verb

fast-forward

fast-forward [verb]

If you fast-forward a recording, or if it fast-forwards, you make it play at very high speed so that you get to the end or a later part more quickly

US /ˌfæstˈfɔːr.wɚd/ 
UK /ˌfɑːstˈfɔː.wəd/ 

جلو بردن

مثال: 

I hate this song - I'll fast-forward to the next one.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

fast-forward

ˌfast-ˈforward BrE AmE verb [intransitive and transitive]
1. to wind a tape or video forwards quickly without playing it
2. to move quickly to a later point in a story
fast-forward to
Fast-forward to York at the turn of the century.
—fast-forward noun [uncountable]

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

fast-forward

ˌfast-ˈforward [fast forward fast-forward]       verb

1. transitive, intransitive ~ (sth) to wind a tape or video forward without playing it

2. intransitive ~ to sth | + adv./prep. to move quickly forwards in time, especially to a later point in a story
The action then fast-forwards to Ettore as a young man.

Derived Word: fast forward

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

ˌ fast- ˈ forward / ˌfɑːstˈfɔː.wəd /   / ˌfæstˈfɔːr.wɚd / verb [ I or T ]

If you fast-forward a recording, or if it fast-forwards, you make it play at very high speed so that you get to the end or a later part more quickly:

I hate this song - I'll fast-forward to the next one.

The tape jammed while I was fast-forwarding it.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

fast forward

also fast-forward
(fast forwards, fast forwarding, fast forwarded)

1.
When you fast forward the tape in a video or tape recorder or when you fast forward, you make the tape go forwards. Compare rewind.
Just fast forward the video...
He fast-forwarded the tape past the explosion...
The urge to fast-forward is almost irresistible.
VERB: V n, V n prep/adv, V, also V prep/adv

2.
If you put a video or cassette tape on fast forward, you make the tape go forwards. Compare rewind.
Before recording onto a new tape, wind it on fast forward, then rewind...
N-UNCOUNT: oft on N

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

fast-forward

2fast–forward verb -wards; -ward·ed; -ward·ing
1 [+ obj] : to cause (a recording) to go forward at a speed that is faster than normal
• We fast-forwarded the tape to get to the last song.
- opposite 1rewind
2 [no obj] : to move forward through time quickly
• He wished he could fast-forward to the future, when he would no longer be a student.

punish

punish [verb] (CRIME)

to cause someone who has done something wrong or committed a crime to suffer, by hurting them, forcing them to pay money, sending them to prison, etc.

US /ˈpʌn.ɪʃ/ 
UK /ˈpʌn.ɪʃ/ 

تنبيه‌ كردن‌، ادب‌ كردن‌،

مثال: 

He punished his children.

او فرزندانش را تنبیه کرد.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

punish

 verb (punishes, punishing, punished )
to make somebody suffer because they have done something wrong:
The children were punished for telling lies.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

punish

punish /ˈpʌnɪʃ/ BrE AmE verb [transitive]
[Word Family: adjective: ↑punishable, ↑punishing, ↑unpunished, ↑punitive; verb: ↑punish; noun: ↑punishment]
[Date: 1300-1400; Language: Old French; Origin: punir, from Latin punire, from poena; ⇨ ↑pain1]
1. to make someone suffer because they have done something wrong or broken the law ⇨ punishment, punitive:
Smacking is not an acceptable way of punishing a child.
He promised to punish severely any officials found guilty of electoral fraud.
punish somebody for (doing) something
It’s unfair to punish a whole class for the actions of one or two students.
They deserve to be punished for putting passengers at risk.
I felt I was being punished for what my mother had done.
punish somebody by doing something
My parents decided to punish me by withdrawing financial support.
punish somebody with something
The House voted to punish the senator with a formal reprimand.
2. [usually passive] if a crime is punished in a particular way, anyone who is guilty of it is made to suffer in that way ⇨ punishment, punitive
punish by/with
In some societies, theft is punished by death.
3. punish yourself to make yourself feel guilty or bad for something you have done:
If you fail, don’t punish yourself.

THESAURUS
punish to do something unpleasant to someone because they have done something wrong or broken the law: Drug smugglers are severely punished. | She wanted to punish him for deceiving her.
fine to make someone pay money as a punishment: The company was fined for safety violations.
sentence if a judge sentences a criminal, he or she gives them an official punishment, usually sending them to prison for a period of time: The judge sentenced Margolis to a year in prison.
penalize (also penalise British English) to officially punish someone, especially by taking away their right to do something or by limiting their freedom in some way: New laws will penalize firms that continue to pollute the environment.
discipline to punish someone who has broken the rules of an organization that they belong to or work for: Officers are expected to discipline soldiers who do not keep their uniforms in good condition.
come down hard on somebody informal to punish someone or criticize them severely: The judge came down hard on Harris, saying that his crime was ‘inexcusable’.
make an example of somebody to punish someone so that other people are afraid to do the same thing: Athletics officials felt they had to make an example of him for using banned drugs.
teach somebody a lesson informal to do something in order to show someone that they must not do something again, when they have behaved very badly: I didn't want to hurt him - I just wanted teach him a lesson. | Maybe a night in jail will teach him a lesson.
make somebody pay (for something) informal to make someone wish they had never done something, by making them suffer: We should make him pay for all the mischief he's caused!

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

punish

 

pun·ish [punish punishes punished punishing]   [ˈpʌnɪʃ]    [ˈpʌnɪʃ]  verb
1. to make sb suffer because they have broken the law or done sth wrong
~ sb Those responsible for this crime will be severely punished.
• My parents used to punish me by not letting me watch TV.

~ sb for sth/for doing sth He was punished for refusing to answer their questions.

2. ~ sth (by/with sth) to set the punishment for a particular crime

• In those days murder was always punished with the death penalty.

3. ~ yourself (for sth) to blame yourself for sth that has happened
Verb forms:

 
Word Origin:
Middle English: from Old French puniss-, lengthened stem of punir ‘punish’, from Latin punire, from poena ‘penalty’.  
Thesaurus:
punish verb T
He was punished for refusing to answer their questions.
disciplinepenalizesentence|informal come down on sb
Opp: reward
punish/discipline/penalize/sentence/come down on sb for doing sth
punish/penalize/sentence/come down on an offender
punish/penalize (bad, unacceptable, etc.) behaviour  
Example Bank:
Damages are not designed to punish, but to compensate for the loss sustained.
He was trying to punish her for deserting him all those years ago.
Never punish children by making them go hungry.
Offenders will be punished with a £1 000 fine.
They will be severely punished for their crimes.
Those found guilty will be punished accordingly.
Those who had opposed the court were duly punished.
He is guilty of contempt of court and is liable to be punished accordingly.
• I would not hesitate to condemn and punish unacceptable behaviour.

• The state is no longer effective in punishing crime.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

punish / ˈpʌn.ɪʃ / verb [ T ] (CRIME)

B1 to cause someone who has done something wrong or committed a crime to suffer, by hurting them, forcing them to pay money, sending them to prison, etc.:

Those responsible for these crimes must be brought to court and punished.

He punished the class by giv ing them extra work.

The oil company was found guilty on ten counts of pollution, and was punished with a $250 million fine.

→  See also punitive

to punish anyone who commits a particular crime:

Drunken driving can be punished with a prison sentence.

 

punish / ˈpʌn.ɪʃ / verb [ T ] (TREAT BADLY)

to use or treat something badly, violently, or without care:

He really punishes that horse of his.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

punish

[pʌ̱nɪʃ]
 punishes, punishing, punished
 1) VERB To punish someone means to make them suffer in some way because they have done something wrong.
  [V n] I don't believe that George ever had to punish the children...
  [V n] According to present law, the authorities can only punish smugglers with small fines...
  [V n for n] Don't punish your child for being honest.
 2) VERB To punish a crime means to punish anyone who commits that crime.
  [V n] The government voted to punish corruption in sport with up to four years in jail...
  [V n] Such behaviour is unacceptable and will be punished.

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

punish

pun·ish /ˈpʌnɪʃ/ verb -ish·es; -ished; -ish·ing [+ obj]
1 a : to make (someone) suffer for a crime or for bad behavior
• I think that murderers should be punished by/with life imprisonment.
• She was punished for lying.
• His parents punished him by taking away his allowance.
b : to make someone suffer for (a crime or bad behavior)
• How should I punish my child's misbehavior?
• State law punishes fraud with fines.
• The law states that treason shall be punished by death. [=that the punishment for treason is death]
2 : to treat (someone or something) severely or roughly
• I don't understand why women continue to punish [=damage] their feet by wearing high-heeled shoes.

 

brainstorm

brainstorm [verb]

(of a group of people) to suggest a lot of ideas for a future activity very quickly before considering some of them more carefully

US /ˈbreɪn.stɔːrm/ 
UK /ˈbreɪn.stɔːm/ 

ذهن‌ انگيزى كردن‌

مثال: 

The team got together to brainstorm (the project).

The team got together to brainstorm (the project).

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

brainstorm

I. brainstorm /ˈbreɪnstɔːm $ -stɔːrm/ BrE AmE noun
1. [countable usually singular] American English a sudden clever idea SYN brainwave British English:
Kirby had a sudden brainstorm.
2. [countable] British English informal if you have a brainstorm, you are suddenly unable to think clearly or sensibly:
I must have had a brainstorm that afternoon.
II. See main entry: ↑brainstorming

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

2. (NAmE) =  brainwave

II. brain·storm [brainstorm brainstorms brainstormed brainstorming]   [ˈbreɪnstɔːm]  ;   [ˈbreɪnstɔːrm]  verb transitive, intransitive

~ (sth) Brainstorm as many ideas as possible.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

brainstorm / ˈbreɪn.stɔːm /   / -stɔːrm / verb [ I or T ]

(of a group of people) to suggest a lot of ideas for a future activity very quickly before considering some of them more carefully:

The team got together to brainstorm (the project).

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

brainstorm

/breɪnstɔ:(r)m/
(brainstorms, brainstorming, brainstormed)

1.
If you have a brainstorm, you suddenly become unable to think clearly. (BRIT)
I can have a brainstorm and be very extravagant.
N-COUNT

2.
If you have a brainstorm, you suddenly have a clever idea. (AM; in BRIT, usually use brainwave)
‘Look,’ she said, getting a brainstorm, ‘Why don’t you invite them here?’
= brainwave
N-COUNT

3.
If a group of people brainstorm, they have a meeting in which they all put forward as many ideas and suggestions as they can think of.
The women meet twice a month to brainstorm and set business goals for each other...
We can brainstorm a list of the most influential individuals in the company.
VERB: V, V n
brain‧storming
Hundreds of ideas had been tried and discarded during two years of brainstorming.
N-UNCOUNT

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

brainstorm

2brainstorm verb -storms; -stormed; -storm·ing : to try to solve a problem by talking with other people : to discuss a problem and suggest solutions

[no obj]

• We need to brainstorm about this.

[+ obj]

• They had a meeting to brainstorm some ideas.
- brainstorming noun [noncount]
• We did some brainstorming and came up with some ideas.
• We had a brainstorming session.

check

check [verb] (EXAMINE)

To make certain that something or someone is correct, safe, or suitable by examining it or them quickly

US /tʃek/ 
UK /tʃek/ 

چک کردن، بررسى‌ كردن‌

مثال: 

You should always check your oil, water, and tyres before taking your car on a long trip.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

 verb (checks, checking, checked )

1 to look at something to see that it is right, good or safe:
Do the sums and then use a calculator to check your answers.
Before driving off, I checked the oil and water.
Check that all the windows are closed before you leave.

