B1 (متوسط)

damn

damn [exclamation]

An expression of anger

US /dæm/ 
UK /dæm/ 

لعنت‌

مثال: 

Damn, I've spilled coffee down my blouse!

Oxford Essential Dictionary

damn

 exclamation
a rude word that people sometimes use when they are angry:
Damn! I've lost my key!

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

damn

I. damn1 /dæm/ BrE AmE interjection not polite
1. used when you are very annoyed or disappointed:
Damn! I’ve left my keys in the office.
2. used when something is impressive or surprising:
Damn, she’s old.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

damn

damn [damn damns damned damning] exclamation, adjective, verb, adverb, noun   [dæm]    [dæm]

exclamation (also old-fashioned dam·mit   [ˈdæmɪt]  ;   [ˈdæmɪt]  ˈdamn it) (informal) a swear word that people use to show that they are annoyed, disappointed, etc.
Oh damn! I forgot he was coming.  
Word Origin:
Middle English: from Old French dam(p)ner, from Latin dam(p)nare ‘inflict loss on’, from damnum ‘loss, damage’.

Idioms: I'll be damned!  I'm damned if …  damn all  damn somebody with faint praise  damn the consequences/expense  not care a damn 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

damn / dæm / exclamation ( also damn it , also dammit ) informal

B1 an expression of anger:

Damn, I've spilled coffee down my blouse!

→  See also goddamn

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

damn

/dæm/
(damns, damning, damned)

1.
Damn, damn it, and dammit are used by some people to express anger or impatience. (INFORMAL, RUDE)
Don’t be flippant, damn it! This is serious.
EXCLAM [feelings]

2.
Damn is used by some people to emphasize what they are saying. (INFORMAL, RUDE)
There’s not a damn thing you can do about it now.
ADJ: ADJ n [emphasis]

Damn is also an adverb.
As it turned out, I was damn right...
ADV: ADV adj/adv

3.
If you say that a person or a news report damns something such as a policy or action, you mean that they are very critical of it.
...a sensational book in which she damns the ultra-right party.
= slam
VERB: V n

4.
see also damned, damning

5.
If you say that someone does not give a damn about something, you are emphasizing that they do not care about it at all. (INFORMAL, RUDE)
PHRASE: V inflects [emphasis]

6.
Some people say as near as damn it or as near as dammit to emphasize that what they have said is almost completely accurate, but not quite. (BRIT INFORMAL, RUDE)
It’s as near as damn it the same thing...
PHRASE: usu PHR n [emphasis]

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1damn /ˈdæm/ interj informal + impolite
- used to show that you are angry, annoyed, surprised, etc.
Damn! That really hurt!
• Well, damn. Why didn't you say you wouldn't be able to come?
Damn! I had no idea you were planning a party for me!

punish

punish [verb] (CRIME)

to cause someone who has done something wrong or committed a crime to suffer, by hurting them, forcing them to pay money, sending them to prison, etc.

US /ˈpʌn.ɪʃ/ 
UK /ˈpʌn.ɪʃ/ 

تنبيه‌ كردن‌، ادب‌ كردن‌،

مثال: 

He punished his children.

او فرزندانش را تنبیه کرد.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

punish

 verb (punishes, punishing, punished )
to make somebody suffer because they have done something wrong:
The children were punished for telling lies.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

punish

punish /ˈpʌnɪʃ/ BrE AmE verb [transitive]
[Word Family: adjective: ↑punishable, ↑punishing, ↑unpunished, ↑punitive; verb: ↑punish; noun: ↑punishment]
[Date: 1300-1400; Language: Old French; Origin: punir, from Latin punire, from poena; ⇨ ↑pain1]
1. to make someone suffer because they have done something wrong or broken the law ⇨ punishment, punitive:
Smacking is not an acceptable way of punishing a child.
He promised to punish severely any officials found guilty of electoral fraud.
punish somebody for (doing) something
It’s unfair to punish a whole class for the actions of one or two students.
They deserve to be punished for putting passengers at risk.
I felt I was being punished for what my mother had done.
punish somebody by doing something
My parents decided to punish me by withdrawing financial support.
punish somebody with something
The House voted to punish the senator with a formal reprimand.
2. [usually passive] if a crime is punished in a particular way, anyone who is guilty of it is made to suffer in that way ⇨ punishment, punitive
punish by/with
In some societies, theft is punished by death.
3. punish yourself to make yourself feel guilty or bad for something you have done:
If you fail, don’t punish yourself.

THESAURUS
punish to do something unpleasant to someone because they have done something wrong or broken the law: Drug smugglers are severely punished. | She wanted to punish him for deceiving her.
fine to make someone pay money as a punishment: The company was fined for safety violations.
sentence if a judge sentences a criminal, he or she gives them an official punishment, usually sending them to prison for a period of time: The judge sentenced Margolis to a year in prison.
penalize (also penalise British English) to officially punish someone, especially by taking away their right to do something or by limiting their freedom in some way: New laws will penalize firms that continue to pollute the environment.
discipline to punish someone who has broken the rules of an organization that they belong to or work for: Officers are expected to discipline soldiers who do not keep their uniforms in good condition.
come down hard on somebody informal to punish someone or criticize them severely: The judge came down hard on Harris, saying that his crime was ‘inexcusable’.
make an example of somebody to punish someone so that other people are afraid to do the same thing: Athletics officials felt they had to make an example of him for using banned drugs.
teach somebody a lesson informal to do something in order to show someone that they must not do something again, when they have behaved very badly: I didn't want to hurt him - I just wanted teach him a lesson. | Maybe a night in jail will teach him a lesson.
make somebody pay (for something) informal to make someone wish they had never done something, by making them suffer: We should make him pay for all the mischief he's caused!

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

punish

 

pun·ish [punish punishes punished punishing]   [ˈpʌnɪʃ]    [ˈpʌnɪʃ]  verb
1. to make sb suffer because they have broken the law or done sth wrong
~ sb Those responsible for this crime will be severely punished.
• My parents used to punish me by not letting me watch TV.

~ sb for sth/for doing sth He was punished for refusing to answer their questions.

2. ~ sth (by/with sth) to set the punishment for a particular crime

• In those days murder was always punished with the death penalty.

