British English

pride

pride [noun] (SATISFACTION)

A feeling of pleasure and satisfaction that you get because you or people connected with you have done or got something good

US /praɪd/ 
UK /praɪd/ 

سربلندی ، افتخار

مثال: 

She felt a great sense of pride as she watched him accept the award.

آهنگ وترانه: 
You Are The Reason - Chris De Burgh

Oxford Essential Dictionary

pride

 noun (no plural)

1 the feeling that you are proud of something that you or others have got or have done:
She showed us her painting with great pride.

2 the feeling that you are better than other people

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

pride

I. pride1 S3 W3 /praɪd/ BrE AmE noun
[Language: Old English; Origin: pryde, from prud 'proud']
1. FEELING OF PLEASURE [uncountable] a feeling that you are proud of something that you or someone connected with you has achieved ⇨ proud:
He wore his medals with pride.
pride in
He takes great pride in his children’s achievements.
The people have a sense of pride in their community.
His heart swelled with pride when his daughter came in.
She felt a glow of pride when her name was announced for the prize.
Success in sport is a source of national pride.
2. RESPECT [uncountable] a feeling that you like and respect yourself and that you deserve to be respected by other people ⇨ proud
sb’s pride
It hurt his pride when his wife left him.
I think that getting a job would give him his pride back.
She didn’t try to hide her anger and injured pride.
It’s a matter of pride for some men that their wives don’t have to work.
3. TOO MUCH PRIDE [uncountable] a belief that you are better than other people and do not need their help or support ⇨ proud
sb’s pride
His pride wouldn’t allow him to ask for help.
She ought to swallow her pride (=ignore or forget her feelings of pride) and call him.
4. take pride in your work/appearance etc to do something very carefully and well, in a way that gives you a lot of satisfaction:
Your should take more pride in your work.
She took great pride in her appearance.
5. sb’s pride and joy a person or thing that someone is very proud of:
His garden is his pride and joy.
6. the pride of something
a) the thing or person that the people in a particular place are most proud of:
Wigan’s rugby team was the pride of the town.
b) the best thing in a group:
a beautiful Japanese sword that is the pride of our collection
7. have/take pride of place if something has or takes pride of place, it is put in the best place for people to see because it is the thing you are most proud of:
A large photograph of the children had pride of place on the sitting room wall.
8. LIONS [countable] a group of lions:
A young lion had strayed some distance from the pride.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ adjectives
great pride Caroline is pictured here holding the trophy with great pride.
immense pride (=very great) He takes immense pride in his grandson.
national pride (=pride in your country) A flag is a symbol of national pride.
civic pride (=pride in your town or city) The museum is a vital source of civic pride.
■ verbs
take pride in something (=feel proud of something) She takes pride in her beautiful gardens.
be bursting with pride (=feel very proud) I could see that her mother was bursting with pride.
swell with pride (=start to feel very proud) He would swell with pride as he discussed his department’s achievements.
glow with pride (=look very proud) ‘I knew he could do it,’ she said, glowing with pride.
■ phrases
a sense of pride I still feel a sense of pride at having been a member of the regiment.
a source of pride (=a reason to feel proud) The Chinese Olympic Games were a source of pride to the whole country.
• • •
THESAURUS
satisfaction a feeling of happiness or pleasure, especially because you have achieved something good or useful: Most teachers take great pride and satisfaction in their work.
pride a feeling of pleasure and satisfaction that you get when you or someone connected with you has achieved something good: Her father’s pride in her accomplishments was clear. | I was blushing with pride because I had been chosen to be on the team.
contentment the feeling of being happy and satisfied because you have what you want or need. Contentment is rather a formal use: Only when you truly know yourself can you find contentment. | He sat back with a look of deep contentment on his face.
fulfilment British English, fulfillment American English a feeling of being satisfied and happy with your life. Fulfilment is rather a formal use: Some women find fulfillment in being a mother, but this is not true for all women.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

pride

pride [pride prides prided priding] noun, verb   [praɪd]    [praɪd]

noun  

PLEASURE/SATISFACTION
1. uncountable, singular a feeling of pleasure or satisfaction that you get when you or people who are connected with you have done sth well or own sth that other people admire
The sight of her son graduating filled her with pride.
He felt a glow of pride as people stopped to admire his garden.
~ (in sth) I take (a) pride in my work.
~ (in doing sth) We take great pride in offering the best service in town.
I looked with pride at what I had achieved.

• Success in sport is a source of national pride.

2. singular the ~ of sth a person or thing that gives people a feeling of pleasure or satisfaction

• The new sports stadium is the pride of the town.  

RESPECT FOR YOURSELF

3. uncountable the feeling of respect that you have for yourself
Pride would not allow him to accept the money.
Her pride was hurt.
Losing his job was a real blow to his pride.

• It's time to swallow your pride (= hide your feelings of pride) and ask for your job back.

4. uncountable (disapproving) the feeling that you are better or more important than other people
• Male pride forced him to suffer in silence.