2 American English for tick1?

check in to tell the person at the desk in a hotel or an airport that you have arrived:
I have to check in an hour before my flight.

check out to pay your bill and leave a hotel

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

check

I. check1 S1 W2 /tʃek/ BrE AmE verb
1. FIND OUT [intransitive and transitive] to do something in order to find out whether something really is correct, true, or in good condition:
Check the tiles carefully before you buy them.
A first rule in solving any mystery is to check the facts.
Fill in the cash book carefully and always check your calculations.
check (that)
Check that all the doors are locked securely.
check whether/how/who etc
Let me just check whether the potatoes are cooked.
They paused to check how the other climbers were getting on.
check (something) for something
I checked the typing for errors.
Turn the tap on and check for leaks.
check something against/with something (=compare something with something else to see whether they are the same)
You must check the evidence against other sources and decide if it is reliable.
Positive test results are double-checked (=looked at twice) to make absolutely sure.
2. ASK SOMEBODY [intransitive and transitive] to ask someone whether something is correct, true, or allowed:
I’m not authorized to give you a refund – I’ll have to check first.
check (that)
Make a phone call to check that you’re writing to the right person.
check whether/how/who etc
Call the factory to check whether the beds can be delivered today.
check with
Check with your doctor before going on a diet.
3. NOT DO SOMETHING [transitive] to suddenly stop yourself from saying or doing something because you realize it would be better not to:
I had to check the urge to laugh out loud.
check yourself
He grinned, and then checked himself, not wanting to upset Jack.
4. STOP SOMETHING [transitive] to stop something bad from getting worse or continuing to happen:
The police are failing to take adequate measures to check the growth in crime.
5. BAGS/CASES ETC [transitive] American English, check in British English to leave your bags at an official place so they can be put on a plane or a train, or to take someone’s bags in order to do this:
Any luggage over five kilos must be checked.
6. MAKE A MARK [transitive] American English to make a mark (✓ ) next to an answer, something on a list etc to show you have chosen it, that it is correct, or that you have dealt with it SYN tick British English
7. Check especially American English spoken say this when someone mentions each thing on a list, to tell them that you have it or have done it:
‘Passport?’ ‘Check.’ ‘Ticket?’ ‘Check’.
• • •
THESAURUS
check to look at something carefully and thoroughly in order to make sure that it is correct, safe, or working properly: I’ll just check the water level in the battery. | The immigration officer checked their passports. | We need to check the building for structural damage.
examine to look at something carefully and thoroughly because you want to find out something about it: Experts who examined the painting believe it is genuine. | The police will examine the weapon for fingerprints.
inspect to look at something carefully and thoroughly in order to make sure that it is correct, safe, or working properly, especially when it is your job to do this: The building is regularly inspected by a fire-safety officer. | Some insurance people have already been here to inspect the damage caused by the storm.
go through something to examine something such as a document or plan from beginning to end, especially in order to check that it is correct: You should go through the contract before you sign. | I’ve finished my essay, but I just need to go through it to check for spelling mistakes.
double-check to check something again so that you are completely sure it is correct, safe, or working properly: I double-checked all my calculations and they seemed fine. | Travellers should double-check flight information before setting off today.
test to examine or use something in order to find out whether it works or what its qualities are, or in order to check that it is satisfactory: Test your brakes to check they are working correctly. | These products have not been tested on animals.
monitor to carefully watch or keep checking someone or something in order to see what happens over a period of time: Doctors monitored her progress during the night. | Observers have been monitoring the situation in Burma closely.
check in phrasal verb
1. if you check in or are checked in at a hotel or airport, you go to the desk and report that you have arrived:
Check in two hours before the flight.
check in at
He checked in at the Europa Hotel.
check somebody ↔ in
Airline employees were checking in passengers. ⇨ ↑check-in
2. check something ↔ in to leave your bags at an official place so they can be put on a plane or a train, or to take someone’s bags in order to do this:
I said goodbye and went to check in my suitcases.
3. American English to call someone to tell them that you are safe or where you are:
He just called to check in and tell them how he was doing.
check something ↔ off phrasal verb
to write a mark next to something on a list to show that you have chosen it, dealt with it, or made sure that it is correct:
One by one he checked them off on his register.
check on somebody/something phrasal verb
1. to make sure that someone or something is safe, is in a satisfactory state, or is doing what they should be doing:
Honey, can you go upstairs and check on the kids?
My neighbour comes in once a week to check on things and feed the fish.
2. to try to find out if something is true or correct:
He wanted to check on the girl’s story.
check out phrasal verb
1. MAKE SURE
a) check something ↔ out to make sure that something is actually true, correct, or acceptable SYN investigate:
I made a phone call to check out his address.
check something ↔ out with
Check it out with your boss before you do anything.
b) if information checks out, it is proved to be true, correct, or acceptable:
His credit record checks out.
2. LOOK AT SOMEBODY/SOMETHING check somebody/something ↔ out to look at someone or something because they are interesting or attractive:
If I hear about a website that sounds interesting, I check it out.
Hey, check out that car!
3. GET INFORMATION check somebody ↔ out informal to get information about someone, especially to find out if they are suitable for something:
I’ll check them out as potential employers.
4. HOTEL to leave a hotel after paying the bill:
We checked out at noon. ⇨ ↑checkout
5. BOOKS check something ↔ out American English to borrow a book from a library:
The library allows you to check out six books at a time.
check something/somebody ↔ over phrasal verb
1. to look closely at something to make sure it is correct or acceptable:
They spent the rest of the morning checking over their equipment.
2. to examine someone to make sure they are healthy:
I’d like the doctor to check you over and do a few tests.
check up on somebody/something phrasal verb
1. to try to find out if someone is doing what they said they would do or what you want them to do:
Don’t worry; no one is going to check up on you.
2. to make sure that something is true or correct:
Dustin called me to check up on some facts.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

check

check [check checks checked checking] verb, noun, exclamation   [tʃek]    [tʃek]

verb  

EXAMINE
1. transitive ~ sth (for sth) to examine sth to see if it is correct, safe or acceptable
Check the container for cracks or leaks.
She gave me the minutes of the meeting to read and check.
Check the oil and water before setting off.
• Check your work before handing it in.

• Customs officers have the right to check all luggage going through customs.  

MAKE SURE

2. intransitive, transitive to find out if sth/sb is present, correct or true or if sth is how you think it is
‘Is Mary in the office?’ ‘Just a moment. I'll go and check.’
~ sth Hang on— I just need to check my email.
~ (that)… Go and check (that) I've locked the windows.
~ (with sb) (what/whether, etc…) You'd better check with Jane what time she's expecting us tonight.

see also  cross-check, double-check  

CONTROL

3. transitive ~ sth to control sth; to stop sth from increasing or getting worse
• The government is determined to check the growth of public spending.

• She tied some strips of cloth around the wound to check the bleeding.

4. transitive to stop yourself from saying or doing sth or from showing a particular emotion
~ sth to check your anger/laughter/tears

~ yourself She wanted to tell him the whole truth but she checked herself— it wasn't the right moment.  

COATS/BAGS/CASES

5. transitive ~ sth (NAmE) to leave coats, bags, etc. in an official place (called a checkroom) while you are visiting a club, restaurant, etc

• Do you want to check your coats?

6. transitive ~ sth (NAmE) to leave bags or cases with an official so that they can be put on a plane or train

• How many bags are you checking?  

MAKE MARK

7. transitive ~ sth (NAmE) (BrE tick) to put a mark (✓) next to an item on a list, an answer, etc
Check the box next to the right answer.
 
Word Origin:
v. and exclam. n. senses 1 to 4 and n. senses 6 to 10 Middle English Old French eschec medieval Latin scaccus Arabic Persian šāh ‘king’ Old French eschequier ‘play chess, put in check’ ‘stop or control’ ‘examine the accuracy of’
n. sense 5 late Middle English
 
Thesaurus:
check verb
1. T
Check your work before handing it in.
inspectexaminego over sthcheck over sb/sthcheck through sthlook at sth|business audit
check/inspect/examine/check over/check through sth for sth
check/inspect/examine/look at sth to see if/whether…
check/inspect/examine/go over/check over/check through/look at sth carefully
Check, inspect or examine? These words can all be used when you are looking for possible problems. Only check is used about looking for mistakes:  ¤ Inspect/Examine your work before handing it in. Only examine is used when looking for the cause of a problem:
The doctor examined her but could find nothing wrong.
 ¤ The doctor checked/inspected her but could find nothing wrong.
2. I, T
Go and check that I've locked the windows.
make sure|formal verifyassure yourself
check/verify sth with sb
check/make sure/verify/assure yourself that…
check/verify what/whether…  
Synonyms:
check
examine inspect go over sth
These words all mean to look closely to make sure that everything is correct, in good condition, or acceptable.
checkto look at sth closely to make sure that everything is correct, in good condition, safe or satisfactory: Check your work before handing it in.
examineto look at sb/sth closely to see if there is anything wrong or to find the cause of a problem: The goods were examined for damage on arrival.
inspectto look at sb/sth closely to make sure that everything is satisfactory; to officially visit a school, factory, etc. in order to check that rules are being obeyed and that standards are acceptable: Make sure you inspect the goods before signing for them. The Tourist Board inspects all recommended hotels at least once a year.
check, examine or inspect?
All these words can be used when you are looking for possible problems, but only check is used for mistakes: Examine/Inspect your work before handing it in. Only examine is used when looking for the cause of a problem: The doctor checked/inspected her but could find nothing wrong. Examine is used more often about a professional person: The surveyor examined the walls for signs of damp. Inspect is used more often about an official: Public health officials were called in to inspect the restaurant.
go over sthto check sth carefully for mistakes, damage or anything dangerous: Go over your work for spelling mistakes before you hand it in.
to check/examine/inspect/go over (sth) for sth
to check/examine/inspect/go over sth to see if/whether…
to check/examine/inspect/go over sth carefully/thoroughly  
Example Bank:
Always check that the electricity is switched off before you start.
Check the engine oil level regularly.
Check the roof for loose slates.
He was just checking to see if I was in my room.
I checked with her to see if she needed any help.
I'll need to check these figures against last year's.
It's worth checking that there is no rust on the car.
She began mentally checking off the things on her to-do list.
The cartons were all checked off as they were unloaded.
To take advantage of this extra bonus offer, simply check the box on your order form.
We had better check that all the doors are locked.
‘Is Mary in the office?’ ‘Just a moment. I'll go and check.’
Check the oil and water in the car before setting off.
Go and check that I've locked the windows.
She made no effort to check her tears and just let them run down her face.
She wanted to tell him the whole truth but she checked herself.
The active ingredient checks the growth of bacteria.
You'd better check with Jane what time she's expecting us.
Idiom: hold something in check

Derived: check in  check into …  check on somebody  check out  check over something  check somebody off  check somebody out  check something in  check something out  check up on somebody  check up on something 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

check / tʃek / verb [ I or T ] (EXAMINE)

A2 to make certain that something or someone is correct, safe, or suitable by examining it or them quickly:

You should always check your oil, water, and tyres before taking your car on a long trip.

Customs stopped us and checked (= searched) our bags for alcohol and cigarettes.

After I'd finished the exam, I checked my answers for mistakes.

The doctor will call next week to check on your progress.

My wife checks on (= visits) our elderly neighbour every few days to make sure that he's alright.

[ + (that) ] I always check (that) I've shut the windows before I leave the house.

He double- checked all the doors (= checked them all twice) before leaving the house.

→  See also crosscheck

B1 to find out about something:

[ + question word ] I rang them yesterday to check wh en they were arriving.

[ + to infinitive ] If you're near the garage, could you check to see (= ask) if the car's ready?

If you're unsure of your legal rights, I would check with (= ask) a lawyer.
 

check / tʃek / verb [ T ] (STOP)

to stop someone from doing or saying something, or to prevent something from increasing or continuing:

They have begun to vaccinate children in an attempt to check the spread of the disease.
 

check / tʃek / verb [ T ] US (LEAVE)

to leave something with someone at a particular place, so that they can take care of it for a short time:

It was hot so we checked our coats before going round the gallery.
 

check / tʃek / verb [ I ] mainly US (AGREE)

If information checks, it agrees with other information:

Her statement checks with most of the eye-witness reports.
 

check / tʃek / verb [ I or T ] (MARK)

A1 US for tick noun (MARK)
 

check / tʃek / verb [ T ] specialized (CHESS)

in the game of chess, to put the other player's king under direct attack, so that the other player is forced to defend against the attack in their next move

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

check

/tʃek/
(checks, checking, checked)

Frequency: The word is one of the 1500 most common words in English.

