boyfriend/girlfriend
have an affair (with sb)
break off/end an engagement/a relationship
break up with/split up with/ (informal) dump your boyfriend/girlfriend
separate from/be separated from/leave/divorce your husband/wife
annul/dissolve a marriage
apply for/ask for/go through/get a divorce
get/gain/be awarded/have/lose custody of the children
pay alimony/child support (to your ex-wife/husband) 
Example Bank:
AOL remains the company's only online retail partner.
All change partners for the next dance!
Britain's partner in the aeronautic project
France's principal trading partners
He has recently been made a junior partner in the family business.
He is a general partner in a consulting firm.
He penned the script with his long-time writing partner.
He was made a full partner in his father's firm.
I need a doubles partner for the table tennis tournament.
Local government workers have been refused pensions for their unmarried partners.
Most of those questioned said they wanted a steady partner for emotional support.
People who have had multiple partners are more at risk from sexually transmitted diseases.
She and her husband became limited partners in the team's ownership.
She was the dominant partner in the relationship.
The government is technically a silent partner with almost no control over contractor spending.
The old political sparring partners are now firm friends.
The organization offers health benefits to the domestic partners of employees.
The teacher asked the students to choose a partner for the next activity.
They wanted to be seen as equal partners in the creative relationship.
We are working with partner companies on wireless technologies.
reasons for divorce such as having an abusive partner
the choice of marriage partner
Come to the New Year disco and bring your partner.
• My regular dancing partner has broken her ankle.

• This is my partner, Mark.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

partner / ˈpɑːt.nə r /   / ˈpɑːrt.nɚ / noun [ C ]

a person or organization you are closely involved with in some way:

He gave up his job as a police officer after his partner was killed.

The two companies are partners in a contract to build a new power station.

B2 one of the owners of a company:

He's a partner in an insurance company/a law firm.

B1 the person you are married to or living with as if you were married to them, or the person you are having a sexual relationship with:

I've invited David and his partner over for dinner.

A2 one of a pair of dancers or one of a pair who are playing a sport or a game together, especially when the pair are playing as a team

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

partner

/pɑ:(r)tnə(r)/
(partners, partnering, partnered)

Frequency: The word is one of the 1500 most common words in English.

1.
Your partner is the person you are married to or are having a romantic or sexual relationship with.
Wanting other friends doesn’t mean you don’t love your partner.
...his choice of marriage partner.
N-COUNT: oft poss N

2.
Your partner is the person you are doing something with, for example dancing with or playing with in a game against two other people.
My partner for the event was the marvellous American player.
...a partner in crime.
N-COUNT

3.
The partners in a firm or business are the people who share the ownership of it. (BUSINESS)
He’s a partner in a Chicago law firm.
N-COUNT

4.
The partner of a country or organization is another country or organization with which they work or do business.
Spain has been one of Cuba’s major trading partners.
N-COUNT: usu with supp

5.
If you partner someone, you are their partner in a game or in a dance.
He had partnered the famous Russian ballerina...
He will be partnered by Ian Baker, the defending champion...
He partnered Andre Agassi to victory.
VERB: V n, be V-ed by/with n, V n to n

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1part·ner /ˈpɑɚtnɚ/ noun, pl -ners [count]
1 : someone's husband or wife or the person someone has sexual relations with
• His partner, his wife of 20 years, was shocked to hear about his accident.
• marital/sexual/same-sex partners
- see also domestic partner
2 : one of two or more people, businesses, etc., that work together or do business together
• They are partners in the real estate business.
• law partners
• Singapore's most important trading partner is Indonesia.
• She was a senior partner at the Wall Street firm.
- see also silent partner partner in crime at crime
3 : someone who participates in an activity or game with another person
• We were each assigned a partner for the project.
• a golf/tennis/dance partner
- see also sparring partner

no-brainer

no-brainer [noun]

Something such as a decision that is very easy or obvious

US /ˌnoʊˈbreɪ.nɚ/ 
UK /ˌnəʊˈbreɪ.nər/ 
مثال: 

The decision was a complete no-brainer.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

no-brainer

ˌno-ˈbrainer BrE AmE noun [singular]
a decision that is easy, and that you do not need to think about, used when you want to emphasize that it is really very easy:
Joining the savings plan is a no-brainer. Just do it.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

no-brainer

ˌno-ˈbrain·er 7 [no-brainer]       noun (informal)
a decision or a problem that you do not need to think about much because it is obvious what you should do
The question of who to support in this election should be a no-brainer.