see also  proud  

LIONS

5. countable + singular or plural verb a group of lions 
Word Origin:
late Old English prȳde ‘excessive self-esteem’, variant of prȳtu, prȳte, from prūd ‘having a high opinion of one's own worth’, from Old French prud ‘valiant’, based on Latin prodesse ‘be of value’.  
Thesaurus:
pride noun
1. U, sing.
We take great pride in our nation's success in sport.
satisfactionhappinesscontentment|BrE fulfilment|AmE fulfillment
Opp: shame
pride/satisfaction/happiness/contentment/fulfilment in sth
bring sb pride/satisfaction/happiness/contentment/fulfilment
take pride/satisfaction in sth
2. U
I'm sorry if I hurt your pride.
dignityself-esteemself-respectfeelings|sometimes disapproving ego
injured/personal pride/dignity/self-esteem/feelings
hurt sb's pride/feelings
restore sb's pride/dignity/self-esteem/self-respect
3. U (disapproving)
Male pride forced him to suffer in silence.
egoismvanityarrogance|especially written conceit|literary hubris
Opp: humility, Opp: modesty
appeal to sb's pride/vanity 
Synonyms:
satisfaction
happiness pride contentment fulfilment
These are all words for the good feeling that you have when you are happy or when you have achieved sth.
satisfactionthe good feeling that you have when you have achieved sth or when sth that you wanted to happen does happen: He derived great satisfaction from knowing that his son was happy.
happinessthe good feeling that you have when you are happy: Money can't buy you happiness.
pridea feeling of pleasure or satisfaction that you get when you or people who are connected with you have done sth well or own sth that other people admire: The sight of her son graduating filled her with pride.
contentment(rather formal) a feeling of happiness or satisfaction with what you have: They found contentment in living a simple life.
fulfilmenta feeling of happiness or satisfaction with what you do or have done: her search for personal fulfilment
satisfaction, happiness, contentment or fulfilment?
You can feel satisfaction at achieving almost anything, small or large; you feel fulfilment when you do sth useful and enjoyable with your life. Happiness is the feeling you have when things give you pleasure and can be quite a lively feeling; contentment is a quieter feeling that you get when you have learned to find pleasure in things.
satisfaction/happiness/pride/contentment/fulfilment in sth
real satisfaction/happiness/pride/contentment/fulfilment
true satisfaction/happiness/contentment/fulfilment
great satisfaction/happiness/pride
quiet satisfaction/pride/contentment
to feel satisfaction/happiness/pride/contentment
to bring sb satisfaction/happiness/pride/contentment/fulfilment
to find satisfaction/happiness/contentment/fulfilment 
Example Bank:
Businesses rushed to include images of patriotic pride in their marketing.
He smiled with fatherly pride.
He swelled with pride as he held the trophy.
He was nursing his hurt pride.
His masculine pride would not let him admit that a girl had defeated him.
I didn't mean to hurt your pride.
I don't want your money— I have my pride, you know!
I wear my policeman's uniform with pride.
It is a matter of pride for him that he has never accepted money from his family.
It was foolish pride that prevented me from believing her.
It would be stupid to refuse through pride.
She expressed pride in her child's achievement.
She refused his offer tactfully, allowing him to go away with his pride intact.
She refused their help out of pride.
She swallowed her pride and called him.
She takes great pride in her work.
She took justifiable pride in her son's achievements.
Their reputation for fairness is a matter for pride.
They have a fierce pride in their traditions.
They have a strong sense of pride in their work.
They managed to salvage some pride with a late goal.
We want to restore pride in our public services.
the politics of racial pride and Black Power
He loves that boat, it's his pride and joy.
His pride would not allow him to admit she was right.
I take (a) pride in my work.
I'm sorry if I hurt your pride.
It's time to swallow your pride and ask for help.
She was conceited, haughty and full of pride and arrogance.
What's wrong— did I hurt your macho pride?
You're going to have to swallow your pride and ask for your job back.
Idioms: pride goes before a fall  pride of place  somebody's pride and joy

Derived: pride yourself on on doing something 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

pride / praɪd / noun (SATISFACTION)

B2 [ U ] a feeling of pleasure and satisfaction that you get because you or people connected with you have done or got something good:

She felt a great sense of pride as she watched him accept the award.

He felt such pride walking his little daughter down the street.

→  See also proud adjective (SATISFIED)

take pride in sth/sb to feel very pleased about something or someone you are closely connected with:

If you don't take professional pride in your work, you're probably in the wrong job.
 

pride / praɪd / noun [ U ] (RESPECT FOR YOURSELF)

B2 your feelings of your own worth and respect for yourself:

She has too much pride to accept any help.

The country's national pride has been damaged by its sporting failures.

 

pride / praɪd / noun [ U ] disapproving (FEELING OF IMPORTANCE)

the belief that you are better or more important than other people:

Pride was his downfall.

→  See also proud adjective (FEELING IMPORTANT)

 

pride / praɪd / noun [ C ] (LIONS)

a group of lions

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

pride

/praɪd/
(prides, priding, prided)

Frequency: The word is one of the 3000 most common words in English.

1.
Pride is a feeling of satisfaction which you have because you or people close to you have done something good or possess something good.
...the sense of pride in a job well done...
We take pride in offering you the highest standards...
They can look back on their endeavours with pride.
N-UNCOUNT: oft N in n/-ing

2.
Pride is a sense of the respect that other people have for you, and that you have for yourself.
It was a severe blow to Kendall’s pride.
= self-esteem
N-UNCOUNT

3.
Someone’s pride is the feeling that they have that they are better or more important than other people.
His pride may still be his downfall.
= arrogance
N-UNCOUNT [disapproval]

4.
If you pride yourself on a quality or skill that you have, you are very proud of it.
Smith prides himself on being able to organise his own life...
VERB: V pron-refl on -ing/n

5.
Someone or something that is your pride and joy is very important to you and makes you feel very happy.
The bike soon became his pride and joy.
PHRASE: v-link PHR

6.
If something takes pride of place, it is treated as the most important thing in a group of things.
A three-foot-high silver World Championship cup takes pride of place near a carved wooden chair...
PHRASE: PHR after v

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1pride /ˈpraɪd/ noun, pl prides
1 [noncount]
a : a feeling that you respect yourself and deserve to be respected by other people : self-respect
• Being able to work again gave him his pride back.
• Getting caught cheating stripped him of his pride.
Pride would not allow her to give up.
• It's a matter of pride that he does the work all by himself.
b : a feeling that you are more important or better than other people
• The novel is about a family consumed with pride and vanity.
• They needed help, but their pride wouldn't let them ask for it.
• I had to swallow my pride and admit I made a mistake.
2 a : a feeling of happiness that you get when you or someone you know does something good, difficult, etc.

[noncount]

• The sight of her son holding the trophy filled her with pride. [=made her very proud]
• She spoke with pride [=she spoke proudly] about her son's achievements.
• She looked at her painting with pride. [=satisfaction]
• He takes pride in [=is proud of] his work.

[singular]

• He showed a great/immense pride in his family.
b [singular] : a person or thing that makes you feel proud
• These young people are the pride of their community.
3 [count] : a group of lions
pride and joy : someone or something that makes you very proud and happy
• Our children are our pride and joy.
• The car is his pride and joy.
pride of place : the highest position or best place
• The Nobel Prize winner was given pride of place at the conference.
• The statue has pride of place in the center of town.
• A picture of their children took pride of place on the wall.
- pride·ful /ˈpraɪdfəl/ adj [more ~; most ~] US
• a prideful [=proud] parent
• He was too prideful to accept their help.
- pride·ful·ly adv US

best

best [adjective]

Of the highest quality, or being the most suitable, pleasing, or effective type of thing or person

US /best/ 
UK /best/ 

بهترین

مثال: 

That's the best movie I've ever seen! 