3. ~ yourself (for sth) to blame yourself for sth that has happened
Verb forms:

 
Word Origin:
Middle English: from Old French puniss-, lengthened stem of punir ‘punish’, from Latin punire, from poena ‘penalty’.  
Thesaurus:
punish verb T
He was punished for refusing to answer their questions.
disciplinepenalizesentence|informal come down on sb
Opp: reward
punish/discipline/penalize/sentence/come down on sb for doing sth
punish/penalize/sentence/come down on an offender
punish/penalize (bad, unacceptable, etc.) behaviour  
Example Bank:
Damages are not designed to punish, but to compensate for the loss sustained.
He was trying to punish her for deserting him all those years ago.
Never punish children by making them go hungry.
Offenders will be punished with a £1 000 fine.
They will be severely punished for their crimes.
Those found guilty will be punished accordingly.
Those who had opposed the court were duly punished.
He is guilty of contempt of court and is liable to be punished accordingly.
• I would not hesitate to condemn and punish unacceptable behaviour.

• The state is no longer effective in punishing crime.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

punish / ˈpʌn.ɪʃ / verb [ T ] (CRIME)

B1 to cause someone who has done something wrong or committed a crime to suffer, by hurting them, forcing them to pay money, sending them to prison, etc.:

Those responsible for these crimes must be brought to court and punished.

He punished the class by giv ing them extra work.

The oil company was found guilty on ten counts of pollution, and was punished with a $250 million fine.

→  See also punitive

to punish anyone who commits a particular crime:

Drunken driving can be punished with a prison sentence.

 

punish / ˈpʌn.ɪʃ / verb [ T ] (TREAT BADLY)

to use or treat something badly, violently, or without care:

He really punishes that horse of his.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

punish

[pʌ̱nɪʃ]
 punishes, punishing, punished
 1) VERB To punish someone means to make them suffer in some way because they have done something wrong.
  [V n] I don't believe that George ever had to punish the children...
  [V n] According to present law, the authorities can only punish smugglers with small fines...
  [V n for n] Don't punish your child for being honest.
 2) VERB To punish a crime means to punish anyone who commits that crime.
  [V n] The government voted to punish corruption in sport with up to four years in jail...
  [V n] Such behaviour is unacceptable and will be punished.

 

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

punish

pun·ish /ˈpʌnɪʃ/ verb -ish·es; -ished; -ish·ing [+ obj]
1 a : to make (someone) suffer for a crime or for bad behavior
• I think that murderers should be punished by/with life imprisonment.
• She was punished for lying.
• His parents punished him by taking away his allowance.
b : to make someone suffer for (a crime or bad behavior)
• How should I punish my child's misbehavior?
• State law punishes fraud with fines.
• The law states that treason shall be punished by death. [=that the punishment for treason is death]
2 : to treat (someone or something) severely or roughly
• I don't understand why women continue to punish [=damage] their feet by wearing high-heeled shoes.

 

sports

sports [adjective]

Relating to sport

US /spɔːrts/ 
UK /spɔːts/ 

ورزشی

مثال: 

Sports equipment

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

sport

I. sport1 S2 W2 /spɔːt $ spɔːrt/ BrE AmE noun
[Word Family: adjective: ↑sporting, ↑unsporting, ↑sporty; verb: ↑sport; noun: ↑sport]
[Date: 1300-1400; Origin: disport]
1. GAMES
a) [countable] a physical activity in which people compete against each other:
My favourite sports are tennis and swimming.
a sports team
All students are encouraged to take part in a sport.
He picked up the newspaper and turned to the sports pages.
b) [uncountable] British English sports in general:
Why is there so much sport on TV?
I always hated sport at school.
GRAMMAR
The uncountable use of sport is British English only:
▪ I’m not interested in sport. In American English, the plural sports is used:
▪ He likes watching sports on TV.
2. HUNTING [countable] an activity that people do in the countryside, especially hunting or fishing:
the sport of falconry
a demonstration by people opposed to blood sports (=sports that involve killing animals)
3. HELPFUL PERSON [countable usually singular] (also good sport) old-fashioned a helpful cheerful person who lets you enjoy yourself
be a sport (=used when asking someone to help you)
Be a sport and lend me your bike.
4. a good sport someone who does not get angry when they lose at a game or sport
5. a bad/poor sport someone who gets angry very easily when they lose at a game or sport
6. MAN/BOY spoken
a) Australian English used when speaking to someone, especially a man, in a friendly way:
See you later, sport.
b) American English old-fashioned used when speaking to a boy in a friendly way
7. FUN [uncountable] old-fashioned fun or amusement:
Did she torment him merely for sport?
8. make sport of somebody old-fashioned to joke about someone in a way that makes them seem stupid
⇨ ↑field sports, ↑water sports, ↑winter sports
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ verbs
play (a) sport My ambition was to play sport at the highest level.
take part in (a) sport Students are encouraged to take part in a sport of some kind.
do sport British English, do sports American English I did a lot of sport at school.
take up a sport (=start doing it) I took up the sport six years ago.
compete in a sport (=do that sport in competitions) She competed in various sports when she was young.
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + sport
a team sport I liked playing team sports such as football and rugby.
an individual sport You have to be mentally tough to compete in individual sports.
a spectator sport (=one that people enjoy watching) Football is the most popular spectator sport.
competitive sport(s) (=in which people compete and try to win) Competitive sport teaches valuable lessons which last for life.
a contact sport (=one in which players have physical contact with each other) People get hurt in contact sports, but they also have fun.
a winter sport (=skiing, ice skating etc) More and more people are taking up winter sports.
an extreme sport (=one that is dangerous) Many teenagers are attracted to extreme sports such as snowboarding.
professional sport(s) (=which people are paid to do) The kind of money involved in professional sport makes cheating inevitable.
a minority sport (=one that very few people do) Minority sports rarely feature on TV.
■ sports + NOUN
a sports team A lot of schools have their own sports teams.
a sports club She joined her local sports club.
a sports field/ground The village has its own sports field.
a sports event Is this country able to stage a major sports event?
a sports fan (=someone who enjoys watching sport) He was a big sports fan.
a sports personality (=someone who is famous for playing sport) The event will be opened by a well-known sports personality.
sports facilities All our holiday camps have wonderful sports facilities.
sports equipment a new online store selling all kinds of sports equipment
a sports injury The clinic specializes in treating sports injuries.
■ COMMON ERRORS
► Do not say 'make (a) sport'. Say do (a) sport or play (a) sport.
• • •
THESAURUS
■ places where people do sport
field (also pitch British English) a large area of ground, usually covered with grass, where team sports are played: A few kids were playing on the football field. | a hockey field
stadium a large sports field with seats all around it for people to watch team sports or track and field competitions: The atmosphere in the Olympic Stadium was amazing. | a football stadium
ground British English a sports field and the seats and buildings around it, belonging to a particular football, rugby, or cricket team: I met my friends inside the ground.
ballpark/park American English a stadium where baseball is played: Busch Stadium is one of the newest ballparks in Major League.
court an area with lines painted on the ground, for tennis, badminton, basketball, or volleyball: The hotel has four tennis courts and a volleyball court.
diamond the area in a baseball field that is within the shape formed by the four bases. The diamond can also be the whole field: The pitcher stands in the middle of the diamond. | There’s a playground, a picnic area, and a baseball diamond.
track a circular path with lines on it, for running on: In the relay, each runner runs once around the track.
gym a room with machines which you can use to do exercises: He spends an hour in the gym every day.
pool/swimming pool a place where you can swim: He jumped into the deep end of the pool. | I’ll meet you outside the swimming pool.
sports centre British English, sports center American English a building where you can play many types of indoor sports: Why not do exercise classes at your local sports centre?
health club a small sports centre, where you pay to be a member: How much does it cost to join a health club?