1.
If you check something such as a piece of information or a document, you make sure that it is correct or satisfactory.
Check the accuracy of everything in your CV...
I think there is an age limit, but I’d have to check...
She hadn’t checked whether she had a clean ironed shirt...
He checked that he had his room key...
I shall need to check with the duty officer.
VERB: V n, V, V wh, V that, V with n
see also cross-check

Check is also a noun.
He is being constantly monitored with regular checks on his blood pressure.
...a security check.
N-COUNT: usu with supp

2.
If you check on someone or something, you make sure they are in a safe or satisfactory condition.
He decided to check on things at the warehouse.
VERB: V on n

3.
If you check something that is written on a piece of paper, you put a mark, like a V with the right side extended, next to it to show that something is correct or has been selected or dealt with. (AM; in BRIT, usually use tick)
Frequently, men who check answer (b) have not actually had the experience of being repeatedly rejected by women.
VERB: V n

4.
To check something, usually something bad, means to stop it from spreading or continuing.
Sex education is also expected to help check the spread of AIDS.
= curb
VERB: V n

5.
If you check yourself or if something checks you, you suddenly stop what you are doing or saying.
He was about to lose his temper but checked himself in time...
I held up one finger to check him.
VERB: V pron-refl, V n

6.
When you check your luggage at an airport, you give it to an official so that it can be taken on to your plane.
We arrived at the airport, checked our baggage and wandered around the gift shops...
VERB: V n

To check in your luggage means the same as to check it.
They checked in their luggage and found seats in the departure lounge.
PHRASAL VERB: V P n (not pron), also V n P

7.
The check in a restaurant is a piece of paper on which the price of your meal is written and which you are given before you pay. (mainly AM; in BRIT, use bill)
= bill
N-COUNT

8.
In a game of chess, you say check when you are attacking your opponent’s king.
CONVENTION

9.
A pattern of squares, usually of two colours, can be referred to as checks or a check.
Styles include stripes and checks.
...a red and white check dress.
N-COUNT: oft N n

10.
If something or someone is held in check or is kept in check, they are controlled and prevented from becoming too great or powerful.
Life on Earth will become unsustainable unless population growth is held in check...
PHRASE: V inflects

11.
A check is the same as a cheque. (AM)

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1check /ˈʧɛk/ verb checks; checked; check·ing
1 : to look at (something) carefully to find mistakes, problems, etc., or to make sure there is nothing wrong with it

[+ obj]

• Make sure to check your spelling.
• She checked her makeup in the mirror.
• We should check the equipment to make sure that it's working properly.
• I checked the tires for wear. [=to see if they are worn down/out]
• The guards checked my passport.

[no obj]

- + for
• Be careful to check for any mistakes.
• The border guards checked in my luggage for contraband.
- see also cross-check, double-check, spot-check
2 a : to get information by looking at something, asking about something, etc.

[+ obj]

• He checked his watch and saw that it was almost noon.
• I'll just check the map to see where we are.
• I'll check the newspaper to see when the movie starts.

[no obj]

• We were out of milk last time I checked. [=looked]
• “Do you have these shoes in a larger size?” “I don't know. Let me check.” [=take a look]
• I think the door is locked, but I'll have to check (to be sure).
- often followed by to + verb
• Did you check to see where the movie was playing?
• I checked to make sure the door was locked.
b : to look at or in (a place) in order to find or get something or someone

[+ obj]

• If you're looking for a spoon, check the top drawer.
• I checked his office but he wasn't there.

[no obj]

• If you're looking for the umbrella, check in the closet.
c [+ obj] : to find out if you have any (mail, messages, etc.)
• Did you check the mail yet today?
• She checked [=listened to] her phone messages when she got home.
• He logged on and checked [=read] his e-mail.
3 : to talk with someone in order to get approval, information, etc., about something

[no obj]

• I'll have to check with the manager before I can let you in.
Check with your doctor to find out which drugs are safe.

[+ obj]

• I'm not sure when you should arrive. I'll have to check that with my wife.
4 [+ obj]
a : to slow or stop (something or someone) from doing something
• She started to speak but then checked [=stopped] herself.
• The batter checked his swing. [=the batter started to swing and then stopped]
b hockey : to stop or hit (an opponent) in order to steal the ball or puck, defend the goal, etc.
• He was checked by the defender.
5 [+ obj] US
a : to leave (something you own) with a worker at a restaurant, hotel, etc., who keeps it in a special area or room (called a checkroom) while you are there
• I checked my hat and coat in the restaurant's checkroom.
b : to give (your bags, suitcases, etc.) to a worker so that they can be loaded onto a plane or train
• We checked our bags before boarding.
c : to take (someone's bags, suitcases, etc.) to load them onto a plane or train
• The airline checked our bags before we boarded.
- see also check in 3 (below)
6 [+ obj] US : to mark (something) with a check (✓) to show that it has been done, approved, etc.
• You should check [=(chiefly Brit) tick] each item on the list after you've completed it.
- often + off
• You should check off [=(chiefly Brit) tick off] each item on the list after you've completed it.
7 [no obj] US informal : to be proven to be true, accurate, etc. - usually used in negative statements
• Her story didn't check. [=the evidence did not support her story]
- see also check out 2 (below)
check back [phrasal verb] informal : to return to a place, person, etc., in order to try something again or to get additional information
• We are not hiring today, but check back next month.
• I'll check back with you [=talk to you again] in about a week.
check in [phrasal verb]
1 : to report to someone when you arrive at a place (such as an airport or convention) to let them know you are there
• Passengers must check in one hour before the flight leaves.
• Where do I have to check in? especially; : to arrive at and be given a room in a hotel, motel, etc.
check in [=register] at a hotel
• Guests cannot check in before 4:00 PM.
- see also check-in
2 US informal : to talk with someone in order to report or find out new information
• I'm just checking in to see how things are going.
- usually + with
• I have to go to a meeting now, but I'll check in with you later.
3 check (something) in or check in (something) : to leave or take bags, suitcases, etc., so that they can be loaded onto a plane or train
• We checked our bags in at the station.
• The airline checked in our luggage.
check into [phrasal verb] check into (something)
1 : to arrive at and be given a room in (a hotel, motel, etc.)
• We checked into a hotel.
2 : to look for information about (something) : to find out the truth about (something) by getting information
• The police are checking into [=checking on, checking up on] his activities. [=the police are investigating his activities]
• A problem like that should really be checked into carefully.
check off on [phrasal verb] check off on (something) US informal : to give official approval for (something)
• My boss will have to check off on [=authorize, approve] my decision.
check on [phrasal verb] check on (someone or something)
1 : to look at or examine (someone or something) to see if there are any problems
• The nurse checked on the patients regularly.
2 : to look for information about (someone or something) : to find out the truth about (someone or something) by getting information
• The police are checking on [=checking up on] him.
• I asked the waiter to check on [=find out what was happening with] my order.
check out [phrasal verb]
1 a : to leave and pay for your room at a hotel, motel, etc.
• We checked out (of the hotel) early.
- see also checkout
b US informal : to die
• There are still a lot of things I want to accomplish in life before I finally check out.
2 US informal
a : to be proven to be accurate, true, etc.
• I didn't believe her at first, but her story checked out.
• The description checked out when we compared it with the photograph. [=we saw that the description was accurate when we compared it with the photograph]
b check out (something) or check (something) out : to find out if (something) is true
• The police are still trying to check out [=investigate, confirm] his alibi.
3 check out (something or someone) or check (something or someone) out
a : to look at (something or someone) in order to find problems, mistakes, etc.
• We carefully checked out the car for defects.
• He had problems with his computer and asked the technician to check it out.
• He needs to get checked out by a doctor.
b informal : to look at (someone or something that is attractive or interesting)
• When she walked into the room, all the guys were checking her out.
• Just check out his new car!
• We're going to the mall to check out that new clothing store.
- often used in the phrase check it out to direct someone's attention to something
Check it out—they've got that new book in stock.
4 check out (something) or check (something) out
a : to borrow (something) from a library
• He checked out [=took out, borrowed] a book on farming.
b US : to add up the cost of the goods that someone buys in a store (such as a supermarket) and accept payment for them
• She got a job checking out groceries at the supermarket. also; : to pay for the goods that you buy in a store
• There was a long line of people waiting to check out their groceries.
• She was able to check out quickly using her debit card.
- see also checkout
check over [phrasal verb] check (something or someone) over or check over (something or someone) : to look at (something or someone) in a careful way to find problems, mistakes, etc.
checking the new cars over
• The doctors checked him over for bruises.
• Be sure to check over each item on the list for any mistakes.
• She checked herself over [=she looked at herself carefully] in the mirror before going to the party.
check through [phrasal verb] check through (something) : to look at the parts of (a group of things)
• I checked through all his letters but found nothing useful.
check up on [phrasal verb] check up on (someone or something) : to find or look for information about (someone or something) often in order to find out the truth
• My parents are always checking up on me.
• The police are checking up on his alibi.
- check·able adj
• an easily checkable fact

rip

rip [verb] (TEAR)

To pull apart; to tear or be torn violently and quickly

US /rɪp/ 
UK /rɪp/ 

جر دادن‌، (با فشار ناگهان‌) پاره‌ كردن‌

مثال: 

She excitedly ripped the parcel open .

Oxford Essential Dictionary

rip

 verb (rips, ripping, ripped )
to pull or tear something quickly and suddenly:
I ripped my shirt on a nail.
Joe ripped the letter open.

rip somebody off (informal) to cheat somebody by making them pay too much for something:
Tourists complained that they were being ripped off by local taxi drivers.
The noun is rip-off.

rip something up to tear something into small pieces:
She ripped the photo up.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

rip

I. rip1 S3 /rɪp/ BrE AmE verb (past tense and past participle ripped, present participle ripping)
[Date: 1300-1400; Origin: Probably from Flemish rippen 'to tear off roughly']
1. [intransitive and transitive] to tear something or be torn quickly and violently:
Her clothes had all been ripped.
The sails ripped under the force of the wind.
Impatiently, Sue ripped the letter open.
2. [transitive always + adverb/preposition] to remove something quickly and violently, using your hands
rip something out/off/away/down
Gilly ripped out a sheet of paper from her notebook.
The buttons had been ripped off.
3. rip something/somebody to shreds
a) to destroy something or damage it badly by tearing it in many places:
Jill’s kitten is ripping her sofa to shreds.
b) informal to strongly criticize someone, or criticize their opinions, remarks, behaviour etc:
I expected to have my argument ripped to shreds.
4. [transitive] to copy music from a CD to an ↑MP3 player or computer
5. let rip informal to speak or behave violently or emotionally:
Fran took a slow deep breath, then let rip, yelling and shouting at him.
6. let it/her rip informal to make a car, boat etc go as fast as it can:
Put your foot on the gas and let her rip!
rip something ↔ apart phrasal verb
to tear or pull something to pieces:
He was ripped apart by savage beasts in the forest.
rip somebody/something ↔ off phrasal verb informal
1. to charge someone too much money for something SYN overcharge:
The agency really ripped us off.
2. to steal something:
Somebody had come in and ripped off the TV and stereo.
3. to take words, ideas etc from someone else’s work and use them in your own work as if they were your own ideas SYN plagiarize
⇨ ↑rip-off(2)
• • •
THESAURUS
tear to damage paper or cloth by pulling it too hard, or letting it touch something sharp: She unwrapped the present carefully, trying not to tear the paper. | I tore a hole in my jacket, climbing over the fence.
rip to tear something quickly or violently: Beth excitedly ripped open the package. | Stop pulling my dress! You’ll rip it!
split to tear your trousers or shirt when you put them on, because they are too tight for you: He bent down and split his trousers. | Oh no, now I’ve split my shirt.
ladder British English if a woman ladders her ↑tights or STOCKINGS, she tears them so that a long thin line appears in them: Damn! I’ve laddered my tights!
snag to catch a piece of clothing on something rough or sharp so that it tears slightly: I snagged my shirt on a nail.
shred to deliberately destroy letters, documents etc by cutting them into thin pieces, often by using a special machine: In order to prevent fraud, it’s best to shred your bank statements. | I went through all my papers shredding things I didn’t need.
frayed torn a little along the edges – used about clothes, carpets etc that have been used a lot: He was wearing an old pair of frayed jeans. | The rug was a little frayed around the edges. | The jacket was a little frayed at the cuffs.
rip on somebody/something phrasal verb American English informal
to complain a lot about someone or something
rip through something phrasal verb
to move through a place quickly and with violent force:
A wave of bombings ripped through the capital’s business district.
rip something ↔ up phrasal verb
to tear something into pieces:
Sue ripped his photo up into tiny bits.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

rip

rip [rip rips ripped ripping] verb, noun   [rɪp]    [rɪp] 

verb (-pp-)
1. transitive, intransitive to tear sth or to become torn, often suddenly or violently
~ (sth) I ripped my jeans on the fence.
The flags had been ripped in two.
The nail ripped a hole in my jacket.
• I heard the tent rip.