آهنگ وترانه: 
You Are The Reason - Chris De Burgh

Oxford Essential Dictionary

adjective (good, better, best)
better than all others:
This is the best ice cream I have ever eaten!
Tom is my best friend.
Jo's the best player on the team.
 opposite worst

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

best

I. best1 S1 W1 /best/ BrE AmE adjective [superlative of good]
[Language: Old English; Origin: betst]
1. better than anything else or anyone else in quality, skill, how effective it is etc:
He won the best actor award.
What’s the best way to cook this fish?
The best thing to do is to stop worrying.
it’s best to do something
It’s best to go later in the season.
easily the best/by far the best (=much better than anything else)
John’s idea is by far the best option.
Our pilots are given the best possible training.
We use only the very best ingredients.
2. best friend the friend that you know and like better than anyone else:
She was my best friend in college.
3. best dress/shoes/clothes etc clothing that you keep for special occasions:
I put on my best suit for the wedding.
4. the next best thing something that is not exactly what you want but is as similar to it as possible:
If sterile equipment isn’t available, the next best thing is to clean equipment with disinfectant.
5. best of all used to introduce the fact about a situation that is even better than the other good things:
It’s clean and well-located, but best of all, it’s affordable.
6. best before British English written on food packets with the date that the food should be eaten before:
Best before 13 July.
a best-before date
be on your best behaviour at ↑behaviour(2), ⇨ your best bet at ↑bet2(2), ⇨ the best/better part of at ↑part1(6)
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ adverbs
the very best He’s one of the very best players around.
easily the best The series was easily the best TV drama this year.
by far the best One girl stood out as by far the best singer.
■ adjectives
the best possible We sold the house at the best possible time.
the best available The tuition we offer here is the best available.
■ nouns
the best way to do/of doing something The best way to learn a language is to live in a country where it is spoken.
the best thing to do The best thing to do is to apologize immediately.
the best way forward (=the best way to make progress or deal with a problem) We believe that a merger is the best way forward for the business.
make the best use of something Making the best use of space is important in any room.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

best

best [best bests bested besting] adjective, adverb, noun, verb   [best]    [best] 

adjective (superlative of good)
1. of the most excellent type or quality
That's the best movie I've ever seen!
He wrote his best songs before he was 25.
She was one of the best tennis players of her generation.
Is that your best suit?
They've been best friends (= closest friends) since they were children.
the company's best-ever results

• We want the kids to have the best possible education.

2. most enjoyable; happiest

• Those were the best years of my life.

3. most suitable or appropriate
What's the best way to cook steak?
The best thing to do would be to apologize.
He's the best man for the job.
It's best if you go now.

• I'm not in the best position to advise you.

Rem: Idioms containing best adj. are at the entries for the nouns and verbs in the idioms, for example on your best behaviour is at behaviour.  
Word Origin:
Old English betest (adjective), betost, betst (adverb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch and German best, also to better.  
Thesaurus:
best adj.
the best way to cook steak
It's best if you go now.
idealoptimumwisesensiblepreferred|formal desirableadvisable|formal, BrE favoured|formal, AmE favored
Opp: worst
be best/wise/sensible/desirable/advisable to do sth
the best/the optimum/a wise/a sensible/an ideal/the preferred choice
the best/a wise/a sensible thing to do  
Example Bank:
Owen judged it best to make no reply.
This is by far the best restaurant in the town.
We aim to give our guests the very best attention.
Who in the class is best at history?
He's the best man for the job.
I'm not in the best position to advise you.
It's best if you go now.
• What's the best way to cook steak?

Idioms: all the best  as best you can  at best  best of a bad bunch  best of three/five  best that money can buy  do/mean something for the best  for the best  get the best of something  make the best of a bad job  make the best of it  make the best of things  the best of your belief  with the best 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

best / best / adjective

A1 of the highest quality, or being the most suitable, pleasing, or effective type of thing or person:

This is the best meal I've ever had.

He's one of our best students.

Are you sure this is the best way of doing it?

What's the best (= shortest or quickest) way to get to the station?

Your parents only want what is best for you.

She was my best friend (= the friend I liked most) .

It's best (= it is wise) to get to the supermarket early.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

best

/best/

Frequency: The word is one of the 700 most common words in English.

1.
Best is the superlative of good.
If you want further information the best thing to do is have a word with the driver as you get on the bus...
It’s not the best place to live if you wish to develop your knowledge and love of mountains.

2.
Best is the superlative of well.
James Fox is best known as the author of White Mischief.

3.
The best is used to refer to things of the highest quality or standard.
We offer only the best to our clients...
He’ll have the best of care.
worst
N-SING: the N

4.
Someone’s best is the greatest effort or highest achievement or standard that they are capable of.
Miss Blockey was at her best when she played the piano...
One needs to be a first-class driver to get the best out of that sort of machinery.
N-SING: oft poss N

5.
If you say that something is the best that can be done or hoped for, you think it is the most pleasant, successful, or useful thing that can be done or hoped for.
A draw seems the best they can hope for...
The best we can do is try to stay cool and muddle through.
N-SING: the N

6.
If you like something best or like it the best, you prefer it.
The thing I liked best about the show was the music...
Mother liked it best when Daniel got money...
What was the role you loved the best?
= most
ADV: ADV after v, oft the ADV

7.
Best is used to form the superlative of compound adjectives beginning with ‘good’ and ‘well’. For example, the superlative of ‘well-known’ is ‘best-known’.

8.
see also second best, Sunday best

9.
You can say ‘All the best’ when you are saying goodbye to someone, or at the end of a letter.
Wish him all the best, and tell him we miss him.
CONVENTION [formulae]

10.
You use best of all to indicate that what you are about to mention is the thing that you prefer or that has most advantages out of all the things you have mentioned.
It was comfortable and cheap: best of all, most of the rent was being paid by two American friends.
PHRASE: PHR with cl/group

11.
If someone does something as best they can, they do it as well as they can, although it is very difficult.
The older people were left to carry on as best they could.
PHRASE: V inflects, PHR after v

12.
You use at best to indicate that even if you describe something as favourably as possible or if it performs as well as it possibly can, it is still not very good.
This policy, they say, is at best confused and at worst non-existent...
PHRASE: PHR with cl/group

13.
If you do your best or try your best to do something, you try as hard as you can to do it, or do it as well as you can.
I’ll do my best to find out...
It wasn’t her fault, she was trying her best to help...
PHRASE: V inflects, oft PHR to-inf

14.
If you say that something is for the best, you mean it is the most desirable or helpful thing that could have happened or could be done, considering all the circumstances.
Whatever the circumstances, parents are supposed to know what to do for the best.
PHRASE: PHR after v, v-link PHR

15.
If two people are the best of friends, they are close friends, especially when they have had a disagreement or fight in the past.
Magda is now married to George Callerby and we are the best of friends.
PHRASE: usu v-link PHR

16.
If you say that a particular person knows best, you mean that they have a lot of experience and should therefore be trusted to make decisions for other people.
He was convinced that doctors and dentists knew best.
PHRASE: V inflects

17.
If you make the best of something, you accept an unsatisfactory situation cheerfully and try to manage as well as you can. In British English, you can also say that you make the best of a bad job.
She instilled in the children the virtues of good hard work, and making the best of what you have.
PHRASE: V inflects

18.
to the best of your ability: see ability
to hope for the best: see hope
to the best of your knowledge: see knowledge
best of luck: see luck
the best part: see part
at the best of times: see time
the best of both worlds: see world