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

sport

sport [sport sports sported sporting] noun, verb   [spɔːt]    [spɔːrt]

noun

1. uncountable (BrE) (NAmE sports plural) activity that you do for pleasure and that needs physical effort or skill, usually done in a special area and according to fixed rules
There are excellent facilities for sport and recreation.
• I'm not interested in sport.

• the use of drugs in sport

2. countable a particular form of sport
What's your favourite sport?
team/water sports
• a sports club

see also  blood sport, field sports, spectator sport, winter sports

3. countable (AustralE, NZE, informal) used as a friendly way of addressing sb, especially a man
• How are you doing, sport?

• Good on you, sport!

4. uncountable (formal) enjoyment or fun
The comments were only made in sport.

• to make sport of (= to joke about) sb/sth

5. countable (biology) a plant or an animal that is different in a noticeable way from its usual type 
Word Origin:
late Middle English (in the sense ‘pastime, entertainment’): shortening of disport.  
Culture:
sport and fitness
The British are very fond of sport, but many people prefer to watch rather than take part. Many go to watch football, cricket, etc. at the ground, but many more sit at home and watch sport on television.
Most people today take relatively little general exercise. Over the last 30 or 40 years lifestyles have changed considerably and many people now travel even the shortest distances by car or bus. Lack of exercise combined with eating too many fatty and sugary foods has meant that many people are becoming too fat. Experts are particularly concerned that children spend a lot of their free time watching television or playing computer games instead of being physically active. In recent years, however, there has been a growing interest in fitness among young adults and many belong to a sports club or gym.
In Britain most towns have an amateur football and cricket team, and people also have opportunities to play sports such as tennis and golf. Older people may play bowls. Some people go regularly to a sports centre or leisure centre where there are facilities for playing badminton and squash, and also a swimming pool. Some sports centres arrange classes in aerobics, step and keep-fit. Some people work out (= train hard) regularly at a local gym and do weight training and circuit training. A few people do judo or other martial arts. Others go running or jogging in their local area. For enthusiastic runners there are opportunities to take part in long-distance runs, such as the London marathon. Other people keep themselves fit by walking or cycling. Many people go abroad on a skiing holiday each year and there are several dry slopes and snowdomes in Britain where they can practise.
Membership of a sports club or gym can be expensive and not everyone can afford the subscription. Local sports centres are generally cheaper. Evening classes are also cheap and offer a wide variety of fitness activities ranging from yoga to jazz dancing. Some companies now provide sports facilities for their employees or contribute to the cost of joining a gym.
Sports play an important part in American life. Professional baseball and football games attract large crowds, and many people watch games on television. Although many parents complain about their children being couch potatoes (= people who spend a lot of time watching television), there are sports sessions at school for all ages. College students are usually also required to take physical education classes to complete their studies.
Many popular keep-fit activities began in the US. Charles Atlas, Arnold Schwarzenegger and others inspired people to take up bodybuilding (= strengthening and shaping the muscles). Many women joined the ‘fitness craze’ as a result of video workouts produced by stars such as Jane Fonda and Cindy Crawford which they could watch and take part in at home. New fitness books are continually being published and these create fashions for new types of exercise, such as wave aerobics, which is done in a swimming pool, and cardio kick-boxing, a form of aerobics which involves punching and kicking a punchbag. Many richer people employ their own personal trainer, either at home or at a fitness centre, to direct their exercise programme. Local YMCAs offer programmes which include aerobics, gym, running, weights, treadmills and rowing machines, as well as steam rooms and swimming. But many people just walk or jog in the local park or play informal games of baseball or football. 
Thesaurus:
sport noun
1. U (BrE) (AmE sports)
facilities for sport and recreation
exerciseworkoutaerobics|BrE PE|AmE P. E.
do sport/exercises/a workout/aerobics/PE
2. C
skiing, skating and other winter sports
game
play/take part in a sport/game
team sports/games 
Example Bank:
He does a lot of sport.
I need to take up a sport to get fit.
In the 1960s, the Soviet Union dominated the sport of gymnastics.
In theory, basketball is a non-contact sport.
She has a real passion for sport/sport.
Sports coverage in the local newspaper is good.
The council has allocated an extra £11 million to a new community sports club.
We encourage the children to get involved in sport/sports.
We played sports together when we were kids.
a campaign to promote sport/sports among women
a campaign to promote the sport among young people
government funding for sports programmes/programs for girls and women
popular field sports such as football
sports betting on the Internet
the construction of a new $250-million sports arena
the inherent dangers of adventure sports such as mountaineering
the school sports day
the sport of boxing
Did you do any sport at school?
Did you play any sports in high school?
Do you do a lot of sport?
I'm not interested in sport.
Which is the country's most popular spectator sport?
skiing, skating and other winter sports
• sports shoes

Idiom: a sport 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

sports / spɔːts /   / spɔːrts / adjective [ before noun ]

B1 relating to sport:

sports equipment.