Providing a survivor benefit for a spouse is a no-brainer for most people

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

no-brainer / ˌnəʊˈbreɪ.nə r /   / ˌnoʊˈbreɪ.nɚ / noun [ S ] slang

something such as a decision that is very easy or obvious:

The decision was a complete no-brainer.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

no-brainer

/noʊ breɪnə(r)/
(no-brainers)

1.
If you describe a question or decision as a no-brainer, you mean that it is a very easy one to answer or make. (AM INFORMAL)
If it’s illegal for someone under 21 to drive, it should be illegal for them to drink and drive. That’s a no-brainer.
N-COUNT

2.
If you describe a person or action as a no-brainer, you mean that they are stupid. (AM INFORMAL)
N-COUNT [disapproval]

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

no-brainer

no–brain·er /ˈnoʊˈbreɪnɚ/ noun, pl -ers [count] informal : a decision or choice that is very easy to make and requires very little thought
• The offer of a full scholarship made his choice of colleges a no-brainer.

explosion

explosion [noun] (BURST)

The fact of something such as a bomb exploding

US /ɪkˈsploʊ.ʒən/ 
UK /ɪkˈspləʊ.ʒən/ 

انفجار

مثال: 

The fire was thought to have been caused by a gas explosion.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

explosion

 noun
the sudden bursting and loud noise of something such as a bomb exploding:
There was an explosion and pieces of glass flew everywhere.
The verb is explode.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

explosion

explosion W3 /ɪkˈspləʊʒən $ -ˈsploʊ-/ BrE AmE noun
[Word Family: adjective: exploding, ↑explosive, ↑exploded, ↑unexploded; noun: ↑explosion, ↑explosive; verb: ↑explode; adverb: ↑explosively]
1. [countable] a loud sound and the energy produced by something such as a bomb bursting into small pieces ⇨ explode
bomb/gas/nuclear explosion
Several people were injured in a bomb explosion.
We heard a loud explosion.
huge/massive etc explosion
A massive explosion ripped through the building.
2. [uncountable and countable] a process in which something such as a bomb is deliberately made to explode:
Police carried out a controlled explosion of the device.
3. [countable] a sudden or quick increase in the number or amount of something:
the population explosion in India
explosion of
the recent explosion of interest in Latin music and dance
4. [countable] a sudden expression of emotion, especially anger SYN outburst
5. [countable] a sudden very loud noise
explosion of
an explosion of laughter
• • •
COLLOCATIONS (for Meanings 1 & 2)
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + explosion
a big explosion There has been a big explosion in the centre of Paris.
a huge/massive/enormous explosion An enormous explosion tore the roof off the building.
a tremendous explosion (=very big and powerful) The torpedo struck the side of the ship, followed by a tremendous explosion.
a powerful explosion The powerful explosion was heard from Portland, Maine to Albany, New York.
a major explosion formal We are getting reports of a major explosion at the oil refinery.
a loud explosion We heard several loud explosions followed by an eerie silence.
a deafening explosion (=extremely loud) The building collapsed in a deafening explosion.
an almighty explosion old-fashioned (=extremely loud) There was an almighty explosion and I was knocked to the ground.
a muffled explosion (=one that is not heard very clearly) We could just make out a muffled explosion from deep inside the mine.
a nuclear/atomic explosion This is the site of the first ever nuclear explosion.
a gas explosion Firefighters say that a gas explosion destroyed the building.
a volcanic explosion (=one caused by a volcano) You could see where a volcanic explosion had blown the mountain peak away.
■ verbs
cause an explosion The police do not yet know what caused the explosion.
set off/trigger an explosion (=cause an explosion) Investigators believe a fuel leak may have triggered the explosion.
carry out an explosion (=cause one deliberately) By 1942, the United States had carried out test explosions with nuclear bombs.
hear an explosion Marie was reading in bed when she heard the explosion.
an explosion takes place/happens The largest explosion took place at the main post office.
an explosion occurs formal The explosion occurred just off the coast of Greece.
an explosion shakes something A series of explosions shook the building.
an explosion destroys something Seven people died when the explosion destroyed the bus.
an explosion kills somebody Last year, an underground explosion killed 82 miners.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS (for Meaning 3)
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + explosion
a sudden explosion Henry thought she was going to laugh, but then there was a sudden explosion of sobbing.
a population explosion The decision not to plant the fields led to a population explosion in rabbits.
■ phrases
an explosion of interest in something There has been an explosion of interest in networking websites in the last few years.
an explosion of violence The army had to cope with the explosion of violence that followed the elections.
an explosion of anger The verdict was greeted by an explosion of public anger.
an explosion of colour literary After the rain, the desert bloomed in an explosion of color.
• • •
THESAURUS
■ a very big increase
explosion noun [countable] a sudden very large increase in the amount or number of something: There has been an explosion in the number of fast food restaurants. | The country experienced a population explosion. | The book caused an explosion of interest in Renaissance Italy.
boom noun [singular] a sudden large increase in trade, profits or sales, with the result that a country, company, or industry becomes very successful. Boom is also used about a sudden increase in interest in something, with the result that it becomes very popular: the German economic boom of the 1960s | the Internet boom | There has been a boom in sales of diet books and videos.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