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1best /ˈbɛst/ adj superlative form of 1good or of 2well
1 a : better than all others in quality or value
• You should wear your best clothes tonight.
• He took us to the (very) best restaurants in the city.
• We ate the best food and drank the best wines.
• You're our best customers.
• His modesty and sense of humor are his best qualities.
• Is that your best offer?
• I've had the best time with you! [=I've had a very enjoyable time with you]
• The best [=most valuable] things in life are free.
• Which of these do you think tastes best?
• Mary sends you her very best wishes/regards.
• He's my best friend. [=my closest/dearest friend] = He and I are best friends.
b : most skillful, talented, or successful
• She's the best student in her class.
• He won the award for best actor in a drama.
• the team's best player
2 : most appropriate, useful, or helpful
• She truly believes that this is the best way to solve the problem.
• She's the team's best hope/chance for a medal.
• She thought waiting was best. = She thought that the best thing to do was to wait. = She thought that it was best to wait.
• It's best to leave early if you want to be sure of arriving on time.
• We want to do what's best for you.
• He's the best man for the job.
• You should do whatever you think is the best thing to do. = You should do whatever you think best.
• We're making the best possible use of these materials.
best of all
✦The phrase best of all is often used to refer to the most important or appealing part of something that has many good parts.
• The machine is easy to use, easy to clean, and best of all, it's absolutely free when you order these books.
next best
✦A person or thing that is next best is not as good as the best person or thing but is better than all others.
• The shortstop is the best player on the team, and the catcher is the next best player.
• We can't see each other often, but calling each other on the telephone is the next best thing.
on your best behavior
✦If you are on your best behavior you are behaving very politely and well.
• Remember to be on your best behavior with your grandmother.
• The children promised to be on their best behavior.

damn

damn [exclamation]

An expression of anger

US /dæm/ 
UK /dæm/ 

لعنت‌

مثال: 

Damn, I've spilled coffee down my blouse!

Oxford Essential Dictionary

damn

 exclamation
a rude word that people sometimes use when they are angry:
Damn! I've lost my key!

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

damn

I. damn1 /dæm/ BrE AmE interjection not polite
1. used when you are very annoyed or disappointed:
Damn! I’ve left my keys in the office.
2. used when something is impressive or surprising:
Damn, she’s old.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

damn

damn [damn damns damned damning] exclamation, adjective, verb, adverb, noun   [dæm]    [dæm]

exclamation (also old-fashioned dam·mit   [ˈdæmɪt]  ;   [ˈdæmɪt]  ˈdamn it) (informal) a swear word that people use to show that they are annoyed, disappointed, etc.
Oh damn! I forgot he was coming.  
Word Origin:
Middle English: from Old French dam(p)ner, from Latin dam(p)nare ‘inflict loss on’, from damnum ‘loss, damage’.

Idioms: I'll be damned!  I'm damned if …  damn all  damn somebody with faint praise  damn the consequences/expense  not care a damn 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

damn / dæm / exclamation ( also damn it , also dammit ) informal

B1 an expression of anger:

Damn, I've spilled coffee down my blouse!

→  See also goddamn

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

damn

/dæm/
(damns, damning, damned)

1.
Damn, damn it, and dammit are used by some people to express anger or impatience. (INFORMAL, RUDE)
Don’t be flippant, damn it! This is serious.
EXCLAM [feelings]

2.
Damn is used by some people to emphasize what they are saying. (INFORMAL, RUDE)
There’s not a damn thing you can do about it now.
ADJ: ADJ n [emphasis]

Damn is also an adverb.
As it turned out, I was damn right...
ADV: ADV adj/adv

3.
If you say that a person or a news report damns something such as a policy or action, you mean that they are very critical of it.
...a sensational book in which she damns the ultra-right party.
= slam
VERB: V n

4.
see also damned, damning

5.
If you say that someone does not give a damn about something, you are emphasizing that they do not care about it at all. (INFORMAL, RUDE)
PHRASE: V inflects [emphasis]

6.
Some people say as near as damn it or as near as dammit to emphasize that what they have said is almost completely accurate, but not quite. (BRIT INFORMAL, RUDE)
It’s as near as damn it the same thing...
PHRASE: usu PHR n [emphasis]

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1damn /ˈdæm/ interj informal + impolite
- used to show that you are angry, annoyed, surprised, etc.
Damn! That really hurt!
• Well, damn. Why didn't you say you wouldn't be able to come?
Damn! I had no idea you were planning a party for me!

fast-forward

fast-forward [verb]

If you fast-forward a recording, or if it fast-forwards, you make it play at very high speed so that you get to the end or a later part more quickly

US /ˌfæstˈfɔːr.wɚd/ 
UK /ˌfɑːstˈfɔː.wəd/ 

جلو بردن

مثال: 

I hate this song - I'll fast-forward to the next one.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

fast-forward

ˌfast-ˈforward BrE AmE verb [intransitive and transitive]
1. to wind a tape or video forwards quickly without playing it
2. to move quickly to a later point in a story
fast-forward to
Fast-forward to York at the turn of the century.
—fast-forward noun [uncountable]

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

fast-forward

ˌfast-ˈforward [fast forward fast-forward]       verb

1. transitive, intransitive ~ (sth) to wind a tape or video forward without playing it

2. intransitive ~ to sth | + adv./prep. to move quickly forwards in time, especially to a later point in a story
The action then fast-forwards to Ettore as a young man.

Derived Word: fast forward

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

ˌ fast- ˈ forward / ˌfɑːstˈfɔː.wəd /   / ˌfæstˈfɔːr.wɚd / verb [ I or T ]

If you fast-forward a recording, or if it fast-forwards, you make it play at very high speed so that you get to the end or a later part more quickly:

I hate this song - I'll fast-forward to the next one.

The tape jammed while I was fast-forwarding it.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

fast forward

also fast-forward
(fast forwards, fast forwarding, fast forwarded)

1.
When you fast forward the tape in a video or tape recorder or when you fast forward, you make the tape go forwards. Compare rewind.
Just fast forward the video...
He fast-forwarded the tape past the explosion...
The urge to fast-forward is almost irresistible.
VERB: V n, V n prep/adv, V, also V prep/adv

2.
If you put a video or cassette tape on fast forward, you make the tape go forwards. Compare rewind.
Before recording onto a new tape, wind it on fast forward, then rewind...
N-UNCOUNT: oft on N

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

fast-forward

2fast–forward verb -wards; -ward·ed; -ward·ing
1 [+ obj] : to cause (a recording) to go forward at a speed that is faster than normal
• We fast-forwarded the tape to get to the last song.
- opposite 1rewind
2 [no obj] : to move forward through time quickly
• He wished he could fast-forward to the future, when he would no longer be a student.

video

video [noun] (FILM)

A recording of moving pictures and sound, especially as a digital file, DVD, etc

US /ˈvɪd.i.oʊ/ 
UK /ˈvɪd.i.əʊ/ 

ویدئو، فیلم

مثال: 

I'd ​far ​rather go to the ​theatre than ​watch a video.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

video

 noun (plural videos)

1 (also videotape) tape in a plastic box (called a cassette) on which a film, TV programme or real event is recorded:
You can get this film on video or on DVD.
We stayed at home and watched a video.
They made a video of the wedding.