It's the school sports day on Monday.

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

sport

/spɔ:(r)t/
(sports)

Frequency: The word is one of the 1500 most common words in English.

1.
Sports are games such as football and basketball and other competitive leisure activities which need physical effort and skill.
I’d say football is my favourite sport...
She excels at sport...
Billy turned on a radio to get the sports news.
N-VAR

2.
If you say that someone is a sport or a good sport, you mean that they cope with a difficult situation or teasing in a cheerful way. (OLD-FASHIONED)
He was accused of having no sense of humor, of not being a good sport.
N-COUNT [approval]

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

sports

sports /ˈspoɚts/ adj always used before a noun : of, relating to, or suitable for sports
• a sports team/fan
• a sports center
• the sports section/pages of the newspaper
sports equipment/facilities
• a sports bra
- compare 2sport

politics

politics [noun]

The activities of the government, members of law-making organizations, or people who try to influence the way a country is governed

US /ˈpɑː.lə.tɪks/ 
UK /ˈpɒl.ə.tɪks/ 

سیاست

مثال: 

Joe is very active in left-wing politics.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

politics

 noun (no plural)

1 the work and ideas that are connected with government:
Are you interested in politics?

2 the study of government:
She studied Politics at university.
Look at the notes at Congress, election and party.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

politics

politics S2 W2 /ˈpɒlətɪks, ˈpɒlɪtɪks $ ˈpɑː-/ BrE AmE noun
[Word Family: noun: ↑politician, ↑politics, ↑politicization, ↑politicking, ↑politico; adjective: ↑political, ↑politicized, ↑apolitical, ↑politic; verb: ↑politicize; adverb: ↑politically]
[Date: 1500-1600; Language: Greek; Origin: politika (plural), from politikos; ⇨ ↑politic]
1. [U also + plural verb British English] ideas and activities relating to gaining and using power in a country, city etc ⇨ political, politician:
a good understanding of politics in China
modern American politics
Politics have always interested Anita.
national/local etc politics
Brooke’s been involved in city politics since college.
The president should stand above party politics (=working only for your political ↑party).
2. [uncountable] the profession of being a politician:
Flynn retired from politics in 1986.
Her father’s trying to enter politics.
Smith went into politics in his early twenties.
3. [plural] the activities of people who are concerned with gaining personal advantage within a group, organization etc:
I’m tired of dealing with all of the office politics.
Her art examines sexual politics (=how power is shared between men and women).
politics of
the politics of race and class at American universities
4. [plural] someone’s political beliefs and opinions:
I assume her politics must be fairly conservative.
5. [uncountable] especially British English the study of political power and systems of government SYN political science:
Tom is studying for a degree in politics.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + politics
national politics Mark had always been keen to have a career in national politics.
local politics Ann is very active in local politics.
international politics The two superpowers that dominated international politics.
world/global politics There was much going on in world politics at the time.
domestic politics (=within a country) The war had a major impact on the country’s domestic politics.
party politics (=trying to make your party successful) He believes that party politics has no place in local government.
power politics (=attempting to get power by using or threatening to use force) The party argued that power politics would always lead to war.
■ phrases
be involved in politics After university, he became involved in local politics.
take part in politics Young people should be encouraged to take part in politics.
be active in politics (=be involved in) I was very active in politics before I retired.
interfere/meddle in politics He warned the army against interfering in politics.
• • •
THESAURUS
right-wing adjective a right-wing person or group wants low taxes, a strong army and police force, and the individual to be free from government interference as much as possible: right-wing political parties | Some of his supporters are very right-wing. | right-wing policies on gun control
left-wing adjective a left-wing person or group wants the government to make society more equal by increasing taxes for rich people, and taking control of important industries and services: a left-wing newspaper | His views are very left-wing.
green adjective [usually before noun] supporting policies and principles which will protect the environment: green politicians | the Green Party | The government is under pressure to improve its green credentials (=to seem more like it wants to protect the environment).
radical adjective supporting political ideas that will involve great change: radical politicians | a radical economic reform programme
liberal adjective supporting political ideas that will allow people to have greater freedom: They want the government to have a more liberal policy on drugs.
moderate adjective having political opinions which are not extreme: People generally become more moderate as they get older. | The bill is supported by moderate Republicans.
extreme adjective having political opinions which are considered to be very unreasonable by many people: His views on immigration are very extreme. | an extreme right-wing organization

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

politics

pol·it·ics [politics]   [ˈpɒlətɪks]    [ˈpɑːlətɪks]  noun
1. uncountable + singular or plural verb the activities involved in getting and using power in public life, and being able to influence decisions that affect a country or a society
party politics
local politics
He's thinking of going into politics (= trying to become a Member of Parliament, Congress, etc.)

• a major figure in British politics

2. uncountable + singular or plural verb (disapproving) matters concerned with getting or using power within a particular group or organization
I don't want to get involved in office politics.
• the internal politics of the legal profession

• sexual politics (= concerning relationships of power between the sexes)

3. plural a person's political views or beliefs

• His politics are extreme.