~ sth + adj. She ripped the letter open.

2. transitive ~ sth + adv./prep. to remove sth quickly or violently, often by pulling it
He ripped off his tie.
• The carpet had been ripped from the stairs.

• Half of the house was ripped away in the explosion.

 

3. transitive ~ sth (computing) to copy sound or video files from a website or CD on to a computer

4. (computing) =  rasterize 
more at tear/rip the heart out of sth at  heart, tear/rip sb limb from limb at  limb 
 
Word Origin:
v. and n. sense 1 late Middle English reap
n. sense 2 late 18th cent. rip
 
Example Bank:
A huge fire ripped through the factory.
He ripped open the plastic bag.
I ripped my coat on a nail.
The dog had ripped a cushion to shreds.
The hounds fell on the fox and ripped it apart.
He ripped up the letter.
She'll rip you to pieces if you try to keep her cub from her.
The flag had been ripped in two
countries ripped apart by fighting
Idioms: let rip  let something rip  rip somebody to to bits

Derived: rip at something  rip into somebody  rip somebody off  rip something off  rip something up 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

rip / rɪp / verb ( -pp- ) (TEAR)

B2 [ I or T ] to pull apart; to tear or be torn violently and quickly:

His new trousers ripped when he bent down.

I ripped my shirt on a nail.

[ + obj + adj ] She excitedly ripped the parcel open .

The wind ripped the flag to/into shreds (= into little pieces) .

C1 [ T + adv/prep ] to remove something quickly, without being careful:

I wish the old fireplaces hadn't been ripped out .

We ripped up the carpets and laid a new wooden floor.
 

rip / rɪp / verb [ T ] ( -pp- ) (COPY)

to copy pictures or sounds from a CD or DVD onto a computer:

How do I rip a DVD movie to my hard drive?

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

rip

/rɪp/
(rips, ripping, ripped)

1.
When something rips or when you rip it, you tear it forcefully with your hands or with a tool such as a knife.
I felt the banner rip as we were pushed in opposite directions...
I tried not to rip the paper as I unwrapped it.
= tear
VERB: V, V n

2.
A rip is a long cut or split in something made of cloth or paper.
Looking at the rip in her new dress, she flew into a rage.
= tear
N-COUNT

3.
If you rip something away, you remove it quickly and forcefully.
He ripped away a wire that led to the alarm button...
He ripped the phone from her hand.
= tear
VERB: V n with adv, V n prep

4.
If something rips into someone or something or rips through them, it enters that person or thing so quickly and forcefully that it often goes completely through them.
A volley of bullets ripped into the facing wall...
= tear
VERB: V prep/adv

5.
If you let rip, you do something forcefully and without trying to control yourself. (INFORMAL)
Turn the guitars up full and let rip...
PHRASE: let inflects

6.
If you let something rip, you do it as quickly or as forcefully as possible. You can say ‘let it rip’ or ‘let her rip’ to someone when you want them to make a vehicle go as fast as it possibly can.
The ecological disaster is partly a product of letting everything rip in order to increase production.
PHRASE: let inflects
 

rip off

If someone rips you off, they cheat you by charging you too much money for something or by selling you something that is broken or damaged. (INFORMAL)
The Consumer Federation claims banks are ripping you off by not passing along savings on interest rates...
The airlines have been accused of ripping off customers.

PHRASAL VERB: V n P, V P n (not pron)

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1rip /ˈrɪp/ verb rips; ripped; rip·ping
1 a [+ obj] : to tear, split, or open (something) quickly or violently
• She ripped the fabric in half.
• He ripped open the package.
• The dog ripped the pillow to shreds/pieces.
• The dog ripped a hole [=made a hole] in the pillow.
• The force of the explosion ripped a hole in the wall.
b [no obj] : to become torn or split
• Her coat ripped when it caught on the doorknob.
• The seam has ripped.
2 always followed by an adverb or preposition [+ obj] : to remove (something) quickly or violently
• I ripped the poster off the wall.
• The sink had been ripped from the wall.
• He ripped the page out of the magazine.
• She ripped off her mask.
• He ripped the letter from my hands.
3 [no obj] : to go or move very quickly through or into something
• The fire ripped through the forest.
• an epidemic that ripped through the region
• The bullet ripped into her leg.
4 [+ obj] : to criticize (someone or something) in a very harsh or angry way
• (US) The coach ripped [=ripped into] his team for their sloppy play.
• His latest movie was ripped to shreds/pieces by the critics.
let rip informal
1 : to do something in a way that is full of anger or energy
• For the concert finale, the band let rip with a fantastic version of the song that made them famous.
• I don't think anyone expected the senator to let rip at the press conference like that. [=to speak in such an angry way]
2 let (something) rip : to make (a car, boat, machine, etc.) go very fast - usually used in phrases like let it rip and let her/'er rip
• Once we got the boat out into the open water, we let it rip.
rip apart [phrasal verb]
1 rip (something) apart or rip apart (something) : to completely destroy (something) by tearing it into pieces
• The child ripped the toy apart.
• Strong winds had ripped apart many of the little beach bungalows.
- often used figuratively
• a tragedy/scandal that almost ripped the family apart
2 rip (someone or something) apart or rip apart (someone or something) : to criticize (someone or something) in a very harsh or angry way especially by describing weaknesses, flaws, etc.
• Critics ripped the author's latest novel apart.
• an article that rips apart the mayor's plan
rip into [phrasal verb] rip into (someone or something) : to criticize (someone or something) in a very harsh or angry way
• The coach ripped into [=tore into] the team after the game.
• She ripped into the band's last performance.
rip off [phrasal verb] informal
1 rip (someone) off or rip off (someone) : to steal from or cheat (someone)
• Hundreds of people were ripped off in a scam involving two people who claimed to be collecting money for disaster victims.
• The store had been ripping customers off for years.
• I wasn't trying to rip you off. I thought $50 was a fair price.
2 rip (something) off or rip off (something)
a : to steal (something)
• The organization's treasurer ripped off almost $6,000 before being caught.
• Somebody ripped off [=stole] all our equipment. = All our equipment got ripped off. [=stolen]
b disapproving : to copy or imitate (something) improperly : to make something that is too much like (something made by someone else)
• The film has done well, but its makers have been accused of ripping off another movie made 30 years ago.
- see also rip-off
rip up [phrasal verb] rip (something) up or rip up (something) : to completely destroy (something) by tearing it into pieces
• He ripped up the letter.

rerun

rerun [verb]

To show a television programme, film, etc. again

US /ˌriːˈrʌn/ 
UK /ˌriːˈrʌn/ 

 

دوباره نشان دادن (فیلم)

مثال: 

The James Bond films are always being rerun on television.

فیلم های جیمز باند همیشه در تلویزیون مجدداً پخش می شود.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

II. rerun2 /riːˈrʌn/ BrE AmE verb (past tense reran /-ˈræn/, past participle rerun, present participle rerunning) [transitive]
[Word Family: noun: ↑run, ↑rerun, ↑runner, ↑running, ↑overrun; verb: ↑run, ↑outrun, ↑overrun, ↑rerun; adjective: ↑running, ↑runny; adverb: ↑running]
1. to show a film or television programme again on television SYN repeat
2. to do something in the same way as before SYN repeat
3. to arrange for a race or competition to be held again SYN repeat

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

verb   [ˌriːˈrʌn]  ;   [ˌriːˈrʌn]  (re·run·ning, reran   [ˌriːˈræn]  ;   [ˌriːˈræn]  rerun)

1. ~ sth to show a film/movie, television programme, etc. again

2. ~ sth to do sth again in a similar way

to rerun an experiment

3. ~ sth to run a race again

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

rerun / ˌriːˈrʌn / verb [ T ] ( present participle rerunning , past tense reran , past participle rerun )

to show a television programme, film, etc. again:

The James Bond films are always being rerun on television.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

rerun

2re·run /riˈrʌn/ verb -runs; -ran /-ˈræn/ ; -run; -run·ning [+ obj]
1 : to show (a television program or movie) again
• Last week's show is being rerun tomorrow night.
2 : to do or run (something) again
• They reran the race, but the result was the same.
• He reran the software on my computer.
• They reran [=repeated] the lab tests.

mail

mail verb]

mainly US (mainly UK post

to send a letter or parcel or to email something

US /meɪl/ 
UK /meɪl/ 

پست‌ كردن‌، با پست‌ فرستادن‌

مثال: 

I mailed her a birthday card.

يك‌ كارت‌ تولد برايش‌ پست‌ كردم‌.‏

Oxford Essential Dictionary

>> mail verb (mails, mailing, mailed ) (American) to send something in the mail:
I'll mail the money to you.

 

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

II. mail2 S3 BrE AmE verb [transitive] especially American English
1. to send a letter or package to someone SYN post British English
mail something to somebody
The weekly newsletter is mailed to women all over the country.
2. to send a document to someone using a computer SYN email
mail something to somebody
Can you mail it to me as an attachment?
mail something ↔ out phrasal verb
to send letters, packages etc to a lot of people at the same time SYN send out:
The department has just mailed out 300,000 notices.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

verb
1. (especially NAmE) to send sth to sb using the postal system
~ sth (to sb/sth) Don't forget to mail that letter to your mother.
~ sb sth Don't forget to mail your mother that letter.

~ sb/sth The company intends to mail 50 000 households in the area.

2. (BrE) to send a message to sb by email
~ sb Please mail us at the following email address.
~ sth (to sb/sth) The virus mails itself forward to everyone in your address book.
~ sb sth Can you mail me that document you mentioned?
Verb forms:

 
Word Origin:
Middle English (in the sense ‘travelling bag’): from Old French male ‘wallet’, of West Germanic origin. The sense “by post” dates from the mid 17th cent.  
Thesaurus:
mail verb T (especially AmE)
Don't forget to mail that letter.
sendforwardsend sth on|BrE post|formal, especially business dispatch
mail/send/forward/send sth on/post/dispatch sth to sb
mail/send/forward/send on/post/dispatch a letter
mail/send/post a/an invitation/package/parcel/postcard/reply  
British/American:
post / mail
Nouns
In BrE the official system used for sending and delivering letters, parcels/packages, etc. is usually called the post. In NAmE it is usually called the mail: I’ll put an application form in the post/mail for you today. Send your fee by post/mail to this address. Mail is sometimes used in BrE in such expressions as the Royal Mail. Post occurs in NAmE in such expressions as the US Postal Service.
In BrE post is also used to mean the letters, parcels/packages, etc. that are delivered to you. Mail is the usual word in NAmE and is sometimes also used in BrE: Was there any post/mail this morning? I sat down to open my post/mail. Verbs
Compare: I’ll post the letter when I go out. (BrE) and I’ll mail the letter when I go out. (NAmE)Compounds
Note these words: postman (BrE), mailman/mail carrier (both NAmE); postbox (BrE), mailbox (NAmE) Some compounds are used in both BrE and NAmE: post office, postcard, mail order. 
Example Bank:
Mailing out information can be very expensive.
• The brochures are mailed direct to members.

• Don't forget to mail that letter.

 

See also: post

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

mail / meɪl / verb [ T ] mainly US ( mainly UK post )

to send a letter or parcel or to email something:

She mailed it last week but it still hasn't arrived.

[ + two objects ] I promised to mail him the article/mail the article to him.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

mail

[me͟ɪl]
 
 mails, mailing, mailed
 1) N-SING: the N, also by N The mail is the public service or system by which letters and parcels are collected and delivered.
  Your check is in the mail...
  People had to renew their motor vehicle registrations through the mail...
  The firm has offices in several large cities, but does most of its business by mail.
  Syn:
  post
 2) N-UNCOUNT: also the N You can refer to letters and parcels that are delivered to you as mail.
  There was no mail except the usual junk addressed to the occupier...
  Nora looked through the mail.
  Syn:
  post
 3) VERB If you mail a letter or parcel to someone, you send it to them by putting it in a post box or taking it to a post office. [mainly AM]
  [V n to n] Last year, he mailed the documents to French journalists...
  [V n n] He mailed me the contract...
  [V n with n] The Government has already mailed some 18 million households with details of the public offer. [Also V n](in BRIT, usually use post)
 4) VERB To mail a message to someone means to send it to them by means of electronic mail or a computer network.
  [be V-ed prep] ...if a report must be electronically mailed to an office by 9 am the next day. [Also V n]
 N-UNCOUNT
 Mail is also a noun. If you have any problems then send me some mail.
 5) → See also mailing, chain mail, e-mail, electronic mail, hate mail, junk mail, surface mail
  Phrasal Verbs:
  - mail out

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

2mail verb mails; mailed; mail·ing [+ obj] chiefly US : to send (something, such as a letter or package) by mail
• Have you mailed (out) the invitations yet? [=(chiefly Brit) have you posted the invitations yet?]
• She mailed me a copy of her manuscript. = She mailed a copy of her manuscript to me.