2 (British) (also video recorder) a machine connected to a television, that you use for recording or showing programmes:
Have you set the video?

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

video

I. video1 S1 W2 /ˈvɪdiəʊ $ -dioʊ/ BrE AmE noun (plural videos)
1. [uncountable and countable] a copy of a film or television programme, or a series of events, recorded on ↑videotape
hire a video British English rent a video American English:
How much does it cost to hire videos?
Let’s stay at home and watch a video.
Rewind the video right to the beginning.
The school will be making a video of the play.
on video
The movie has not yet been released on video.
coming soon to a video store near you
2. [countable] a plastic box containing special tape for recording programmes and films on television SYN videotape, video cassette:
Have we got a blank video (=one with nothing recorded on it yet) anywhere?
3. [countable] British English a machine used to record television programmes or show videos SYN VCR, video cassette recorder
programme/set the video
Can you set the video to record the football match?
4. [uncountable] the process of recording or showing television programmes, films, real events etc on ↑videotape:
The course aims to help children learn through video.
5. [countable] a short film that is made to go with a particular piece of popular music SYN music video
6. [countable] a ↑digital recording of an event, for example one made using a ↑mobile phone:
a video clip shown on the Internet
• • •
COLLOCATIONS (for Meaning 4)
■ video + NOUN
video footage Police are currently studying video footage to identify the rioters.
a video recording Can a video recording of an interview with a child be used in a court as evidence?
a video image (=a moving picture on a video) Video images of the surgery are sent to a special lecture theatre, so that students can observe.
a video clip (=a short video) You can download video clips from the Internet.
video evidence (=a recording of events, used in a court) Video evidence of illegal activities can later be used in court.
■ verbs
record something on video She had no idea that her purchase was being recorded on video.
be captured/caught on video (=recorded on video) The crime was captured on video.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

video

video [video videos] noun, verb   [ˈvɪdiəʊ]    [ˈvɪdioʊ]

noun (pl. videos)
1. (also video·tape) uncountable, countable a type of magnetic tape used for recording moving pictures and sound; a box containing this tape, also called a video cassette
The movie will be released on video in June.

• Do we have a blank video?

2. uncountable a system of recording moving pictures and sound, either using videotape or a digital method of storing data
• A wedding is the perfect subject for video.

• the use of video in schools

3. countable a copy of a film/movie, programme, etc. that is recorded on videotape
a video of ‘ET’
a home video (= not a professional one)

• a video shop/store

 

4. (also ˈmusic video) countable a short film made by a pop or rock band to be shown with a song when it is played on television

5. (also ˈvideo clip) countable a short film or recording of an event, made using digital technology and viewed on a computer, especially over the Internet
The school made a short promotional video.

• Upload your videos and share them with friends and family online.

6. countable (BrE) =  video cassette recorder
to programme the video to record the football match  
Word Origin:
1930s: from Latin videre ‘to see’, on the pattern of audio.  
Collocations:
Cinema/the movies
Watching
go to/take sb to (see) a film/movie
go to/sit in (BrE) the cinema/(NAmE) the (movie) theater
rent a film/movie/DVD
download a film/movie/video
burn/copy/rip a DVD
see/watch a film/movie/DVD/video/preview/trailer
Showing
show/screen a film/movie
promote/distribute/review a film/movie
(BrE) be on at the cinema
be released on/come out on/be out on DVD
captivate/delight/grip/thrill the audience
do well/badly at the box office
get a lot of/live up to the hype
Film-making
write/co-write a film/movie/script/screenplay
direct/produce/make/shoot/edit a film/movie/sequel/video
make a romantic comedy/a thriller/an action movie
do/work on a sequel/remake
film/shoot the opening scene/an action sequence/footage (of sth)
compose/create/do/write the soundtrack
cut/edit (out) a scene/sequence
Acting
have/get/do an audition
get/have/play a leading/starring/supporting role
play a character/James Bond/the bad guy
act in/appear in/star in a film/movie/remake
do/perform/attempt a stunt
work in/make it big in Hollywood
forge/carve/make/pursue a career in Hollywood
Describing films
the camera pulls back/pans over sth/zooms in (on sth)
the camera focuses on sth/lingers on sth
shoot sb/show sb in extreme close-up
use odd/unusual camera angles
be filmed/shot on location/in a studio
be set/take place in London/in the '60s
have a happy ending/plot twist 
Example Bank:
An amateur video of the crash failed to reveal the cause.
Did you remember to set the video for ‘EastEnders’?
He posted a video on his website
I can't find the video channel on this television.
She started making a video diary of her life.
The band are in Iceland doing a video shoot.
The children can sit for hours watching videos.
The film is already out on video.
The group's new video will be released next month.
The infamous video nasty is now a cult film.
The jury watched video footage of the riots.
The speech was broadcast via a video link to thousands standing outside.
The thief was caught on video as he pocketed watches and rings.
Their teacher showed them a video about the Inuit.
They produce educational videos for learning languages.
They sell both blank and pre-recorded videos.
This article and the accompanying video takes you through each stage step by step.
Video files can be readily transmitted over digital broadband.
We rent videos nearly every weekend.
You need a broadband Internet connection to stream video online.
a review of the latest video releases
a security video of the attack
• The school made a short promotional video.

• You can view and share video clips on this website.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

video / ˈvɪd.i.əʊ /   / -oʊ / noun ( plural videos ) (FILM)

A2 [ U or C ] a recording of moving pictures and sound, especially as a digital file, DVD, etc.:

My new laptop handles video really well.

People can upload videos of their pets to this website.

We had a video made of our wedding.

"Avatar" is now available on video.

→  See also tape noun (RECORDING)

A2 [ C ] ( also music video ) a short film made to advertise a popular song

 

video / ˈvɪd.i.əʊ /   / -oʊ / noun [ C ] ( plural videos ) (MACHINE)

UK for videocassette recorder

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

video

/vɪdioʊ/
(videos, videoing, videoed)

Frequency: The word is one of the 1500 most common words in English.