4. uncountable =  political science

• a degree in Politics

5. singular a system of political beliefs; a state of political affairs
A politics of the future has to engage with new ideas.  
Collocations:
Politics
Power
create/form/be the leader of a political party
gain/take/win/lose/regain control of Congress
start/spark/lead/be on the brink of a revolution
be engaged/locked in an internal power struggle
lead/form a rival/breakaway faction
seize/take control of the government/power
bring down/overthrow/topple the government/president/regime
abolish/overthrow/restore the monarchy
establish/install a military dictatorship/a stable government
be forced/removed/driven from office/power
resign/step down as party leader/an MP/president/prime minister
enter/retire from/return to political life
Political debate
spark/provoke a heated/hot/intense/lively debate
engage in/participate in/contribute to (the) political/public debate (on/over sth)
get involved in/feel excluded from the political process
launch/start/lead/spearhead a campaign/movement
join/be linked with the peace/anti-war/feminist/civil rights movement
criticize/speak out against/challenge/support the government
lobby/put pressure on the government (to do sth)
come under fire/pressure from opposition parties
Policy
call for/demand/propose/push for/advocate democratic/political/land reform(s)
formulate/implement domestic economic policy
change/influence/shape/have an impact on government/economic/public policy
be consistent with/be in line with/go against/be opposed to government policy
reform/restructure/modernize the tax system
privatize/improve/deliver/make cuts in public services
invest (heavily) in/spend sth on schools/education/public services/(the) infrastructure
nationalize the banks/the oil industry
promise/propose/deliver/give ($80 billion in/significant/substantial/massive) tax cuts
a/the budget is approved/ (especially NAmE) passed by parliament/congress
Making laws
have a majority in/have seats in Parliament/Congress/the Senate
propose/sponsor a bill/legislation/a resolution
introduce/bring in/draw up/draft/adopt/pass a bill/a law/legislation/measures
amend/repeal an act/a law/legislation
veto/vote against/oppose a bill/legislation/a measure/a proposal/a resolution
get/require/be decided by a majority vote
more collocations at economy, voting  
Example Bank:
As a churchman, he was accused of interfering in politics.
Consensus politics places a high value on existing political institutions.
He abandoned politics and went into business.
He argued that it was not practical politics to abolish private schools.
He used dirty politics to trash his opponent's record.
His manners were as mild as his politics were extreme.
I don't understand the politics of it all.
I have always followed politics closely.
In their world politics dominates everything.
Let's not talk politics now.
My personal politics are pretty simple.
She was active in local politics for many years.
The Democrats are simply engaging in partisan politics.
The legislation has been driven by populist politics.
They took the view that Casper was playing power politics with their jobs at stake.
They went into politics in the hope of changing society.
multiculturalism and the rise of identity politics
reforms that are intended to reshape Italian politics
the country's internal politics
the issues which have dominated Irish politics
• the politics surrounding reproduction and fertility

• the role politics played in daily life

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

politics / ˈpɒl.ɪ.tɪks /   / ˈpɑː.lə- / noun

B1 [ U ] the activities of the government, members of law-making organizations, or people who try to influence the way a country is governed:

Joe is very active in left-wing politics.

[ U ] the job of holding a position of power in the government:

The group is campaigning to get more women into politics.

He is planning to retire from politics next year.

[ U ] the study of the ways in which a country is governed:

She read politics at Leicester University.

sb's politics someone's opinions about how a country should be governed:

Her politics have become more liberal over the past few years.

[ plural ] the relationships within a group or organization that allow particular people to have power over others:

I don't like to get involved in office politics.

Word partners for politics

enter / go into / be involved in politics • discuss / talk politics • local / national / regional politics

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

politics

/pɒlɪtɪks/

Frequency: The word is one of the 1500 most common words in English.

1.
Politics are the actions or activities concerned with achieving and using power in a country or society. The verb that follows politics may be either singular or plural.
The key question in British politics was how long the prime minister could survive...
The film takes no position on the politics of Northern Ireland...
Politics is by no means the only arena in which women are excelling.
N-PLURAL
see also party politics

2.
Your politics are your beliefs about how a country ought to be governed.
My politics are well to the left of centre.
N-PLURAL: usu with poss

3.
Politics is the study of the ways in which countries are governed.
He began studying politics and medieval history.
...young politics graduates.
N-UNCOUNT

4.
Politics can be used to talk about the ways that power is shared in an organization and the ways it is affected by personal relationships between people who work together. The verb that follows politics may be either singular or plural.
You need to understand how office politics influence the working environment.
N-PLURAL

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

politics

pol·i·tics /ˈpɑːləˌtɪks/ noun
1 [noncount] : activities that relate to influencing the actions and policies of a government or getting and keeping power in a government
• He is an important figure in American politics.
• The students discussed the latest news in national/local politics.
Politics has always interested her. = She's always been interested in politics.
- often used with a plural verb
Politics have always interested her.
• He talked about the ways in which global politics are changing.
• The mayor's politics [=the political decisions the mayor made] were often criticized during her time in office.
- see also party politics, power politics
2 [noncount] : the work or job of people (such as elected officials) who are part of a government
Politics is a competitive profession.
• She plans on going into politics. = She plans on entering politics. [=she plans on getting a job that involves politics]
3 [plural] : the opinions that someone has about what should be done by governments : a person's political thoughts and opinions
• She has changed her politics.
• His politics are very liberal/conservative. [=he believes that governments should be liberal/conservative]
4 [noncount] often disapproving : the activities, attitudes, or behaviors that are used to get or keep power or an advantage within a group, organization, etc.
• I don't want to get involved in office politics.
• She wrote a book about sexual politics [=the way men and women deal with and behave toward each other] in the academic world.
5 [noncount] chiefly Brit : political science
• a degree in politics
play politics disapproving : to say or do things for political reasons instead of doing what is right or what is best for other people
• She's been accused of playing politics with the investigation.
• Legislators need to stop playing politics with our future.

technology

technology [noun]

(the study and knowledge of) the practical, especially industrial, use of scientific discoveries

US /tekˈnɑː.lə.dʒi/ 
UK /tekˈnɒl.ə.dʒi/ 

تکنولوژی، فناوری

مثال: 

What this ​country ​needs is a ​long-term ​policy for ​investment in​ science and technology.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

technology

 noun (no plural)
knowing about science and about how things work, and using this to build and make things:
science and technology
developments in computer technology

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

technology

technology S2 W1 AC /tekˈnɒlədʒi $ -ˈnɑː-/ BrE AmE noun (plural technologies) [uncountable and countable]
[Word Family: noun: ↑technology, ↑technologist, ↑techie; adverb: ↑technologically; adjective: ↑technological]
new machines, equipment, and ways of doing things that are based on modern knowledge about science and computers:
Modern technology makes moving money around much easier than it used to be.
Advances in technology have improved crop yields by over 30%.
There have been major new developments in satellite technology.
Many people are unwilling to embrace new technologies.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ ADJECTIVES/NOUN + technology
new/modern technology People have no faith in new technology.
the latest technology The boat is equipped with the latest technology.
advanced technology The labs use advanced technology to study the function of various cells.
computer technology the rapid development of computer technology in the 1950s and 1960s
digital technology Digital technology is bringing the media and communications sectors together.
medical technology The advance of medical technology has meant that more patients survive.
military technology Military technology makes huge advances during wartime.
■ phrases
advances/developments in technology Because of developments in technology, minicomputers can now do what mainframes did in the past.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