 

post

post [verb] (LETTERS)

UK (US mail) to send a letter or parcel by post

US /poʊst/ 
UK /pəʊst/ 

پست کردن، ارسال، فرستادن

مثال: 

My ​husband ​generally posts ​our ​letters on his way to ​work.

همسر من معمولا نامه های در راهش به سر کار پست می کند.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

post

 verb (posts, posting, posted)

1 (British) (American mail) to send a letter or package by post:
Could you post this letter for me?

2 to send somebody to a place to do a job:
Sara's company have posted her to Japan for two years.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

II. post2 S3 BrE AmE verb [transitive]
[Word Family: noun: ↑post, ↑postage, ↑postie, ↑posting; verb: ↑post; adjective: ↑postal]
1. LETTER British English to send a letter, package etc by post SYN mail:
She’s just gone to post a letter.
post something (off) to somebody
Did you remember to post the card to my parents?
post somebody something
I posted Barry the cheque last Friday.
2. post something through sb’s door/letterbox British English to push something through someone’s ↑letterbox:
I’ll post the key through your letterbox when I leave.
3. JOB [usually passive] if you are posted somewhere, your employer sends you to work there, usually for several years
post somebody to France/London etc
He joined the British Army and was posted to Germany.
post somebody abroad/overseas
4. PUBLIC NOTICE (also post up) to put up a public notice about something on a wall or notice board:
The exam results were posted on the bulletin board yesterday.
5. GUARD to make someone be in a particular place in order to guard a building, check who enters or leaves a place, watch something etc SYN station:
Guards were to be posted around nuclear power stations.
6. keep somebody posted spoken to regularly tell someone the most recent news about something
keep somebody posted on
I’ll keep you posted on his progress.
7. PROFIT/LOSS ETC especially American English to officially record and announce information about a company’s financial situation or a country’s economic situation:
Cisco Systems posted record profits and sales for the third fiscal quarter.
8. INTERNET MESSAGE to put a message or computer document on the Internet so that other people can see it:
Could you post those new flyers on David’s website?
9. be posted missing British English if a soldier is posted missing, it is announced officially that they have disappeared
10. post bail law especially American English to pay a specific amount of money in order to be allowed to leave prison before your ↑trial

 

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

verb  

LETTERS
1. (BrE) (NAmE mail) transitive to send a letter, etc. to sb by post/mail
~ sth (off) (to sb) Have you posted off your order yet?
Is it OK if I post the cheque to you next week?
~ sb sth Is it OK if I post you the cheque next week?

compare  mail

2. (BrE) (NAmE mail) transitive ~ sth to put a letter, etc. into a postbox

• Could you post this letter for me?  

STH THROUGH HOLE

3. transitive ~ sth + adv./prep. to put sth through a hole into a container

• Let yourself out and post the keys through the letter box.  

SB FOR JOB

4. transitive, usually passive ~ sb + adv./prep. to send sb to a place for a period of time as part of their job
• She's been posted to Washington for two years.

• Most of our employees get posted abroad at some stage.  

SOLDIER/GUARD

5. transitive ~ sb + adv./prep. to put sb, especially a soldier, in a particular place so that they can guard a building or area
• Guards have been posted along the border.

• A police officer was posted outside the door to make sure the suspect didn't leave the building.  

PUBLIC NOTICE
6. transitive, often passive ~ sth + adv./prep. to put a notice, etc. in a public place so that people can see it
Syn:  display

• A copy of the letter was posted on the noticeboard.  

GIVE INFORMATION

7. transitive (especially NAmE) to announce sth publicly or officially, especially financial information or a warning
~ sth The company posted a $1.1 billion loss.
• A snow warning was posted for Ohio.

~ sb/sth + adj. The aircraft and its crew were posted missing.

8. transitive, intransitive to put information or pictures on a website
~ sth (on sth) The results will be posted on the Internet.
~ (on sth) The photos have been provided by fans who post on the message board.

• I've been posting now and again at ‘British Moneymaker’.  

PAY MONEY TO COURT
9. transitive ~ bail/(a) bond (especially NAmE) to pay money to a court so that a person accused of a crime can go free until their trial
She was released after posting $100 cash bond and her driver's license.
Verb forms:

Word Origin:
n. senses 6 to 8 and v. senses 6 to 7 Old English Latin postis ‘doorpost’ ‘rod, beam’ Middle English Old French post ‘pillar, beam’ Middle Dutch Middle Low German post ‘doorpost’
n. senses 1 to 3 and v. senses 1 to 3
early 16th cent. French poste Italian posta Latin posita ponere ‘to place’
n. senses 4 to 5 and v. senses 4 to 5 mid 16th cent. French poste Italian posto popular Latin positum ponere ‘to place’
 
Thesaurus:
post verb T (BrE)
Could you post this letter for me?
sendforward|especially AmE mail|formal, especially business dispatch
post/send/forward/mail/dispatch sth to sb
post/send/forward/mail/dispatch a letter/document
post/send/mail a/an invitation/package/parcel/postcard/reply  
Example Bank:
Balden was later posted to Luqa as station commander.
I should get this letter posted off this afternoon.
I'll post the information to you.
I'm hoping to be posted abroad.
A police officer was posted outside the door to make sure the suspect didn't leave the building.
• Most employees get posted abroad at some stage.

• She's been posted to Washington for two years.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

post / pəʊst /   / poʊst / verb [ T ] (LETTERS)

A2 UK ( US mail ) to send a letter or parcel by post:

Did you remember to post my letter?

I must post that parcel (off) or she won't get it in time for her birthday.

[ + two objects ] Could you post me the details/post the details to me?

UK to put an object through a letterbox (= special opening in a door) :

Just post the key through the door after you've locked it.

 

post / pəʊst /   / poʊst / verb [ T ] (PLACE)

C2 to send someone to a particular place to work:

He's been posted to Pakistan for six months.

Guards were posted at all the doors.
 

post / pəʊst /   / poʊst / verb [ T ] (MESSAGE)

to stick or pin a notice on a wall in order to make it publicly known:

Company announcements are usually posted (up) on the noticeboard.

B1 to leave an electronic message on a website:

Somebody's been posting obscene messages in this chat room.

 

post / pəʊst /   / poʊst / verb [ T ] US (PAY)

to pay money, especially so that a person who has been accused of committing a crime can be free until their trial:

She has agreed to post bail for her brother.

 

post / pəʊst /   / poʊst / verb [ T ] (RESULTS)

to announce a company's financial results:

The oil company posted profits of $25.1 billion.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

post

I [po͟ʊst]LETTERS, PARCELS, AND INFORMATION
 

 posts, posting, posted
 1) N-SING: the N, also by N The post is the public service or system by which letters and packages are collected and delivered. [mainly BRIT]
  You'll receive your book through the post...
  The winner will be notified by post...
  The cheque is in the post.
  Syn:
  mail(in AM, usually use mail)
 2) N-UNCOUNT You can use post to refer to letters and packages that are delivered to you. [mainly BRIT]
  He flipped through the post without opening any of it...
  There has been no post in three weeks.
  Syn:
  mail(in AM, usually use mail)
 3) N-UNCOUNT: supp N Post is used to refer to an occasion when letters or packages are delivered. For example, first post on a particular day is the first time that things are delivered. [mainly BRIT]
  Entries must arrive by first post next Wednesday...
  They just have to wait patiently for the next post.
  Syn:
  delivery
 4) VERB If you post a letter or package, you send it to someone by putting it in a post box or by taking it to a post office. [mainly BRIT]
  [V n] If I write a letter, would you post it for me?...
  [V n n] I'm posting you a cheque tonight...
  [V n to n] I posted a letter to Stanley saying I was an old Army friend.
  Syn:
  mail
 PHRASAL VERB
 Post off means the same as post. V n P He'd left me to pack up the mail and post it off... V P n (not pron) All you do is complete and post off a form. (in AM, usually use mail)
 5) VERB If you post notices, signs, or other pieces of information somewhere, you fix them to a wall or board so that everyone can see them.
  [V n] Officials began posting warning notices...
  [V n prep/adv] She has posted photographs on bulletin boards.
 PHRASAL VERB
 Post up means the same as post. V n P He has posted a sign up that says `No Fishing'... Also V n P prep/adv V P n (not pron) We post up a set of rules for the house.
 6) VERB If you post information on the Internet, you make the information available to other people on the Internet.
  [be V-ed] A consultation paper has been posted on the Internet inviting input from Net users.
 7) PHRASE: keep inflects, oft PHR on/with n If you keep someone posted, you keep giving them the latest information about a situation that they are interested in.
  Keep me posted on your progress.II [po͟ʊst]JOBS AND PLACES
 ♦♦

 posts, posting, posted
 1) N-COUNT: usu with supp, oft N of/as n A post in a company or organization is a job or official position in it, usually one that involves responsibility. [FORMAL]
  She had earlier resigned her post as President Menem's assistant...
  Sir Peter has held several senior military posts.
  Syn:
  position
 2) VERB: usu passive If you are posted somewhere, you are sent there by the organization that you work for and usually work there for several years.
  [be V-ed prep/adv] After training she was posted to Brixton...
  [be V-ed prep/adv] It is normal to spend two or three years working in this country before being posted overseas.
 3) N-COUNT: usu poss N You can use post to refer to the place where a soldier, guard, or other person has been told to remain and to do his or her job.
  Quick men, back to your post!
  Syn:
  station, position
 4) VERB If a soldier, guard, or other person is posted somewhere, they are told to stand there, in order to supervise an activity or guard a place.
  [be V-ed prep/adv] Police have now been posted outside all temples...
  [V n prep/adv] British Rail had to post a signalman at the entrance to the tunnel...
  [V-ed] We have guards posted near the windows. [Also be V-ed]
  Syn:
  position
 5) → See also posting, staging postIII [po͟ʊst]POLES
 posts
 (Please look at category 4 to see if the expression you are looking for is shown under another headword.)
 1) N-COUNT A post is a strong upright pole made of wood or metal that is fixed into the ground.
  You have to get eight wooden posts, and drive them into the ground...
  The device is fixed to a post.
  Syn:
  pole
 2) N-COUNT A post is the same as a goalpost.
  Wimbledon were unlucky not to win after hitting the post twice.
  Syn:
  goalpost
 3) N-SING: the N On a horse-racing track, the post is a pole which marks the finishing point.
 4) → See also first-past-the-post
 to pip someone at the postsee pip

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

post
5post verb posts; posted; post·ing [+ obj]
1 always followed by an adverb or preposition : to assign (someone, such as a guard) to stand or stay at a particular place
• Paramedics were posted nearby.
• The general posted a guard outside the door to his tent.
2 chiefly Brit : to send (someone) to a place to work for a long period of time as part of a job - usually + to
• Her company is posting her to New York City.
- usually used as (be) posted
• He was posted to Munich, Germany.

- compare 2post

2post verb posts; post·ed; post·ing
1 [+ obj]
a : to put up (a sign, notice, etc.) so that it can be seen by many people
• When we lost our cat, we posted (up) signs all over the neighborhood asking if people had seen him.
• The professor posted (up) the students' exam grades outside her office.
b : to make (something) officially known to many people
• A snowstorm warning was posted [=announced] for the New England area.
• The company posted [=reported] increased profits for the third quarter.
2 : to add (a message) to an online message board

[+ obj]

• I read through the previous messages, then posted a quick response.