explosion

ex·plo·sion [explosion explosions]   [ɪkˈspləʊʒn]    [ɪkˈsploʊʒn]  noun
1. countable, uncountable the sudden violent bursting and loud noise of sth such as a bomb exploding; the act of deliberately causing sth to explode
a bomb/nuclear/gas explosion
There were two loud explosions and then the building burst into flames.
Bomb Squad officers carried out a controlled explosion of the device.

300 people were injured in the explosion.

2. countable a large, sudden or rapid increase in the amount or number of sth
a population explosion
an explosion of interest in learning Japanese

an explosion in oil prices

3. countable (formal) a sudden, violent expression of emotion, especially anger
Syn:  outburst
Do you know what brought on that explosion?
Demonstrators clashed with riot police in an explosion of anger at live animal exports.  
Word Origin:
early 17th cent.: from Latin explosio(n-) ‘scornful rejection’, from the verb explodere ‘drive out by clapping, hiss off the stage’, from ex- ‘out’ + plaudere ‘to clap’.  
Thesaurus:
explosion noun C
The explosion destroyed the building.
journalism blast
a loud/deafening/powerful/massive/huge explosion/blast
a bomb/gas/chemical/nuclear explosion/blast
a/an explosion/blast rips through/rocks sth 
Example Bank:
3 people were injured in the explosion.
A huge explosion rocked the entire building.
A loud explosion echoed around the valley.
A massive explosion erupted behind him.
A massive explosion ripped through the chemical works.
An explosion blew out the front windows.
Bomb disposal experts carried out a controlled explosion on the suspect package.
How can we keep up with the information explosion?
I believe we will see an explosion in lawsuits of this kind.
If no action is taken, the country runs the risk of a social explosion.
In the 1860s a veritable explosion of major scientific publications took place.
The build-up of gas caused a small explosion.
The explosion came 20 minutes after a coded warning to the police.
The explosion caused major structural damage.
The explosion occurred just after midday.
The explosion shook nearby homes.
The floor shook with a distant explosion.
The shock waves of this political explosion engulfed the whole of Europe.
There was a muffled explosion somewhere on their right.
a great explosion of creativity
a nuclear test explosion
a sudden explosion in the number of students
a sudden explosion of anger
The explosion sent a large cloud of smoke and dust into the air.