technology

tech·nol·ogy AW [technology technologies]   [tekˈnɒlədʒi]    [tekˈnɑːlədʒi]  noun (pl. tech·nol·ogies)
1. uncountable, countable scientific knowledge used in practical ways in industry, for example in designing new machines
science and technology
recent advances in medical technology
• to make use of the most modern technologies

see also  high technology, information technology

2. uncountable machinery or equipment designed using technology
The company has invested in the latest technology.
Derived Words: technological  technologically  
Word Origin:
early 17th cent.: from Greek tekhnologia ‘systematic treatment’, from tekhnē ‘art, craft’ + -logia (see -logy).  
Example Bank:
Telecommunications technology is developing fast.
The company is investing heavily in new technologies.
The technology already exists to do this.
This technology enables computers to read handwriting.
We need to exploit existing technologies more fully.
We now have the technologies to transplant limbs.
a car based on alternative technology
a car engine based on technology developed for aeroplanes
exploiting existing technologies more fully
• small businesses that are involved with emerging technologies

• the technology for the extraction of iron ore

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

technology / tekˈnɒl.ə.dʒi /   / -ˈnɑː.lə- / noun [ C or U ]

B1 (the study and knowledge of) the practical, especially industrial, use of scientific discoveries:

computer technology

Modern technology is amazing, isn't it?

What this country needs is a long-term policy for investment in science and technology.

→  See also biotechnology

Word partners for technology

develop / harness technology • have the technology to do sth • advanced / cutting-edge / modern / new technology • the latest technology

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

technology

/teknɒlədʒi/
(technologies)

Frequency: The word is one of the 1500 most common words in English.

Technology refers to methods, systems, and devices which are the result of scientific knowledge being used for practical purposes.
Technology is changing fast...
They should be allowed to wait for cheaper technologies to be developed.

N-VAR

tech‧nolo‧gist (technologists)
...the scientists and technologists that we will need for the future.

N-COUNT

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

technology

tech·nol·o·gy /tɛkˈnɑːləʤi/ noun, pl -gies
1 [noncount] : the use of science in industry, engineering, etc., to invent useful things or to solve problems
• Recent advances in medical technology have saved countless lives.
• The company is on the cutting edge of technology.
2 : a machine, piece of equipment, method, etc., that is created by technology

[count]

• The government is developing innovative/advanced technologies to improve the safety of its soldiers.
• How can we apply this new technology to our everyday lives?

[noncount]

• The car has the latest in fuel-saving technology.
- tech·no·log·i·cal /ˌtɛknəˈlɑːʤɪkəl/ also US tech·no·log·ic /ˌtɛknəˈlɑːʤɪk/ adj
• Many technological advances/developments/changes in medicine have taken place over the past decade.
- tech·no·log·i·cal·ly /ˌtɛknəˈlɑːʤɪkli/ adv
• a technologically advanced society
technologically savvy consumers

comment

comment [noun]

something that you say or write that expresses your opinion

US /ˈkɑː.ment/ 
UK /ˈkɒm.ent/ 

نظر، عقيده‌، اظهار

مثال: 

He made ​negative comments to the ​press.

او نسبت به خبر نظر منفی داد.

Oxford Essential Dictionary

noun
something that you say that shows what you think about something:
She made some interesting comments about the film.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

comment

I. comment1 S1 W2 AC /ˈkɒment $ ˈkɑː-/ BrE AmE noun
[Word Family: noun: ↑comment, ↑commentary; verb: ↑comment]
[Date: 1300-1400; Language: Late Latin; Origin: commentum, from Latin, 'invention', from comminisci 'to invent']
1. [uncountable and countable] an opinion that you express about someone or something SYN remark
comment on/about
his comments about asylum seekers
He was fined for making abusive comments to the referee.
no comment (=used by people in public life when they do not want to answer questions)
2. [uncountable] criticism or discussion of something someone has said or done:
The speech received much comment in the press.
3. be a comment on something to be a sign of the bad quality of something:
The number of adults who cannot read is a sad comment on the quality of our schools.
• • •
COLLOCATIONS
■ verbs
make a comment Everyone was making appreciative comments about the delicious food.
have a comment (=want to make a comment) Do you have any comments on that, David?
pass (a) comment British English (=give an opinion) He looked at my photos but he didn’t pass comment.
invite comment(s) (=ask people to give an opinion) The website invites comments from people who visit it.
welcome comments (=be glad to hear people’s opinions) We would welcome your comments and suggestions.
receive comments It is very helpful to receive comments from the public.
■ adjectives
a brief/quick comment I just want to make a very brief comment.
a helpful/constructive comment (=one that helps you make progress) Pay close attention to your teacher’s constructive comments.
a positive/negative comment There were some very positive comments in the report.
a critical comment The school has received critical comments from inspectors.
(a) fair comment (=a criticism that is reasonable) I accepted as fair comment 90% of what he said.
a snide comment (=unkind and made in a secret or indirect way) She made some really snide comments about you when you weren’t here.
a disparaging/derogatory comment (=criticizing someone or something in an unpleasant way) Never make disparaging comments about a colleague’s work.
a scathing/damning comment (=a very critical one) There were a lot of scathing comments about the film.
an appreciative comment (=showing that you think something is good or nice) Appreciative comments may improve your staff’s performance.
a sarcastic comment (=in which you say the opposite of what you mean, as an unkind joke) I tried to stay calm, despite his sarcastic comments.
a casual comment (=not very serious or important) I only made a casual comment about finding the work a bit boring.
a passing comment (=a quick comment made without thinking about it very carefully) She got upset about a passing comment I made about her clothes.
a shrewd comment (=good at judging people or situations) His newspaper article is always full of shrewd comments.
a wry comment (=saying that something is bad in an amusing way) ‘Perhaps the food could be improved,’ was the wry comment of one prisoner.
a bitter comment (=an angry one) Several pensioners passed some bitter comments.
a public comment The jury are forbidden from making public comments.