[no obj]

• She posts regularly to several newsgroups.
3 [+ obj] chiefly Brit : to send (a letter or package) by mail
• If you find anything I've left behind, just post [=mail] it to me.
keep (someone) posted : to regularly give (someone) the most recent news about something
Keep me posted on how the project is coming along.
• We don't know her condition yet, but we'll keep you posted.
post bail
- see 1bail

- compare 5post

 

comment

comment [verb]

to make a comment

US /ˈkɑː.ment/ 
UK /ˈkɒm.ent/ 

اظهار نظر كردن‌، نظر دادن‌

مثال: 

My ​mum always comments on what I'm ​wearing.

مادر من همیشه نسبت به چیزی که می پوشم نظر می دهد.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

comment

 verb (comments, commenting, commented)
to say what you think about something:
A lot of people at school commented on my new watch.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

II. comment2 S3 W3 AC BrE AmE verb [intransitive and transitive]
[Word Family: noun: ↑comment, ↑commentary; verb: ↑comment]
to express an opinion about someone or something SYN remark
comment on
People were always commenting on his size.
comment that
Smith’s lawyer commented that the decision was ‘outrageous’.
• • •
THESAURUS
■ to say something
say to tell someone something, using words: ‘I really ought to go,’ she said. | Lauren said she’d probably be late.
state to say something, especially in a definite or formal way – used in official contexts: The witness stated that he had never seen the woman before. | Please state your name and address.
announce to publicly tell people about something: The chairman announced his resignation. | The results will be announced tomorrow. | We will announce the winners next Sunday. | They were announcing the train times over the loudspeaker system.
declare to say something very firmly: ‘My personal life is none of your business,’ she declared.
mention to talk about someone or something, especially without giving many details: Did Tom mention anything about what happened at school? | Your name was mentioned!
express to let someone know your feelings by putting them into words: Young children often find it difficult to express their emotions.
comment to say what your opinion is about someone or something: The prime minister was asked to comment on the crisis.
note/remark formal to say that you have noticed that something is true – used especially in formal writing: We have already noted that most old people live alone. | Someone once remarked that the problem with computers is that they only give you answers.
add to say something more, after what has already been said: He added that he thought it could be done fairly cheaply.
point out to mention something that seems particularly important or relevant: Dr Graham points out that most children show some signs of abnormal behaviour. | It’s worth pointing out that few people actually die of this disease.
air to talk about your opinions, worries, or the things you disagree about: air your views/grievances/differences: The programme will give listeners the chance to air their views about immigration. | Workers were able to air their grievances.
voice to talk publicly about your feelings or about whether you approve or disapprove of something formal: voice concern/support/doubt/fears etc: The president has already voiced his support for the proposal. | She voiced concern for the safety of the hostages.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

verb intransitive, transitive ~ (on/upon sth)
to express an opinion about sth
I don't feel I can comment on their decision.
He refused to comment until after the trial.
We were just commenting on how well you look.
~ that… A spokesperson commented that levels of carbon dioxide were very high.
+ speech ‘Not his best performance,’ she commented to the woman sitting next to her.
Verb forms:

 
Word Origin:
late Middle English (in the sense ‘explanatory piece of writing’): from Latin commentum ‘contrivance’ (in late Latin also ‘interpretation’), neuter past participle of comminisci ‘devise’.  
Thesaurus:
comment verb I, T
They commented on how well she looked.
remark|formal observenote
comment/remark on sth
comment/remark/observe to sb
comment/remark/observe/note that…
Comment, remark or observe? You can only use refuse to with comment:
He refused to comment until after the trial.
 ¤ He refused to remark/observe until after the trial.  
Synonyms:
comment
note remark observe
These words all mean to say or write a fact or opinion.
commentto express an opinion or give facts about sth: He refused to comment until after the trial.
note(rather formal) to mention sth because it is important or interesting: He noted in passing that the company's record on safety issues was not good.
remarkto say or write what you have noticed about a situation: Critics remarked that the play was not original.
observe(formal) to say or write what you have noticed about a situation: She observed that it was getting late.
comment, remark or observe?
If you comment on sth you say sth about it; if you remark on sth or observe sth, you say sth about it that you have noticed: there is often not much difference between the three. However, while you can refuse to comment (without on), you cannot ‘refuse to remark’ or ‘refuse to observe’ (without on): He refused to remark/observe until after the trial.
to comment/note/remark/observe that…
to comment on/note/remark/observe how…
to comment/remark on sth
to comment/remark/observe to sb
‘It's long,’ he commented/noted/remarked/observed. 
Example Bank:
He commented favourably on the proposals.
He refused to comment on the proposals.
• People were commenting about her abilities.

• She commented to me that she liked it.

 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

comment / ˈkɒm.ent /   / ˈkɑː.ment / verb [ I or T ]

B2 to make a comment:

My mum always comments on what I'm wearing.

[ + that ] He commented that the two essays were rather similar.

The official refused to/declined to comment on the matter.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

comment

[kɒ̱ment]
 
 comments, commenting, commented
 1) VERB If you comment on something, you give your opinion about it or you give an explanation for it.
  [V on n/wh] So far, Mr Cook has not commented on these reports...
  [V on n/wh] Stratford police refuse to comment on whether anyone has been arrested...
  You really can't comment till you know the facts...
  [V with quote] `I'm always happy with new developments,' he commented...
  [V that] Stuart commented that this was very true.
 2) N-VAR A comment is something that you say which expresses your opinion of something or which gives an explanation of it.
  He made his comments at a news conference in Amsterdam...
  I was wondering whether you had any comments about that?...
  There's been no comment so far from police about the allegations...
  Lady Thatcher, who is abroad, was not available for comment.
 3) N-SING: usu a N on n If an event or situation is a comment on something, it reveals something about that thing, usually something bad.
  He argues that family problems are typically a comment on some unresolved issues in the family.
  Syn:
  reflection
 4) CONVENTION People say `no comment' as a way of refusing to answer a question, usually when it is asked by a journalist.
  No comment. I don't know anything.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

comment

2comment verb -ments; -ment·ed; -ment·ing : to make a statement about someone or something : to make a comment

[no obj]

• When asked about his involvement in the scandal, he refused/declined to comment.
- usually + on
• Several people have commented on my new dress.
• He declined to comment on the matter.

[+ obj]

• She commented that the service seemed slow.
• “The service seems slow today,” she commented. [=remarked]

bring

bring [verb] (TOWARDS PLACE)

to take or carry someone or something to a place or a person, or in the direction of the person speaking

US /brɪŋ/ 
UK /brɪŋ/ 

آوردن

مثال: 

Come and bring the book too.

بيا و كتاب‌ را هم‌ بياور.‏

Oxford Essential Dictionary

bring

 verb (brings, bringing, brought /, has brought)

1 to take something or somebody with you to a place:
Could you bring me a glass of water?
Can I bring a friend to the party?

2 to make something happen:
Money doesn't always bring happiness.

bring something back

1 to return something:
I've brought back the book you lent me.

2 to make you remember something:
These old photographs bring back a lot of happy memories.

bring somebody up to look after a child until they are grown up:
He was brought up by his aunt after his parents died.

bring something up

1 to be sick, so that food comes up from your stomach and out of your mouth

2 to start to talk about something:
Can you bring up this problem at the next meeting?

which word?
Bring, take or fetch? You bring something with you to the place where you are going: Bring your holiday photos to show me.He always brings me flowers.Can I bring a friend to the party? You take something to a different place: Don't forget to take your passport.Take an umbrella when you go out today. You go somewhere to fetch someone or something and bring them back: I'm going to fetch Sally from the airport.I'll fetch you a drink from the kitchen.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

bring

bring S1 W1 /brɪŋ/ BrE AmE verb (past tense and past participle brought /brɔːt $ brɒːt/) [transitive]
[Language: Old English; Origin: bringan]
1.
a) to take something or someone with you to the place where you are now, or to the place you are talking about ⇨ take:
Did you bring an umbrella?
It was the first time Joey had ever brought a girl home.
They brought news of further fighting along the border.
bring somebody/something to somebody/something
Is it OK if I bring some friends to the party?
bring somebody/something with you
For some reason, Jesse had brought a tape recorder with him.
b) to get something for someone and take it to them
bring somebody something
Can you bring me another beer?
Robert asked the waiter to bring him the check.
While she was in prison, friends used to bring her books.
bring somebody/something to somebody/something
He expects me to bring everything to him.
2.
a) to make a particular situation exist, or cause a particular feeling:
efforts to bring peace to the region
The strikes are expected to bring chaos.
The senator’s speech brought an angry response from Civil Rights groups.
b) to cause someone or something to reach a particular state or condition
bring something to an end/a close/a halt/a conclusion (=make something stop)
The trial was swiftly brought to an end.
It was the war that first brought him to power (=made him have power over a country).
So far the US has been unable to bring him to justice (=make him be punished for his actions).
Bring the sauce to the boil (=heat it until it boils).
The country had been brought to its knees (=caused to be in such a bad condition that it is almost impossible to continue).
3. [always + adverb/preposition] to make something move in a particular direction
bring something up/down/round etc
Bring your arm up slowly until it’s level with your shoulder.
The storm brought the old oak tree crashing down.
4. [always + adverb/preposition] if something brings people to a place, it makes them go there:
The discovery of gold brought thousands of people to the Transvaal.
what brings you here? (=used to ask why someone is in a particular place)
What brings you here on a night like this?
5. to make something available for people to use, have, enjoy etc:
The expansion of state education brought new and wider opportunities for working class children.
bring something to somebody/something
The government is launching a new initiative to bring jobs to deprived areas.
bring somebody something
It’s a good sign – let’s hope it will bring us some luck.
6. if a period of time brings a particular event or situation, the event or situation happens during that time:
The 1930s brought unemployment and economic recession.
Who knows what the future will bring?
7. bring charges/a lawsuit/a court case/a prosecution/a claim (against somebody) to begin a court case in order to try to prove that someone has done something wrong or is legally responsible for something wrong:
Survivors of the fire later brought a billion-dollar lawsuit against the company.
The police say they are planning to bring charges against him.
8. bring a smile to sb’s lips/face to make someone smile:
Her words brought a sudden smile to his lips.
9. bring tears to sb’s eyes to make someone start to cry:
The pain brought tears to his eyes.
10. bring the total/number/score etc to something used when saying what the new total etc is:
This brings the total to 46.
11. cannot/could not bring yourself to do something to feel unable to do something because it would upset you or someone else too much:
She still can’t bring herself to talk about it.
12. spoken used when saying that something is the next thing that you want to talk about
that/this/which brings me to ...
This brings me to the main point of today’s meeting.
13. if a programme is brought to you by a particular television or radio company, they broadcast it or make it
something is brought to you by somebody
This programme is brought to you by the BBC.
14. bring something to bear (on/upon something) formal to use something, for example your power, authority, or your knowledge, in a way that will have a big effect on something or someone:
The full force of the law was brought to bear on anyone who criticized the government.
15. bring home the bacon informal to earn the money that your family needs to live

COLLOCATIONS (for Meaning 2)
■ nouns
bring peace/war The treaty brought peace to both England and France.
bring chaos A bomb scare brought chaos to the town centre yesterday.
bring somebody pleasure/joy/pain/grief etc The decision brought him great relief.
■ phrases
bring something to an end/halt (=especially something bad) It is our resonsibility to discuss how this conflict can be brought to an end.
bring something to a close (=especially a meeting) At last the meeting was brought to a close.
bring something to a conclusion (=used especially in law) Juvenile cases need to be brought to a conclusion quickly.
bring somebody to power (=make someone have power over a country) The revolution brought to power a communist government.
bring somebody to justice (=catch and punish someone for their actions) The authorities swore that the killers would be brought to justice.
bring somebody into contact with somebody/something The people of the island were suddenly brought into contact with the outside world.
bring something/somebody to their knees (=make it almost impossible for somebody/something to continue) A severe drought brought the country to its knees.