1.
A video is a film or television programme recorded on tape for people to watch on a television set.
...the makers of films and videos.
N-COUNT

2.
Video is the system of recording films and events on tape so that people can watch them on a television set.
She has watched the race on video.
...manufacturers of audio and video equipment.
N-UNCOUNT: oft on N

3.
A video is a machine that you can use to record television programmes and play videotapes on a television set. (mainly BRIT; in AM, usually use VCR)
He’d set the video for 8.00.
= video recorder, VCR
N-COUNT

4.
If you video a television programme or event, you record it on tape using a video recorder or video camera, so that you can watch it later. (mainly BRIT; in AM, usually use tapevideotape)
She had been videoing the highlights of the tournament...
= videotape, tape
VERB: V n

5.
Video is a system by which you can see television images or films on your computer, rather than on a television set.
N-UNCOUNT

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1vid·eo /ˈvɪdijoʊ/ noun, pl -eos
1 [count] : a movie, television show, event, etc., that has been recorded onto a videocassette, DVD, etc., so that it can be watched on a television or computer screen
• We're going to rent a couple of videos to watch this weekend.
• She was talking about a popular video she saw on the Internet.
• The video of their wedding was made by a professional company.
• They showed us some of their home videos. [=recordings that they had made using a video camera]
2 [noncount]1videotape 1
• The movie is available on video and DVD.
3 [count] : a recorded performance of a song in which visual images are shown together with the music
• a TV channel that plays videos all day
• Her latest music video was first released on the Internet.
4 [noncount] : the moving images that are seen in a recording or broadcast
• The audio is OK but there's a problem with the video.

punish

punish [verb] (CRIME)

to cause someone who has done something wrong or committed a crime to suffer, by hurting them, forcing them to pay money, sending them to prison, etc.

US /ˈpʌn.ɪʃ/ 
UK /ˈpʌn.ɪʃ/ 

تنبيه‌ كردن‌، ادب‌ كردن‌،

مثال: 

He punished his children.

او فرزندانش را تنبیه کرد.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

punish

 verb (punishes, punishing, punished )
to make somebody suffer because they have done something wrong:
The children were punished for telling lies.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

punish

punish /ˈpʌnɪʃ/ BrE AmE verb [transitive]
[Word Family: adjective: ↑punishable, ↑punishing, ↑unpunished, ↑punitive; verb: ↑punish; noun: ↑punishment]
[Date: 1300-1400; Language: Old French; Origin: punir, from Latin punire, from poena; ⇨ ↑pain1]
1. to make someone suffer because they have done something wrong or broken the law ⇨ punishment, punitive:
Smacking is not an acceptable way of punishing a child.
He promised to punish severely any officials found guilty of electoral fraud.
punish somebody for (doing) something
It’s unfair to punish a whole class for the actions of one or two students.
They deserve to be punished for putting passengers at risk.
I felt I was being punished for what my mother had done.
punish somebody by doing something
My parents decided to punish me by withdrawing financial support.
punish somebody with something
The House voted to punish the senator with a formal reprimand.
2. [usually passive] if a crime is punished in a particular way, anyone who is guilty of it is made to suffer in that way ⇨ punishment, punitive
punish by/with
In some societies, theft is punished by death.
3. punish yourself to make yourself feel guilty or bad for something you have done:
If you fail, don’t punish yourself.

THESAURUS
punish to do something unpleasant to someone because they have done something wrong or broken the law: Drug smugglers are severely punished. | She wanted to punish him for deceiving her.
fine to make someone pay money as a punishment: The company was fined for safety violations.
sentence if a judge sentences a criminal, he or she gives them an official punishment, usually sending them to prison for a period of time: The judge sentenced Margolis to a year in prison.
penalize (also penalise British English) to officially punish someone, especially by taking away their right to do something or by limiting their freedom in some way: New laws will penalize firms that continue to pollute the environment.
discipline to punish someone who has broken the rules of an organization that they belong to or work for: Officers are expected to discipline soldiers who do not keep their uniforms in good condition.
come down hard on somebody informal to punish someone or criticize them severely: The judge came down hard on Harris, saying that his crime was ‘inexcusable’.
make an example of somebody to punish someone so that other people are afraid to do the same thing: Athletics officials felt they had to make an example of him for using banned drugs.
teach somebody a lesson informal to do something in order to show someone that they must not do something again, when they have behaved very badly: I didn't want to hurt him - I just wanted teach him a lesson. | Maybe a night in jail will teach him a lesson.
make somebody pay (for something) informal to make someone wish they had never done something, by making them suffer: We should make him pay for all the mischief he's caused!

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

punish

 

pun·ish [punish punishes punished punishing]   [ˈpʌnɪʃ]    [ˈpʌnɪʃ]  verb
1. to make sb suffer because they have broken the law or done sth wrong
~ sb Those responsible for this crime will be severely punished.
• My parents used to punish me by not letting me watch TV.

~ sb for sth/for doing sth He was punished for refusing to answer their questions.

2. ~ sth (by/with sth) to set the punishment for a particular crime

• In those days murder was always punished with the death penalty.

3. ~ yourself (for sth) to blame yourself for sth that has happened
Verb forms:

 
Word Origin:
Middle English: from Old French puniss-, lengthened stem of punir ‘punish’, from Latin punire, from poena ‘penalty’.  
Thesaurus:
punish verb T
He was punished for refusing to answer their questions.
disciplinepenalizesentence|informal come down on sb
Opp: reward
punish/discipline/penalize/sentence/come down on sb for doing sth
punish/penalize/sentence/come down on an offender
punish/penalize (bad, unacceptable, etc.) behaviour  
Example Bank:
Damages are not designed to punish, but to compensate for the loss sustained.
He was trying to punish her for deserting him all those years ago.
Never punish children by making them go hungry.
Offenders will be punished with a £1 000 fine.
They will be severely punished for their crimes.
Those found guilty will be punished accordingly.
Those who had opposed the court were duly punished.
He is guilty of contempt of court and is liable to be punished accordingly.
• I would not hesitate to condemn and punish unacceptable behaviour.

• The state is no longer effective in punishing crime.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

punish / ˈpʌn.ɪʃ / verb [ T ] (CRIME)

B1 to cause someone who has done something wrong or committed a crime to suffer, by hurting them, forcing them to pay money, sending them to prison, etc.:

Those responsible for these crimes must be brought to court and punished.

He punished the class by giv ing them extra work.

The oil company was found guilty on ten counts of pollution, and was punished with a $250 million fine.

→  See also punitive

to punish anyone who commits a particular crime:

Drunken driving can be punished with a prison sentence.

 

punish / ˈpʌn.ɪʃ / verb [ T ] (TREAT BADLY)

to use or treat something badly, violently, or without care:

He really punishes that horse of his.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

punish

[pʌ̱nɪʃ]
 punishes, punishing, punished
 1) VERB To punish someone means to make them suffer in some way because they have done something wrong.
  [V n] I don't believe that George ever had to punish the children...
  [V n] According to present law, the authorities can only punish smugglers with small fines...
  [V n for n] Don't punish your child for being honest.
 2) VERB To punish a crime means to punish anyone who commits that crime.
  [V n] The government voted to punish corruption in sport with up to four years in jail...
  [V n] Such behaviour is unacceptable and will be punished.