THESAURUS
comment something that you say or write in order to give your opinion: Does anyone have any comments? | Readers are invited to send in their comments and suggestions.
remark something that you say: Just ignore them if they start making rude remarks. | I’m not sure what he meant by that last remark.
point something that someone mentions about a subject in a discussion, argument, article etc: That’s an interesting point, Steve. | He raises (=mentions) a number of important points in his paper.
observation a comment in which you say what you think or have noticed about something: Karl Marx made the observation that history repeats itself first as tragedy, second as farce.
aside a comment made in a low voice, that you intend only certain people to hear: ‘Is that true?’, she whispered in an aside to Don.
quip /kwɪp/ a clever and amusing comment: She knew she should reply with some light-hearted quip.
dig informal a comment you make to annoy or criticize someone: I’m tired of her little digs at me.
taunt /tɔːnt $ tɒːnt/ a comment intended to make someone angry or upset: The fans made racist taunts throughout the game.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

comment

com·ment AW [comment comments commented commenting] noun, verb   [ˈkɒment]    [ˈkɑːment]

noun
1. countable, uncountable ~ (about/on sth) something that you say or write which gives an opinion on or explains sb/sth
Have you any comment to make about the cause of the disaster?
She made helpful comments on my work.
The director was not available for comment.
He handed me the document without comment.
(computing) Please email us or leave a comment on our website.

(especially BrE) What she said was fair comment (= a reasonable criticism).

2. singular, uncountable criticism that shows the faults of sth
The results are a clear comment on government education policy.
There was a lot of comment about his behaviour.  
Word Origin:
late Middle English (in the sense ‘explanatory piece of writing’): from Latin commentum ‘contrivance’ (in late Latin also ‘interpretation’), neuter past participle of comminisci ‘devise’.  
Thesaurus:
comment noun C
She made helpful comments on my work.
remarkstatement|formal observation
a/an comment/remark/observation/statement about sth
a/an comment/observation/statement on sth
make a comment/remark/observation/statement
Comment, remark or observation? A comment can be official or private. An observation may be more considered than a remark, but both are always unofficial.  
Synonyms:
statement
comment announcement remark declaration observation
These are all words for sth that you say or write, especially sth that gives information or an opinion.
statementsomething that you say or write that gives information or an opinion, often in a formal way: A government spokesperson made a statement to the press.
commentsomething that you say or write that gives an opinion on sth or is a response to a question about a particular situation: She made helpful comments on my work.
announcementa spoken or written statement that informs people about sth: the announcement of a peace agreement
remarksomething that you say or write that gives an opinion or thought about sb/sth: He made a number of rude remarks about the food.
declaration(rather formal) an official or formal statement, especially one that states an intention, belief or feeling, or that gives information: the declaration of war
observation(rather formal) a comment, especially one based on sth you have seen, heard or read: He began by making a few general observations about the report.
comment, remark or observation?
A comment can be official or private. A remark can be made in public or private but is always unofficial and the speaker may not have considered it carefully. An observation is unofficial but is usually more considered than a remark.
a(n) statement/comment/announcement/remark/declaration/observation about sth
a(n) statement/comment/observation on sth
a(n) public/official statement/comment/announcement/declaration
to make a(n) statement/comment/announcement/remark/declaration/observation
to issue a(n) statement/announcement/declaration 
Example Bank:
Editorial comment in the press tended to support the government in this matter.
Feel free to post your comments if you have any.
He made a few casual comments to her about her hair and now she's chopped it all off!
Her novels were a vehicle for shrewd social comment.
Highly critical comments have been made about the conduct of some ministers.
His visits were the source of much comment.
I would prefer not to pass comment before I have more information on the case.
If you have any comments, please send them to the above address.
KPJ officials declined comment.
She accepted his diagnosis without comment.
She directed all her comments at Steve.
She made a cryptic comment about how the film mirrored her life.
The article attracted much adverse comment.
The attack is a sad comment on the public's understanding of mental illness.
The minister was unavailable for comment last night.
The school has invited comments from parents about the new curriculum.
The spokesman was not available for comment last night.
This idea deserves more than passing comment.
Viewers are encouraged to phone in questions and comments.
We have received many helpful comments from fellow-sufferers.
We welcome comments from readers.
What she said was (a) fair comment.
When asked about the allegations, the chairman replied ‘no comment’.
a book with critical comment on the various strands of feminism
• a general comment on the weather

Idiom: no comment 

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

comment / ˈkɒm.ent /   / ˈkɑː.ment / noun [ C or U ]

B1 something that you say or write that expresses your opinion:

I don't want any comments on/about my new haircut, thank you!

He made negative comments to the press.

I suppose his criticism was fair comment (= a reasonable opinion) .

She was asked about the pay increase but made no comment (= did not give an opinion) .

no comment

C2 used to say that you do not want to answer someone's question

Word partners for comment noun

make a comment • pass comment • attract / draw / excite comment • adverse / caustic / critical / disparaging comments • favourable comments • a casual / general / passing comment • fair comment • comments about / on sth • without comment

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

comment

[kɒ̱ment]
 
 comments, commenting, commented
 1) VERB If you comment on something, you give your opinion about it or you give an explanation for it.
  [V on n/wh] So far, Mr Cook has not commented on these reports...
  [V on n/wh] Stratford police refuse to comment on whether anyone has been arrested...
  You really can't comment till you know the facts...
  [V with quote] `I'm always happy with new developments,' he commented...
  [V that] Stuart commented that this was very true.
 2) N-VAR A comment is something that you say which expresses your opinion of something or which gives an explanation of it.
  He made his comments at a news conference in Amsterdam...
  I was wondering whether you had any comments about that?...
  There's been no comment so far from police about the allegations...
  Lady Thatcher, who is abroad, was not available for comment.
 3) N-SING: usu a N on n If an event or situation is a comment on something, it reveals something about that thing, usually something bad.
  He argues that family problems are typically a comment on some unresolved issues in the family.
  Syn:
  reflection
 4) CONVENTION People say `no comment' as a way of refusing to answer a question, usually when it is asked by a journalist.
  No comment. I don't know anything.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1com·ment /ˈkɑːˌmɛnt/ noun, pl -ments
1 a : a spoken or written statement that expresses an opinion about someone or something

[count]

• The most frequent comment was that the service was slow.
• I find your comments offensive.
• I'd like to begin with a few general comments.
• We have no further comments. [=we have nothing more to say]
Comments or suggestions can be sent to our main Web address.
• She heard him making rude comments [=remarks] about the neighbors.
• We haven't gotten any comments on/about the new design.
• I'd appreciate your comments on this issue.
• We've received positive comments from many of our readers.