The world changed with the explosion of the first atomic bomb.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

explosion / ɪkˈspləʊ.ʒ ə n /   / -ˈsploʊ- / noun [ C or U ] (BURST)

explosion

B2 the fact of something such as a bomb exploding:

The fire was thought to have been caused by a gas explosion.

The explosion (= the intentional exploding) of nuclear devices in the Bikini Atoll was stopped in 1958.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

explosion

/ɪksploʊʒ(ə)n/
(explosions)

Frequency: The word is one of the 3000 most common words in English.

1.
An explosion is a sudden, violent burst of energy, for example one caused by a bomb.
After the second explosion, all of London’s main train and subway stations were shut down...
Three people have been killed in a bomb explosion in northwest Spain.
= blast
N-COUNT

2.
Explosion is the act of deliberately causing a bomb or similar device to explode.
Bomb disposal experts blew up the bag in a controlled explosion...
N-VAR

3.
An explosion is a large rapid increase in the number or amount of something.
The study also forecast an explosion in the diet soft-drink market...
The spread of the suburbs has triggered a population explosion among America’s deer.
N-COUNT: with supp

4.
An explosion is a sudden violent expression of someone’s feelings, especially anger.
Every time they met, Myra anticipated an explosion...
= outburst
N-COUNT

5.
An explosion is a sudden and serious political protest or violence.
...the explosion of protest and violence sparked off by the killing of seven workers.
N-COUNT

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

explosion

ex·plo·sion /ɪkˈsploʊʒən/ noun, pl -sions [count]
1 : the sudden, loud, and violent release of energy that happens when something (such as a bomb) breaks apart in a way that sends parts flying outward
• The filmmakers staged the car's explosion.
• The island was rocked by a series of volcanic explosions.
• set off an explosion
2 a : a sudden and very fast increase
• The region has experienced a population explosion.
• an explosion of interest
b : a sudden expression of some strong emotion
• an explosion of anger
c : a sudden occurrence of laughter
• His comments prompted an explosion of laughter from the crowd.

dumpling

dumpling [noun]

A small ball of dough (= flour and water mixed together) , cooked, and eaten with meat and vegetables a small amount of fruit covered in a sweet dough and baked

US /ˈdʌm.plɪŋ/ 
UK /ˈdʌm.plɪŋ/ 
dumpling - پودینگ

نوعى پودينگ که محتوى ميوه پخته است

مثال: 

apple dumplings

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

dumpling

dumpling /ˈdʌmplɪŋ/ BrE AmE noun [countable]
[Date: 1600-1700; Origin: Perhaps from lump]
1. a round lump of flour and fat mixed with water, cooked in boiling liquid and served with meat:
chicken and dumplings
2. a sweet dish made of ↑pastry filled with fruit:
apple dumplings

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

dumpling

dump·ling [dumpling dumplings]   [ˈdʌmplɪŋ]    [ˈdʌmplɪŋ]  noun
1. a small ball of dough (= a mixture of flour, fat and water) that is cooked and served with meat dishes

• chicken with herb dumplings

2. a small ball of pastry, often with fruit in it, eaten as a dessert
apple dumplings  
Word Origin:

early 17th cent.: apparently from the rare adjective dump ‘of the consistency of dough’, although dumpling is recorded much earlier.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

dumpling / ˈdʌm.plɪŋ / noun [ C ]

a small ball of dough (= flour and water mixed together) , cooked, and eaten with meat and vegetables a small amount of fruit covered in a sweet dough and baked:

apple dumplings

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

dumpling

/dʌmplɪŋ/
(dumplings)

Dumplings are small lumps of dough that are cooked and eaten, either with meat and vegetables or as part of a sweet pudding.

N-VAR

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

dumpling

dump·ling /ˈdʌmplɪŋ/ noun, pl -lings [count]
1 : a small lump of dough that is boiled or steamed
• chicken and dumplings
2 : a piece of food that is wrapped in dough and cooked
• We had vegetarian/pork dumplings as an appetizer.
• an apple dumpling

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