THESAURUS
bring to take something or someone to the place where you are now, or the place where you are going: Have you brought your ticket with you? | He asked his father if he could bring a friend to stay.
take to move something to another place, or help someone go to another place: I took a book with me to read on the train. | He was taken to hospital by ambulance.
get (also fetch especially British English) to go to another place and come back with something or someone: I went upstairs to get my jacket. | Joseph told me to fetch the doctor, so I ran to the village.
bring something ↔ about phrasal verb
to make something happen SYN cause:
How can we bring about a change in attitudes?
A huge amount of environmental damage has been brought about by the destruction of the rain forests.
bring somebody/something ↔ along phrasal verb
to take someone or something with you when you go somewhere:
You’re welcome to bring along a friend.
I’ve brought some pictures along to show you.
bring somebody/something around/round phrasal verb
1. bring the conversation around/round to something to deliberately and gradually introduce a new subject into a conversation:
I’ll try to bring the conversation around to the subject of money.
2. to make someone become conscious again:
I slapped his face a couple of times to try to bring him round.
3. to manage to persuade someone to do something or to agree with you:
She won’t listen to me. Let’s see if Sue can bring her round.
bring somebody/something around/round to
I’m sure I can bring him around to our point of view.
4. to bring someone or something to someone’s house:
I’ll bring the books around tomorrow.
bring back phrasal verb
1. bring something ↔ back to start to use something again that was used in the past SYN reintroduce:
The city council has decided to bring back the old electric trams.
Bringing back the death penalty has done absolutely nothing to reduce crime.
2. bring something ↔ back to make you remember something:
The trip brought back a lot of happy memories.
Seeing those pictures on TV brought it all back to me.
3. bring something ↔ back to take something or someone with you when you come back from somewhere
bring something back for somebody
Don’t forget to bring something back for the kids.
bring somebody back something
If you’re going to the store, could you bring me back a six-pack?
4. bring somebody ↔ back to return someone to their previous job or position of authority SYN reinstate:
Following their latest defeat, soccer fans are urging the club to bring back the former manager.
5. bring somebody back to something if something that is said brings you back to a particular subject, it is connected with that subject, so you will start talking about it again:
This brings us back to the question of funding.
bring somebody/something ↔ down phrasal verb
1. to reduce something to a lower level:
The government hopes these measures will help to bring down inflation.
2. to fly a plane down to the ground SYN land:
The pilot managed to bring the plane down safely.
3. to make a plane, bird, or animal fall to the ground by shooting at it:
A bomber had been brought down by anti-aircraft fire.
4. to force a government or ruler to stop ruling a country:
a crisis that could bring down the government
5. to make someone fall over:
He was brought down by the goalkeeper and awarded a penalty.
bring something ↔ down on/upon somebody phrasal verb
to make something bad happen to someone, especially to yourself or to people connected with you:
His recklessness brought down disaster on the whole family.
bring something ↔ forth phrasal verb literary
to produce something or make it appear:
a tragic love affair that brought forth only pain
bring something ↔ forward phrasal verb
1. to change an arrangement so that something happens sooner
bring something ↔ forward to
The meeting’s been brought forward to Thursday.
2. bring forward legislation/plans/policies etc to officially introduce plans etc for people to discuss:
The government has brought forward new proposals to tackle the problem of increasing crime.
3. to record the result of a calculation so that it can be used in a further calculation:
The balance brought forward is £21,765.
bring somebody/something ↔ in phrasal verb
1. to introduce a new law:
Harsh anti-Trade Union laws were brought in in the early 1980s.
2. to ask someone to become involved in a discussion or situation:
I’d like to bring in Doctor Hall here and ask him his views.
bring somebody in to do something
The police were brought in to investigate the matter.
3. to earn a particular amount or produce a particular amount of profit:
The sale of the house only brought in about £45,000.
4. to attract customers to a shop or business:
We’ve got to bring in more business if we want the restaurant to survive.
5. bring in a verdict to say officially in a law court whether someone is guilty or not guilty of a crime SYN return a verdict:
The jury brought in a verdict of not guilty.
bring somebody/something into something phrasal verb
1. to cause someone or something to be in a particular situation:
Most of the land has now been brought into cultivation.
The work brought me into contact with a lot of very interesting people.
2. to make someone become involved in a discussion or situation:
The government is trying to bring teachers into the debate on education.
There is a danger that this could bring other countries into the war.
bring something ↔ off phrasal verb
to succeed in doing something difficult SYN pull off:
They managed to bring off the most daring jewellery robbery in history.
bring something ↔ on phrasal verb
1. to make something bad or unpleasant happen SYN cause:
Stress can bring on an asthma attack.
What’s brought this on? Have I upset you somehow?
2. to help someone to improve or make progress:
Teachers have to bring on the bright children and at the same time give extra help to those who need it.
3. to make plants or crops grow faster:
Keeping the young plants in a greenhouse will help bring them on.
4. bring it on informal used to say that you are prepared and willing to deal with something bad that is likely to happen
bring something on/upon somebody phrasal verb
to make something unpleasant happen to someone:
You have brought disaster on the whole village!
bring something on/upon yourself
I’ve got no sympathy for him – he’s brought this all on himself!
bring somebody onto something phrasal verb
if something brings you onto a particular subject, it is a good time for you to start talking about it:
This brings me onto the question of pay rises.
bring something ↔ out phrasal verb
1. to make something easier to see, taste, notice etc:
The spices really bring out the flavour of the meat.
Fatherhood seems to have brought out the caring side of him.
2. to produce something that will be sold to the public:
He’s bringing out a new album next month.
3. to take something out of a place:
Jenny opened the cupboard and brought out a couple of bottles.
4. bring out the best/worst in somebody to make someone behave in the best or worst way that they can:
Alcohol just brings out the worst in her.
5. bring somebody out of himself/herself to make someone feel more confident and able to talk to people:
Changing schools has really brought her out of herself.
bring somebody out in something phrasal verb
if something brings you out in spots, it makes them appear on your skin:
Any foods containing wheat bring him out in a rash.
bring somebody/something round
⇨ BRING AROUND
bring somebody through (something) phrasal verb
to help someone to successfully deal with a very difficult event or period of time:
Both my children have brought me through extremely difficult times since my husband died.
bring somebody ↔ together phrasal verb
1. to arrange for people to meet and do something together:
We brought together researchers from three different universities to work on the project.
2. to make people have a better relationship or feel closer to each other:
Any attack by a foreign power will inevitably bring the people of a country together.
bring somebody/something ↔ up phrasal verb
1. to mention a subject or start to talk about it SYN raise:
Why did you have to bring up the subject of money?
2. to look after and influence a child until he or she is grown up SYN raise:
He was brought up by his grandparents.
bring somebody up to do something
In my day, children were brought up to respect the law.
be brought up (as) a Catholic/Muslim etc
I was brought up a Catholic. ⇨ ↑upbringing
3. to make something appear on a computer screen:
Can you bring up the list of candidates again?
4. British English if you bring food up, it comes back up from your stomach and out of your mouth:
I had a sandwich for lunch and promptly brought it up again.
5. to charge someone with a particular crime and make them go to a court to be judged
bring somebody/something ↔ up before
He was brought up before a magistrate, charged with dangerous driving.
6. bring somebody up short/with a start to surprise someone and make them suddenly stop talking or doing something:
Her question brought me up short.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

bring

 

bring [bring brings brought bringing]   [brɪŋ]    [brɪŋ]  verb (brought, brought   [brɔːt]  ;   [brɔːt]  )

 
COME WITH SB/STH
1. to come to a place with sb/sth
~ sb/sth (with you) Don't forget to bring your books with you.
~ sb/sth to sth She brought her boyfriend to the party.
~ sth for sb Bring a present for Helen.

~ sb sth Bring Helen a present.  

 

PROVIDE

2. to provide sb/sth with sth
~ sb/sth sth His writing brings him $10 000 a year.

~ sth to sb/sth The team's new manager brings ten years' experience to the job.  

 

CAUSE

3. ~ sth to cause sth
The revolution brought many changes.
The news brought tears to his eyes (= made him cry).

• Retirement usually brings with it a massive drop in income.

4. ~ sb/sth + adv./prep. to cause sb/sth to be in a particular condition or place
to bring a meeting to an end
Bring the water to the boil.
Mismanagement had brought the company to the brink of bankruptcy.
• The article brought her into conflict with the authorities.

• Hello Simon! What brings you here?  

 

MAKE SB/STH MOVE

5. to make sb/sth move in a particular direction or way
~ sb/sth + adv./prep. The judge brought his hammer down on the table.

~ sb/sth running Her cries brought the neighbours running (= made them run to her).  

 

ACCUSATION

6. ~ sth (against sb) to officially accuse sb of a crime

• to bring a charge/a legal action/an accusation against sb  

 

FORCE YOURSELF

7. ~ yourself to do sth to force yourself to do sth

• She could not bring herself to tell him the news.

Rem: Idioms containing bring are at the entries for the nouns and adjectives in the idioms, for example bring sb/sth to heel is at heel.
Derived: bring A and B together  bring in something  bring somebody around  bring somebody back  bring somebody before somebody  bring somebody down  bring somebody forth  bring somebody in  bring somebody in something  bring somebody on  bring somebody out  bring somebody out in something  bring somebody out of himself/herself  bring somebody round  bring somebody something back  bring somebody to  bring somebody up  bring somebody up against something  bring something about  bring something around to something  bring something back  bring something down  bring something forward  bring something off  bring something on  bring something on yourself  bring something out  bring something round to something  bring something up
See also: bring somebody around  bring somebody to  bring something around to something
Verb forms:

 
Word Origin:
Old English bringan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch brengen and German bringen.  
Thesaurus:
bring verb T
Bring your books with you.
takecarrydeliverleavetransportflyferry
bring/take/carry/deliver/transport/fly/ferry sb/sth to/from sb/sth
bring/take/carry/transport/fly/ferry sb/sth back/home
bring/take/carry/deliver/transport/ferry sb/sth by car, rail, truck, etc.
Bring or take? Take is used from the point of view of the person who is going somewhere with sth; bring is used from the point of view of sb who is already in the place the person is going to.  
Language Bank:
cause
X causes Y
Childhood obesity can cause / lead to long-term health problems.
Changes in lifestyle and diet over the last twenty years have caused / led to / resulted in a sharp increase in childhood obesity.
Several factors, including changes in diet and lifestyle, have contributed to the increase in childhood obesity.
Research suggests that fast food and soft drinks directly contribute to childhood obesity.
Genetics, lifestyle and diet are all important factors in cases of childhood obesity.
Even small changes in lifestyle and diet can bring about significant weight loss.
Language Banks at because of, consequently, therefore  
Example Bank:
Did you bring anything back with you?
I brought a couple of things from home to brighten the place up.
I've brought something to show you.
• Remember to bring your books with you.

• The ferries brought tourists in their hundreds.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

bring / brɪŋ / verb [ T ] ( brought , brought ) (TOWARDS PLACE)

A2 to take or carry someone or something to a place or a person, or in the direction of the person speaking:

"Shall I bring anything to the party?" "Oh, just a bottle."

[ + two objects ] Bring me that knife/Bring that knife to me.

Can you help me bring in the shopping (= take it into the house) ?

The police brought several men in for questioning (= took them to the police station because they might have been involved in a crime) .

When they visit us they always bring their dog with them.

 

bring / brɪŋ / verb [ T ] ( brought , brought ) (CAUSE)

B1 to cause, result in, or produce a state or condition:

[ + two objects ] She's brought us so much happiness over the years.

[ + -ing verb ] The explosion brought the whole building crash ing to the ground.

Several trees were brought down (= made to fall) by the storm.

The closure of the factory brought poverty to the town (= resulted in it becoming poor) .

Bring the water to the boil ( US to a boil ) (= make it start boiling) .

She suddenly brought the interview to an end .

Her tragic story brought tears to my eyes (= made me cry) .

What will the future bring for these refugees?

bring sb to sth to cause someone to come to a particular place or thing:

This subject brings me to the second part of the discussion.

What brings you (= why have you come) to London?

 

bring / brɪŋ / verb [ T ] ( brought , brought ) (LAW)

to make or begin as part of an official legal process:

He was arrested for fighting, but police have decided not to bring charges .