[noncount]

• She couldn't be reached for comment.
• We let the remark pass without comment. [=we did not respond to the remark]
✦The phrase no comment is used to tell someone (such as a reporter) that you do not wish to answer a question.
• “Did you know the defendant well?” “No comment.” synonyms see1remark
b [count] : a written note that explains or discusses the meaning of something (such as a piece of writing)
• The new edition includes the translator's comments.
2 [noncount] : spoken or written discussion about something (such as an event in the news)
• The radio program offers news and comment.
• The trial drew widespread comment.
3 [count] : something that shows or makes a statement about the true state or condition of something - usually singular; + on
• Their case is a sad comment [=commentary] on the current state of the justice system.
• She sees the film as a comment on modern values.

dressed to kill

dressed to kill [idiom]

dressed in very attractive and fashionable clothes so as to attract attention and admiration

dressed to kill - شیک و پیک کردن

لباس شیک پوشیدن، شیک و پیک کردن (مثلاً برای تحسین جنس مخالف)

مثال: 

Look at your fancy dress, you look gorgeous, you certainly have dressed to kill, Mana.

لباس قشنگشو ببين، خيلي عالي شدي. تيپت شيک و پيک شده مانا...

معنای کلمه به کلمه: 
لباس پوشیدن برای کشتن

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

dressed to kill

intentionally wearing clothes that attract sexual attention and admiration

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
© Cambridge University Press 2013

upload

upload [verb]

to copy or move programs or information to a larger computer system or to the internet

US /ʌpˈloʊd/ 
UK /ʌpˈləʊd/ 

بارگذاری کردن، آپلود کردن

مثال: 

 

When you click on the link, it will upload the file.

وقتی روی لینک کلیک کنی، فایل را بارگذاری خواهد کرد.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

upload

I. upload1 /ʌpˈləʊd $ -ˈloʊd/ BrE AmE verb [intransitive and transitive]
if information, a computer program etc uploads, or if you upload it, you move it from a small computer to a computer network so that other people can see it or use it OPP download:
It might take a while for this to upload.

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

upload

 

up·load 7 f20 [upload uploads uploaded uploading] verb, noun

 

verb   [ˌʌpˈləʊd]  ;   [ˌʌpˈloʊd]  ~ sth (computing)
to move data to a larger computer system from a smaller one
Opp:  download
Verb forms:

 
Collocations:
Email and the Internet
Email
receive/get/open an email
write/send/answer/forward/delete an email
check/read/access your email
block/filter (out) junk/spam/unsolicited email
exchange email addresses
open/check your inbox
junk mail fills/floods/clogs your inbox
have/set up an email account
open/send/contain an attachment
sign up for/receive email alerts
Connecting to the Internet
use/access/log onto the Internet/the Web
go online/on the Internet
have a high-speed/dial-up/broadband/wireless (Internet) connection
access/connect to/locate the server
use/open/close/launch a/your web browser
browse/surf/search/scour the Internet/the Web
send/contain/spread/detect a (computer/email) virus
update your anti-virus software
install/use/configure a firewall
accept/enable/block/delete cookies
Using the Internet
visit/check a website/an Internet site/sb's blog
create/design/launch a website/social networking site
start/write/post/read a blog
update your blog/a website
be in/meet sb in/go into/enter an Internet chat room
download/upload music/software/a song/a podcast/a file/a copy of sth
share information/data/files
post a comment/message on a website/an online message board/a web forum/an internet chat room
stream video/audio/music/content over the Internet
join/participate in/visit/provide a (web-based/web/online/Internet/discussion) forum

generate/increase/monitor Internet traffic

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary - 4th Edition
 

upload / ʌpˈləʊd /   / -ˈloʊd / verb [ T ]

B1 to copy or move programs or information to a larger computer system or to the internet

→  Compare download verb

© Cambridge University Press 2013

Collins COBUILD Advanced Learner’s English Dictionary

upload

[ʌ̱ploʊd]
 uploads, uploading, uploaded
 VERB: V n

 If you upload data, you transfer it to your computer or from your computer to another computer.

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary: 

1up·load /ˌʌpˈloʊd/ verb -loads; -load·ed; -load·ing [+ obj] computers : to move or copy (a file, program, etc.) from a computer or device to a usually larger computer or computer network
• She uploaded the pictures from her digital camera to her computer.
upload files to the Internet
- compare download

 

let the cat out of the bag

let the cat out of the bag [idiom]

to reveal a secret unintentionally; to make a secret known without wanting to do so

let the cat out of the bag

لو دادن، از دهن کسی در رفتن

مثال: 

Don’t tell Ted about the surprise party. I’m sure he can’t keep it as a secret. He is always careless and forgets. He’ll let the cat out of the bag and Maya will know about the surprise party before.

درباره مهمانی سورپریز چیزی به تد نگو. مطمئنم نمیتونه این رازو پنهان کنه. همیشه بی دقت و فراموش کاره. از دهنش در میره و مایا از جشن سورپریز مطلع میشه.

معنای کلمه به کلمه: 
گربه را از کیسه بیرون انداختن

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

let the ˈcat out of the bag idiom

to tell a secret carelessly or by mistake

• I wanted it to be a surprise, but my sister let the cat out of the bag.

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

let the cat out of the bag
let the cat out of the bag
to let a secret be known, usually without intending to:
I was trying to keep the party a secret, but Mel went and let the cat out of the bag.

be like a bear with a sore head

be like a bear with a sore head [idiom]
مثل برج زهر ماره - be like a bear with a sore head

مثل برج زهر ماره

معنای کلمه به کلمه: 
او مانند یک خرس با سر دردآور است.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

be like a bear with a sore head   British English   informal  

to be rude to people because you are feeling bad-tempered

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

Idioms
 like a bear with a sore ˈhead
(informal) bad-tempered or in a bad-tempered way I should keep out of his way. He’s like a bear with a sore head this morning.

 

Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary 9th edition © Oxford University Press, 2015

Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary

be like a bear with a sore head (US ALSO like a (real) bear) INFORMAL
to be in a bad mood which causes you to treat other people badly and complain a lot:
You're like a bear with a sore head this morning. What's wrong with you?

صفحه‌ها

اشتراک در RSS - B1 (متوسط)