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

punish

pun·ish /ˈpʌnɪʃ/ verb -ish·es; -ished; -ish·ing [+ obj]
1 a : to make (someone) suffer for a crime or for bad behavior
• I think that murderers should be punished by/with life imprisonment.
• She was punished for lying.
• His parents punished him by taking away his allowance.
b : to make someone suffer for (a crime or bad behavior)
• How should I punish my child's misbehavior?
• State law punishes fraud with fines.
• The law states that treason shall be punished by death. [=that the punishment for treason is death]
2 : to treat (someone or something) severely or roughly
• I don't understand why women continue to punish [=damage] their feet by wearing high-heeled shoes.

 

sin

sin [noun]

the offence of breaking, or the breaking of, a religious or moral law

US /sɪn/ 
UK /sɪn/ 

گناه‌، معصيت‌

مثال: 

to commit a sin

گناه‌ كردن‌

Oxford Essential Dictionary

sin

 noun
something that your religion says you should not do, because it is very bad:
Stealing is a sin.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

sin

I. sin1 S2 /sɪn/ BrE AmE noun
[Language: Old English; Origin: synn]
1. [uncountable and countable] an action that is against religious rules and is considered to be an offence against God
sin of
the sin of pride
She needed to confess her sins and ask for forgiveness.
He knew that he had committed a terrible sin.
the seven deadly sins (=seven bad feelings or desires, in the Christian religion)
2. a sin informal something that you think is very wrong
it is a sin (to do something)
There’s so much lovely food here, it would be a sin to waste it.
3. live in sin old-fashioned if two people live in sin, they live together in a sexual relationship without being married
4. as miserable/ugly/guilty as sin especially British English spoken very unhappy, ugly, or guilty:
I saw Margaret this morning looking as miserable as sin.
5. for my sins especially British English spoken an expression used to suggest jokingly that you have to do something as a punishment:
I work at head office now, for my sins.
sinful
cover/hide a multitude of sins at ↑multitude(4), ⇨ ↑cardinal sin, ↑mortal sin, ↑original sin

COLLOCATIONS
■ verbs
commit a sin He has committed a grave sin.
confess your sins He knelt and confessed his sins to God.
forgive sins God has forgiven all my sins.
repent (of) your sins (=be sorry you committed them) I sincerely repent of my sins.
■ phrases
the seven deadly sins (=seven bad feelings or desires, in the Christian religion, for example greed or too much pride)
■ adjectives
a great sin Possibly the greatest sin you can be guilty of is not speaking out against cruelty or injustice when you see it.
a besetting sin literary (=one that you keep committing) Drunkenness was his besetting sin.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

sin

 

sin [sin sins sinned sinning] noun, verb, abbreviation   [sɪn]    [sɪn] 

 

noun
1. countable an offence against God or against a religious or moral law
to commit a sin
Confess your sins to God and he will forgive you.
• The Bible says that stealing is a sin.

see also  mortal sin, original sin

2. uncountable the act of breaking a religious or moral law

• a life of sin

3. countable, usually singular (informal) an action that people strongly disapprove of
It's a sin to waste taxpayers' money like that.
see also  sinful, sinner 
more at cover/hide a multitude of sins at  multitude, live in sin at  live1  
Word Origin:
v. and n. Old English synn (noun), syngian (verb); probably related to Latin sons, sont- ‘guilty’.  
Collocations:
Religion
Being religious
believe in God/Christ/Allah/free will/predestination/heaven and hell/an afterlife/reincarnation
be/become a believer/an atheist/an agnostic/a Christian/Muslim/Hindu/Buddhist, etc.
convert to/practise/ (especially US) practice a religion/Buddhism/Catholicism/Christianity/Islam/Judaism, etc.
go to church/(NAmE) temple (= the synagogue)
go to the local church/mosque/synagogue/gurdwara
belong to a church/a religious community
join/enter the church/a convent/a monastery/a religious sect/the clergy/the priesthood
praise/worship/obey/serve/glorify God
Celebrations and ritual
attend/hold/conduct/lead a service
perform a ceremony/a rite/a ritual/a baptism/the Hajj/a mitzvah
carry out/perform a sacred/burial/funeral/fertility/purification rite
go on/make a pilgrimage
celebrate Christmas/Easter/Eid/Ramadan/Hanukkah/Passover/Diwali
observe/break the Sabbath/a fast/Ramadan
deliver/preach/hear a sermon
lead/address the congregation
say/recite a prayer/blessing
Religious texts and ideas
preach/proclaim/spread the word of God/the Gospel/the message of Islam
study/follow the dharma/the teachings of Buddha
read/study/understand/interpret scripture/the Bible/the Koran/the gospel/the Torah
be based on/derive from divine revelation
commit/consider sth heresy/sacrilege
Religious belief and experience
seek/find/gain enlightenment/wisdom
strengthen/lose your faith
keep/practise/practice/abandon the faith
save/purify/lose your soul
obey/follow/keep/break/violate a commandment/Islamic law/Jewish law
be/accept/do God's will
receive/experience divine grace
achieve/attain enlightenment/salvation/nirvana
undergo a conversion/rebirth/reincarnation
hear/answer a prayer
commit/confess/forgive a sin
do/perform penance 
Example Bank:
Even politicians are not immune from the sins of the flesh.
It's considered a sin to be disrespectful to your parents.
Our sons will pay for the sins of their fathers.
Sin against others is seen as a sin against God.
The besetting sin of 18th-century urban Britain was drunkenness.
They had confessed their sins and done their penance.
They would have to expiate their sins through suffering.
We believe in the forgiveness of sins.
We have repented for past sins. Now it's time to move on.
sin taxes on cigarettes and alcohol
the Christian doctrine of original sin
Believers are called on to turn away from sin and embrace a life of prayer.
Father, I have committed a sin.
He was pursuing an active life of sin when he felt the Lord speaking to him.
• It's a sin to waste taxpayers' money like that.

Idioms: something for your sins  ugly as sin 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

sin / sɪn / noun [ C or U ]

C2 the offence of breaking, or the breaking of, a religious or moral law:

to commit/confess a sin

He thinks a lot about sin.

[ + to infinitive ] informal I think it 's a sin (= is morally wrong) to waste food, when so many people in the world are hungry.

humorous For my sins (= as if it were a punishment) , I'm organizing the office party this year.