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

bring

[brɪ̱ŋ]
 
 brings, bringing, brought
 1) VERB If you bring someone or something with you when you come to a place, they come with you or you have them with you.
  [V n] Remember to bring an apron or an old shirt to protect your clothes...
  [V n] Come to my party and bring a girl with you...
  [V n with adv] Someone went upstairs and brought down a huge kettle...
  [V n for n with adv] My father brought home a book for me. [Also V n n with adv, V n prep]
 2) VERB If you bring something somewhere, you move it there.
  [V n with adv] Reaching into her pocket, she brought out a cigarette...
  [V n with adv] Her mother brought her hands up to her face. [Also V n prep]
 3) VERB If you bring something that someone wants or needs, you get it for them or carry it to them.
  [V n to/for n] He went and poured a brandy for Dena and brought it to her...
  [V n n] The stewardess kindly brought me a blanket. [Also V n]
 4) VERB To bring something or someone to a place or position means to cause them to come to the place or move into that position.
  [V n prep/adv] I told you about what brought me here...
  [V n prep/adv] The shock of her husband's arrival brought her to her feet...
  [V n -ing] Edna Leitch survived a gas blast which brought her home crashing down on top of her.
 5) VERB If you bring something new to a place or group of people, you introduce it to that place or cause those people to hear or know about it.
  [V n to n] ...a brave reporter who had risked death to bring the story to the world.
  [V n to n] ...the drive to bring art to the public.
 6) VERB To bring someone or something into a particular state or condition means to cause them to be in that state or condition.
  [V n prep] He brought the car to a stop in front of the square...
  [V n prep] His work as a historian brought him into conflict with the political establishment...
  [V n prep] The incident brings the total of people killed to fifteen...
  [V n with adv] They have brought down income taxes.
 7) VERB If something brings a particular feeling, situation, or quality, it makes people experience it or have it.
  [V n to/on/from n] He called on the United States to play a more effective role in bringing peace to the region...
  [V n to/on/from n] Kinkel said the attacks had brought disgrace on Germany...
  [V n to/on/from n] Banks have brought trouble on themselves by lending rashly...
  [V to n n] He brought to the job not just considerable experience but passionate enthusiasm...
  [V n n] Her three children brought her joy.
 8) VERB If a period of time brings a particular thing, it happens during that time.
  [V n] For Sandro, the new year brought disaster...
  [V n] We don't know what the future will bring.
 9) VERB If you bring a legal action against someone or bring them to trial, you officially accuse them of doing something illegal.
  [V n against n] He campaigned relentlessly to bring charges of corruption against former members of the government...
  [be V-ed to n] The ship's captain and crew may be brought to trial and even sent to prison.
 10) VERB If a television or radio programme is brought to you by an organization, they make it, broadcast it, or pay for it to be made or broadcast. [mainly BRIT]
  [be V-ed to n by n] You're listening to Science in Action, brought to you by the BBC World Service...
  [V n n] We'll be bringing you all the details of the day's events.(in AM, usually use sponsor)
 11) VERB When you are talking, you can say that something brings you to a particular point in order to indicate that you have now reached that point and are going to talk about a new subject.
  [V n to n] Which brings me to a delicate matter I should like to raise...
  [V n to n] And that brings us to the end of this special report from Germany.
 12) VERB: with brd-neg If you cannot bring yourself to do something, you cannot do it because you find it too painful, embarrassing, or disgusting.
  [V pron-refl to-inf] It is all very tragic and I am afraid I just cannot bring myself to talk about it at the moment.
  Syn:
  bear
 13) to bring something alivesee alive
 to bring something to bearsee bear
 to bring the house downsee house
 to bring up the rearsee rear
  Phrasal Verbs:
  - bring about
  - bring along
  - bring around
  - bring back
  - bring down
  - bring forward
  - bring in
  - bring off
  - bring on
  - bring out
  - bring round
  - bring to
  - bring up

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

bring

bring /ˈbrɪŋ/ verb brings; brought /ˈbrɑːt/; bring·ing [+ obj]
1 : to come with (something or someone) to a place
• I'll bring a bottle of wine (with me) when I come to your party.
• “Should I send you a check?” “Why not just bring me the money when you come?”
• Have you brought the money with you from the bank?
• She brought her boyfriend home to meet her parents.
• You stay where you are and I'll bring you another drink. = I'll bring another drink to you.
2 : to cause (something or someone) to come
• Her screams brought [=attracted] help.
• Her screams brought the neighbors running. [=the neighbors ran to help her when they heard her screams]
• Love of adventure brought her here before taking her to many other places.
• This radio station brings you all the news as it happens.
3 : to cause (something) to exist, happen, or start
• Can anything bring peace to this troubled region?
• In this part of the country, winter brings snow (with it).
• The tablets may bring (you) some relief.
• Having a baby has brought great happiness into her life.
• The sad story brought tears to our eyes [=made us cry] but its happy ending brought smiles to our lips. [=made us smile]
4 always followed by an adverb or preposition : to cause (something or someone) to reach a specified state, place, condition, etc.
• The dancer brought his hands up to his face.
• (US) Bring the water to a boil. = (Brit) Bring the water to the boil. [=heat the water so that it boils]
• The pilot brought them safely out of danger.
• Winter snow brought traffic to a stop.
• A few steps brought us to the front door.
• The thrilling climax brought the audience to its/their feet.
• This history book brings us up to the present day.
5 : to have (a particular talent, quality, etc.) when you start to do something (such as a job) - + to
• She brings years of experience to the position. [=she comes to the position with years of experience]
• He brings a rare talent for solving problems to his new job as company president.
6 law : to start a case against someone in a court of law
• They threatened to bring [=institute] legal action against him.
• They are going to bring charges against him. [=they are going to charge him with a crime]
7 : to cause (something) to reach a total - + to
• Last week's sales figures brought our pretax profits for the year to just over $35,000,000.
• The donation brought the fund to over a million dollars.
8 : to get (an amount of money) as a price : to be sold for (a price)
• The painting ought to bring [=fetch] a high price.

In addition to the phrases shown below, bring occurs in many idioms that are shown at appropriate entries throughout the dictionary. For example, bring to bear can be found at 2bear and bring to an end can be found at 1end.

bring about [phrasal verb] bring about (something) also bring (something) about : to cause (something)
• “What brought about the crisis?” “It was brought about by many factors.”
bring around chiefly US or chiefly Brit bring round [phrasal verb]
1 bring (someone) around : to cause (someone) to come around: such as
a : to cause (someone) to accept and support something (such as an idea) after opposing it
• She still says she won't support us, but we'll bring her around eventually. [=we'll convince/persuade her to support us eventually]
- often + to
• I'm sure we can bring her around to our way of thinking.
b : to cause (someone) to become awake again after being unconscious
• The boxer was knocked out and it took the doctor several minutes to bring him around. [=bring him to]
c : to come with (someone) for a social visit
• Why don't you bring your friend around (to my house) after work today?
2 bring (something) around : to cause (something, such as a conversation) to go to a desired subject or area - + to
• We gradually brought the conversation around to the subject of his unpaid bills.
bring back [phrasal verb]
1 bring (something or someone) back or bring back (something or someone)
a : to come back with (something or someone)
• What did you bring back (with you) from your vacation?
• You promised to bring back a present for me. = You promised to bring me back a present.
b : to cause (something or someone) to return
• The death penalty was done away with in this area many years ago, but some people now want it to be brought back.
• The movie is a fantasy about a man who is brought back (to life) from the dead.
• The company is doing poorly, and its former president is being brought back to help solve its problems.
c : to cause (something or someone) to return to a condition, subject, etc.
• That question brings us back (again) to the fundamental problem of world peace.
• We gradually brought the conversation back to the subject of his unpaid bills.
2 bring (something) back or bring back (something) : to cause (something) to return to someone's memory
• Seeing her again brought back a lot of happy memories.
• I had almost forgotten about the time we spent together, but seeing her again brought it all back (to me).
bring before [phrasal verb] bring (someone or something) before (someone or something) formal : to cause (someone or something) to come to (someone or something) for an official decision or judgment
• He was brought (up) before the judge on a charge of obstructing justice.
• The case was finally brought before the Supreme Court.
bring down [phrasal verb]
1 bring down (someone or something) or bring (someone or something) down : to cause (someone or something) to fall down onto the ground
• The deer was brought down by a single shot.
• The plane was brought down by enemy fire.
- often used figuratively
• The government was brought down by a vote of no confidence.
• a famous politician who was brought down by scandal
2 bring (something) down or bring down (something) : to cause (something) to become lower
• Will anything ever bring house prices down?
3 bring (someone) down informal : to cause (someone) to become sad or depressed
• All this rainy weather is really bringing me down. [=getting me down]
bring forth [phrasal verb] bring (something) forth or bring forth (something) somewhat formal : to produce (something)
• The rosebushes brought forth an abundance of flowers.
• He was able to bring forth persuasive arguments in support of his position. : to cause (something) to occur or exist
• Her controversial comments brought forth [=provoked] strong reactions from the public.
bring forward [phrasal verb] bring (something) forward or bring forward (something)
1 : to talk about or show (something) so that it can be seen or discussed by others
• The police have brought new evidence forward.
2 : to make the time of (something) earlier or sooner
• We need to bring the meeting forward from Tuesday to Monday so that more people can attend.
bring in [phrasal verb]
1 bring in (someone) or bring (someone) in : to cause (someone) to become involved in a process, activity, etc.
• The company has decided to bring in outside experts to help on the project.
2 bring in (something) or bring (something) in
a : to produce or earn (an amount of money)
• Each sale brought in $5.
• He works at a large company and brings in a good salary.
b law : to report (an official decision) to a court
• The jury brought in [=returned] a verdict of not guilty. [=the jury said that the defendant was not guilty]
c chiefly Brit : to introduce (a new law, rule, etc.)
• The government is going to bring in legislation to make such practices illegal.
3 bring in (someone or something) or bring (someone or something) in : to cause (someone or something) to come to a place
• The store is having a special sale in order to bring in [=attract] new customers/business.
• The police brought him in (to the police station) for questioning.
bring off [phrasal verb] bring (something) off also bring off (something) : to do (something difficult) : to achieve or accomplish (something)
• It's a challenging role. She's the only actress I know with enough talent to bring it off.
bring on [phrasal verb]
1 bring on (something) or bring (something) on : to cause (something) to appear or occur
• The crisis was brought on by many factors.
2 bring (something) on (someone) : to cause (something bad) to happen to (someone)
• You've brought nothing but shame on your family since the day you were born!
• I can't help thinking you've brought some of this trouble on yourself.
bring out [phrasal verb]
1 bring out (something) or bring (something) out
a : to show (something) : to cause (something) to appear or to be more easily seen
• The debate brought out [=highlighted] the differences between the two candidates.
• That blue sweater really brings out the color in your eyes.
• Our school aims to bring out [=develop] the talents in each of our students.
• A crisis brings out the best in some people and brings out the worst in others. [=a crisis causes some people to behave very well and other people to behave very badly]
b : to produce (something, such as a book) : to cause (something) to become available or to come out
• a writer who's expected to bring out a new novel next year
2 bring (someone) out in (something) Brit : to cause (someone) to begin to have (something, such as a rash) on the skin
• Eating strawberries brings me out in spots. [=eating strawberries makes me break out in spots]
bring round
- see bring around (above)
bring to [phrasal verb] bring (someone) to : to cause (someone) to become awake again after being unconscious
• The boxer was knocked out and it took the doctor several minutes to bring him to. [=bring him around]
bring together [phrasal verb] bring (people) together or bring together (people) : to cause (people) to join or meet : to cause (people) to come together
• She and her husband were brought together by a shared love of the natural world.
• The conference has brought together some of the world's leading experts on laser technology.
bring up [phrasal verb]
1 bring (someone) up or bring up (someone) : to take care of and teach (a child who is growing up)
• I was born and brought up [=raised, reared] in Chicago.
• My grandparents brought me up after my parents died.
• My parents brought me up to respect authority. [=my parents taught me to respect authority when I was a child]
2 bring (something) up or bring up (something)
a : to mention (something) when talking : to start to talk about (something)
• We were waiting for a suitable moment to bring up [=introduce, raise] the subject of his unpaid bills.
• I wasn't going to talk about money, but since you've brought it up, I guess it's something we should really discuss.
• I'm glad you mentioned money. That brings up the question of how much we can afford to spend.
b computers : to cause (something, such as a file or picture) to appear on a computer screen
• The system makes it easy to bring up (on the screen) information about any customer.
c1vomit
• The patient tried to eat some breakfast but immediately brought it back up again.
3 bring (someone) up : to cause (someone) to stop suddenly - used in phrases like bring up short and bring up suddenly
• He was just starting to argue when her scream brought him up short.
bring yourself : to force yourself to do something that you do not want to do - usually used in negative statements
• He knew that he should apologize, but he couldn't bring himself to do it.
- bring·er noun, pl -ers [count]
• a bringer of good news

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