 

sinless / -ləs / adjective

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

sin

[sɪ̱n]
 sins, sinning, sinned
 1) N-VAR Sin or a sin is an action or type of behaviour which is believed to break the laws of God.
 → See also cardinal sin, mortal sin
  The Vatican's teaching on abortion is clear: it is a sin...
  Was it the sin of pride to have believed too much in themselves?
 2) VERB If you sin, you do something that is believed to break the laws of God.
  [V against n] The Spanish Inquisition charged him with sinning against God and man...
  You have sinned and unless you repent your ways you will surely roast in hell.
  Derived words:
  sinner [sɪ̱nə(r)] plural N-COUNT I was shown that I am a sinner, that I needed to repent of my sins.
 3) N-COUNT A sin is any action or behaviour that people disapprove of or consider morally wrong.
  ...the sin of arrogant hard-heartedness...
  The ultimate sin was not infidelity, but public mention which led to scandal.
 4) PHRASE: V inflects If you say that a man and a woman are living in sin, you mean that they are living together as a couple although they are not married. [OLD-FASHIONED]
 a multitude of sinssee multitude
  She was living in sin with her boyfriend.

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1sin /ˈsɪn/ noun, pl sins
1 : an action that is considered to be wrong according to religious or moral law

[count]

• He committed the sin of stealing.
• Murder is a sin.
• I confessed my sins.

[noncount]

• We are not free from sin.
• a world of sin
- see also cardinal sin, deadly sin, mortal sin, original sin, venial sin
2 [count] : an action that is considered to be bad - usually singular
• It's a sin to waste food.
- see also besetting sin
(as) guilty/miserable/ugly as sin informal : very guilty/miserable/ugly
• Even though he was acquitted, most people think he is guilty as sin.
• That house is as ugly as sin.
for your sins chiefly Brit humorous
- used to say that you are doing something unpleasant, difficult, etc., as a form of punishment
For my sins, I was made chairman of the board.
live in sin
- see 1live

not be cut out for sth

not be cut out for sth [idiom]

not to be the right kind of person for something

Usage: 
not be cut out for sth - برای این کار درست نشده است

برای انجام کاری مناسب نبودن

مثال: 

I loved karate and I took some course but I wasn’t good at that. It seems I wasn’t cut for karate.

کاراته رو خیلی دوست داشتم و در کلاسش شرکت کردم ولی خوب کار نمیکردم. مثل اینکه برای این کار ساخته نشده بودم.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

be cut out for something ( also be cut out to be something ) [ usually in questions and negatives ] to have the qualities that you need for a particular job or activity :

In the end, I decided I wasn’t cut out for the army.

Are you sure you’re really cut out to be a teacher?

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

be ˌcut ˈout for sth | be ˌcut ˈout to be sth ( informal ) to have the qualities and abilities needed for sth

He's not cut out for teaching.

He's not cut out to be a teacher.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

not be cut out for sth

C2 to not be the right type of person for something:

I'm not cut out for an office job.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Wiktionary

Adjective

cut out

  1. (idiomatic) Well suited; appropriate; fit for a particular activity or purpose.

    I'm not really cut out for camping outdoors. I'm allergic to mosquito bites.

    We've got our work cut out for us.

Usage notes

Most commonly found in negative constructions, such as "not cut out for ...".

knock (some) sense into sb

knock (some) sense into sb [idiom]

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

knock some sense into somebody

knock/talk some ˈsense into sb idiom

to try and persuade sb to stop behaving in a stupid way, sometimes using rough or violent methods

• Try and talk some sense into her before she makes the wrong decision. 

• Where would I be without you to knock some sense into my head? 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

knock (some) sense into sb

knock (some) sense into sb INFORMAL
to forcefully teach someone not to be foolish:
A couple of years in the army will knock some sense into him.

online

online [adjective]

Describes products, services, or information that can be bought or used on the internet

US /ˈɑːn.laɪn/ 
UK /ˈɒn.laɪn/ 

آنلاین

مثال: 

An online newspaper/magazine/dictionary

Oxford Essential Dictionary

online

 adjective, adverb
using a computer or the Internet:
Online shopping is both cheap and convenient.
Bookings can be made online.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

online

online /ˈɒnlaɪn $ ˈɑːn-, ˈɒːn-/ BrE AmE adjective
1. connected to other computers through the Internet, or available through the Internet OPP offline:
All the city’s schools will be online by the end of the year.
2. directly connected to or controlled by a computer OPP offline:
an online printer
—online adverb:
The reports are not available online yet.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

online

I. on·line [online]   [ˌɒnˈlaɪn]    [ˌɑːnˈlaɪn]    [ˌɔːnˈlaɪn]  adjective
controlled by or connected to a computer or to the Internet
Online shopping is both cheap and convenient.
an online database
online dating (= using the Internet to meet people in order to start a romantic relationship)  
Collocations:
Email and the Internet
Email
receive/get/open an email
write/send/answer/forward/delete an email
check/read/access your email
block/filter (out) junk/spam/unsolicited email
exchange email addresses
open/check your inbox
junk mail fills/floods/clogs your inbox
have/set up an email account
open/send/contain an attachment
sign up for/receive email alerts
Connecting to the Internet
use/access/log onto the Internet/the Web
go online/on the Internet
have a high-speed/dial-up/broadband/wireless (Internet) connection
access/connect to/locate the server
use/open/close/launch a/your web browser
browse/surf/search/scour the Internet/the Web
send/contain/spread/detect a (computer/email) virus
update your anti-virus software
install/use/configure a firewall
accept/enable/block/delete cookies
Using the Internet
visit/check a website/an Internet site/sb's blog
create/design/launch a website/social networking site
start/write/post/read a blog
update your blog/a website
be in/meet sb in/go into/enter an Internet chat room
download/upload music/software/a song/a podcast/a file/a copy of sth
share information/data/files
post a comment/message on a website/an online message board/a web forum/an internet chat room
stream video/audio/music/content over the Internet
join/participate in/visit/provide a (web-based/web/online/Internet/discussion) forum

generate/increase/monitor Internet traffic

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

online / ˈɒn.laɪn /   / ˈɑːn.laɪn / adjective [ before noun ]

A2 describes products, services, or information that can be bought or used on the internet:

an online newspaper/magazine/dictionary

online banking/shopping

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

online

 

/ɒnlaɪn/
also on-line

1.
If a company goes online, its services become available on the Internet. (BUSINESS, COMPUTING)
...the first bank to go online.
...an online shopping centre.
...an online catalogue.
ADJ

2.
If you are online, your computer is connected to the Internet. Compare offline. (COMPUTING)
You can chat to other people who are online.
ADJ

Online is also an adverb.
...the cool stuff you find online.
on line: see line
ADV: ADV after v

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

online

on·line /ˈɑːnˌlaɪn/ adj
1 : connected to a computer, a computer network, or the Internet
• an online printer
• The city libraries are all online.
2 : done over the Internet
• He likes to engage in online chats/discussions.
online shopping/banking
• the company's online sales
- opposite off-line
- online adv
• people who shop/chat online
• I went online to do a search for information about new cars.
• She spends a lot of her free time online.

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